Tag Archives: World Trade Center site

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

TODAY’S FORECAST 

Monday: Overcast with a chance of rain. High of 59. Winds from the SE at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 50%. Monday night: Overcast with a chance of rain. Low of 52. Winds from the SE at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 40%.

EVENT OF THE DAY: The Queens Slur at Alewife

It’s the Slow Food NYC monthly Happy Hour! It’s fun, social, and informal. But it’s also your opportunity to talk to the leadership of Slow Food NYC and let us know what you think. Want to learn more about Slow Food? Just looking to have a relaxing drink with other “Slow” minded people? The Slur is your opportunity – free and open to everyone. Alewife will be extending their happy hour draft and wine specials for our Slur, as well as offering a $16 Burger ‘N Beer special. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

M.E. to begin searching for human remains near WTC site where landing gear was found

The New York City medical examiner’s office is expected to begin searching for human remains this week near the World Trade Center site after a piece of landing gear believed to be from a Sept. 11 hijacked plane was found. Read more: CBS New York/AP

Queens high school students injured in Ohio bus crash

Several children and adults suffered minor injuries after a charter bus carrying students from a Queens High School overturned in central Ohio. Read more: NBC  New York

Focus of Boston Marathon bomb investigation shifts to suspects’ mother

The focus of the Boston Marathon bombings investigation has shifted to the suspects’ mother, who was apparently recorded by Russian intelligence talking on the phone with one of her sons and discussing jihad last year.  Read more: ABC New York

Schumer: FBI ‘may have messed up’ in handling 2011 Tsarnaev investigation

U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) and other Congressional leaders were demanding answers Sunday, saying the FBI should have done a better job in sharing information about the Boston Marathon bombing suspects. Read more: CBS New York/AP

Designer working on horseless carriage for NYC

A car designer is building a prototype of an electric “horseless carriage” that animal advocates hope will replace New York City’s horse-drawn carriages. Read more: Fox New York/AP

Mississippi man to appear in federal court in ricin letters case

A Mississippi martial arts instructor is expected to appear in a federal court on Monday to face charges in connection with the mailing of letters containing the deadly poison ricin to President Barack Obama and other U.S. officials. Read more: Reuters

Agreement reached to complete 9/11 museum


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

On the eve of  September 11, governors Andrew Cuomo and Chris Christie, and Mayor Micheal Bloomberg announced that an agreement had been reached to continue construction of the National September 11 Museum.

“This agreement ensures that it will be restarted very soon and will not stop until the museum is completed. The museum is important to the families of those who died on 9/11 – they’ve contributed photos and memories of their lost loved ones, who deserve a thoughtful tribute. The museum is important to the historical record and will preserve materials and artifacts of great significance that tell the story of what happened on that terrible day,” said Bloomberg.

According to published reports, construction on the museum at the World Trade Center site was stopped because of financial disputes between the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns the World Trade Center site, and the National September 11 Memorial & Museum’ s foundation.

“By ensuring that no additional public funds are spent to complete the Memorial and Museum, today’s agreement puts in place a critical and long overdue safeguard to finally protect toll payers and taxpayers from bearing further costs, and, at the same time, put the project on a path for completion,” said Cuomo.

Before the delay, the museum was set to open on the eleventh anniversary of the terrorist attacks.

 

OpEd: 9/11 forever changed history


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

BY JOHN FEAL

In slightly more than an hour 11 years ago nearly 3,000 lives were tragically cut far too short. More than 3,000 families were instantly redirected, mourning the loss of their loved ones while wondering how they would navigate their futures without them.

The reach of September 11 went well past the East and Hudson Rivers. The same terribly historic hour also propelled our nation’s armed forces into battle in two separate countries, causing the loss of thousands more of this country’s youth and future leaders.

During that same hour, thousands of firefighters, police officers, emergency medical technicians, correction officers and emergency personnel converged onto the World Trade Center site in order to save their fellow Americans, hoping their skills and training could save the life of even one person.

Soon after the Twin Towers collapsed, first responders realized that they would not save their peers, but that their skills would be needed in an entirely different mission: recovery. They would be joined in this mission during the hours, days, weeks and months following the attacks by tens of thousands of their brothers and sisters in the construction trades, communication industry and volunteers. The goal was not limited to the recovery of the personal effects of those lost, but the recovery of this country from one of its darkest moments. Over the next year the combined efforts of first responders enabled families to find closure in the burials of their loved ones by those who removed the debris from the World Trade Center site and provided these services with an unmatched dignity, professionalism and heroism.

Eleven years after the attack, thousands of first responders now suffer from physical impairments as a result of their work “on the pile” and the surrounding impact zone. Despite being assured by leaders in our nation’s capital that the air at the World Trade Center site was safe to breathe, we now know that this was wholly inaccurate. We now understand that the air at Ground Zero was actually filled with a toxic mixture, and that it could take years to reveal the deadly effects. Additionally, thousands of responders continue to suffer from the psychological impact of what they personally witnessed during their efforts on behalf of this nation. Unprepared for the gruesome war-like discoveries potentially lurking under any pile of debris, responders continue to visualize these horrific scenes daily. An hour 11 years ago is relived nearly 24 hours a day by many.

Today, the FealGood Foundation (FGF) aims to assist these first responders in any way we can, from financial assistance to placing them in the hands of competent legal counsel, from psychological support to assistance enrolling in medical treatment facilities. We have assisted in getting the Zadroga Bill passed so that responders have proper medical care and compensation for the injuries they have sustained.

But our work isn’t over. Virtually every day a new responder reaches out to the FGF for assistance of some kind. We have, in fact, gotten busier over the past two years. As long as any first responder needs assistance, the FGF will be there to help. The unfortunate reality is that the FGF was created out of that same fateful hour; we wish its existence had never been necessary but are proud to provide the services.

Little more than one hour is all it took to forever change the course of the lives of thousands and thousands of people. On this 11th anniversary we honor those lost and all those still profoundly affected.

John Feal is the founder of the FealGood Foundation.