Tag Archives: Woodside

Health Department to treat parts of Queens against West Nile


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of NYC Department of Health

On Monday, Sept. 8, there will be West Nile spraying in parts of Queens to help reduce the mosquito population and the risk of the disease.

The spraying will take place between the hours of 8:00 p.m. and 6 a.m. the next morning. In case of bad weather, the application will be delayed until Tuesday, Sept. 9 during the same hours.

The following neighborhoods are being treated due to rising West Nile virus activity with high mosquito populations, according to the city’s Health Department:

Parts of Auburndale, Flushing, Fresh Meadows, Murray Hill Pomonok, and Queensboro Hill (Bordered by 46th Avenue, Holly Avenue and Kissena Boulevard to the north; Main Street and Elder Avenue to west; Long Island Expressway to the south; and Hollis Court Boulevard to the east).

Parts of Astoria, Jackson Heights, Steinway and Woodside (Bordered by 19th Avenue and 81st Street to the north; 45th Street to the west; 25th Avenue and Brooklyn-Queens Expressway West to the south; and Brooklyn-Queens Expressway East, 25th Avenue, 77th Street and Grand Central Parkway to the east).

WNV2

For the application, the Health Department will spray pesticide from trucks and use a very low concentration of Anvil®, 10 + 10, a synthetic pesticide. When properly used, this product poses no significant risks to human health.

The Health Department recommends that people take the following precautions to minimize direct exposure:

  • Whenever possible, stay indoors during spraying. People with asthma or other respiratory conditions  are encouraged to stay inside during spraying since direct exposure could worsen these conditions.
  • Air conditioners may remain on, however, if you wish to reduce the possibility of indoor exposure to pesticides, set the air conditioner vent to the closed position, or choose the re-circulate function.
  •  Remove children’s toys, outdoor equipment, and clothes from outdoor areas during spraying. If  outdoor equipment and toys are exposed to pesticides, wash them with soap and water before using  again.
  • Wash skin and clothing exposed to pesticides with soap and water. Always wash your produce thoroughly with water before cooking or eating.

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Street cleaning initiative expands to Dutch Kills


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer's office

More streets of western Queens will continue to shine as The Doe Fund expands into Dutch Kills.

The move into the Long Island City neighborhood comes a month after it was announced the nonprofit organization’s reach would be expanding to other areas of Long Island City and Hunters Point, and would also be remaining in Woodside.

The Doe Fund, which employs recently homeless or formerly incarcerated people as part of its Ready, Willing and Able transitional work program, will keep the sidewalks clean and clear corner trash cans on 36th Avenue from 27th to 36th streets.

Two workers will be on-site two days per week from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

“We continue to tackle the issue of street cleanliness head-on,” said Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer who secured $33,000 to begin The Doe Fund program in Dutch Kills. “The maintenance of our commercial corridors and residential streets is a top priority for me.”

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Woodside catering hall sold for $9.8 million


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

Elite Palace catering hall on Garfield Avenue in Woodside is under new management.

V.G.F. Properties LLC sold the building to 6902 Garfield Ave LLC in a $9.8 million transaction, which was finalized on Wednesday, according to city records.

The more than 22,000-square-foot building, which hosts everything from weddings to Sweet 16 parties, has a grand ballroom with 20-foot ceilings and 22 Bavarian crystal chandeliers. The catering hall can accommodate events of up to 700 people. There are also 83 parking spots on the property and valet parking.

The building was converted to a catering hall in 2008, according to Department of Buildings filings. The new owners plan to continue to operate the catering business, according to a representative.

 

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Police release video of suspect in Corona murder


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Video courtesy of NYPD

Cops have released footage of a suspect who is wanted for knifing a man to death in Corona earlier this month.

On the night of his murder, Aug. 3, officers found Fabian Carreno, 30, at about 2:15 a.m. lying on the corner of 97th Street and Northern Boulevard with slash wounds to his face and neck, police said. The suspect and Carreno were allegedly arguing when he was attacked.

Carreno, a Woodside resident, was taken to Elmhurst Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

 

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Woodside resident writes book on famed Brazilian soccer player


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Angy Altamirano

One Woodside resident has scored a goal in the literary world.

Dominique Beaucant, who is originally from France and came to the United States in 1978, is the author of the privately published book called “Garrincha – O Rei Dos Reis,” meaning “Garrincha – A King of Kings.”

The book looks back on the life of Brazilian soccer player Garrincha, whose real name was Manuel “Mané” Francisco dos Santos.

Garrincha, who passed away in 1983, was known for his “dribble” on the soccer field and also for his bent legs which did not prevent him from helping the South American national team take home World Cup titles in 1958 and 1962. He was referred to as nicknames such as “People’s Joy” and “Bent–Legged Angel.”

“He was more than a soccer player, he was a phenomenon,” Beaucant said. “When I saw a book that came out in 1995, I said, ‘You know what? I’m going to do a book one day that gives justice to this great player.’”

The 56-year-old Woodside resident began learning about Brazilian soccer players from his sixth-grade teacher Walter Durando in France. Every time he got together with his teacher he would ask to learn more and before making his trip to America he was given a collection of hundreds of magazine and newspaper clippings of the soccer duo.

As the years went by, his admiration for Garrincha grew into more than just hobby.

“That’s how it started and I never stopped,” Beaucant said. “I was fascinated by the guy, who he was and what he did on the field.”

In 1995, Beaucant, who has been a freelance writer and chef, began jotting down notes on Garrincha and throughout the years kept filling his drawers with hundreds of notes. In 2011, he began combining the notes and started writing the 288-page book.

To complete the book, which is written in Portuguese, contains 245 photographs and comes in a slip case, Beaucant looked back at his large Garrincha collection of newspaper and magazine clippings and images.

He has also traveled to Brazil and Europe for seven years, meeting Garrincha’s family and childhood friends.

More than 100 photographs in the book are never-before-seen images from the French sports newspaper “L’Equipe.”

Each book will be sold individually by Beaucant for $150 and he is plans of taking out a second book on Garrincha as well.

“I never did this book to make money. I never did this book to make a big profit,” Beaucant said. “This book is a result of all of my love, admiration, infatuation, respect and admiration for Garrincha.”

Although the book was printed by a company in New Jersey, the typesetting, cover design and embossing was done by Ebrahim Jaffer of Triboro Printing located at 25-02 Steinway St. in Astoria.

“[Garrincha] is no longer with us physically, but with this book his spirit and his soul [are] still living,”

Beaucant said. “The angel with bent legs, how he was known before, somehow is being reborn and the divine angel that he was is going to fly again.”

For more information or to purchase a book you can email Beaucant at copade58brasilcampeao@aim.com or call 718-626-0486.

 

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Queens straphangers planning to sue over Woodside subway derailment: report


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of MTA / Patrick Cashin


Several passengers who were on the subway train that derailed in Woodside this May are planning on suing the city for millions, claiming the accident left them traumatized and injured, according to a published report.

Queens resident Monifah Kidd filed a notice of claim shortly after the derailment, saying she still suffers from nightmares, the New York Post said. Kidd, who is planning to sue for $5 million, is also reportedly claiming she was left with permanent neck, back and head injuries.

A total of 29 people have filed notices of claim so far, the Post reported.

Those claimants also include a Little Neck lawyer who suffers from neck, back, leg and arm pain, and another Queens resident who claims she was left disabled and is planning to sue for $10 million, the Post said.

A Hunter College student from Queens filed a notice of claim last month, according to published reports, after the subway accident left her with panic attacks.

In the May 2 derailment, 19 people were hurt when the six center cars of an eight-car F train went off the express track near 65th Street and Broadway. Of those hurt, 15 suffered minor injuries and four were taken to the hospital.

 

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Man found murdered in Corona


| ctumola@queenscourier.com


Police are investigating the murder of a 30-year-old man who was slashed to death in Corona on Sunday.

Officers, responding to a 9-1-1 call, discovered Fabian Carreno at about 2:15 a.m. lying on the corner of 97th Street and Northern Boulevard with slash wounds to his face and neck, cops said.

Carreno, a Woodside resident, was taken to Elmhurst Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

There have been no arrests made, authorities said.


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Man shot dead, another stabbed in dispute near Woodside Houses


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

A confrontation between two men Friday night near the New York City Housing Authority’s Woodside Houses resulted in the stabbing of one man and shooting death of another, cops said.

The violence broke out after James Sloane, 30, and Jose Feliciano, 50, got into a dispute, at about 11:15 p.m., around 50-30 Broadway, authorities said. Feliciano stabbed Sloane, who then pulled out a gun and shot the older man, according to police.

Both men were taken to Elmhurst Hospital, where Feliciano was pronounced dead.

Police arrested Sloane and charged him with murder, criminal possession of a weapon and tampering with evidence, cops said.

 

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Cops probing homicide in Woodside


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Police are investigating the death of a man in Woodside on Saturday.

Cops arrived at 37-27 57th St. at about 1 a.m. following a 9-1-1 call about a man who had been shot, cops said. They found a 24-year-old male with a head wound and a 25-year-old man suffering from gunshot wounds in his left leg and back.

Both men were taken to Elmhurst Hospital, where the 24-year-old, who has yet to be identified by police, was pronounced dead, according to authorities.

 

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Elmhurst community grows garden next to LIRR tracks for over 20 years, agency unaware


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photos by Angy Altamirano

Updated Friday, July 25, 12:20 p.m.

 

Something is growing in the Long Island Railroad’s backyard.

But the MTA said it was unaware of hundreds of feet of community gardens snuggled against the railroad tracks in Elmhurst, mere feet from moving trains and in plain view of commuters looking out from train windows.

Elmhurst residents living down 47th Avenue between 76th and 82nd streets have been keeping the gardens, growing everything from flowers to vegetables for more than 20 years, according to one of the urban farmers, who declined to give his name.

These gardens are found behind the apartment buildings lining the avenue and are cared for by residents of the buildings.

The resident said he has been coming to the gardens to pick vegetables for the past 10 years as he picked a zucchini and hot peppers to bring home.

There is only one entrance to these gardens: through a hole cut through a fence that separates the buildings from the tracks.

Although surrounded by garbage, couches and tire rims, the vegetable and flower gardens are well kept. Residents have developed a path to allow visitors to move around the gardens.

One resident said he sees one or two people come in and out of the gardens every morning.

Community Board 4 said it was not aware of the gardens but that residents in the communities surrounding Elmhurst tend to take vacant plots of land and turn them into something useful, mostly gardens.

When asked about these particular gardens, which are on MTA/LIRR property, an LIRR spokesman said there are no records of any formal authorization given to residents at that location.

According to the spokesman, the MTA has a policy that allows individuals and entities to enter into “year-to-year agreements to maintain gardens on MTA agency property, subject to certain requirements.”

The LIRR instructed The Courier to “have [the gardeners] call our real estate person, John Coyne.”

 

EDITOR’S NOTE: An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that an MTA spokesman declined to answer questions directly regarding safety.

 

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Police release sketch of suspect in Woodside punching death


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of NYPD

Cops have released a sketch of the suspect who fatally punched a 56-year-old man in Woodside last month.

Roberto Martires was on Roosevelt Avenue near 69th Street just after midnight on June 21 when he was attacked, cops said. A stranger allegedly walked up to Martires that Saturday night and slugged him the face.

Martires, who was just a few blocks from his home when he was assaulted, was taken to Elmhurst Hospital in critical condition, where he died from his injuries the following Tuesday, according to authorities.

Published reports initially said that Martires’ attacker asked if he was Filipino before punching him, causing him to hit his head on the pavement. But it was later reported that police are not investigating the incident as a hate crime and it may have resulted from the World Cup.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

Cops also released this photo of the suspect last month.

 

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Queens student turns garbage into money, gives back to library


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy of Queens Library


Someone’s garbage can be turned into someone else’s future, according to 14-year-old student Kashfia Zaman.

The Woodside resident is a sophomore at Young Women’s Leadership School of Astoria who began a community service project after a teacher suggested students become involved in starting a volunteer project.

As part of the project, Zaman collects discarded bottles and cans, deposits them for cash, donates the money to the Queens Library at Long Island City, located at 37-44 21 St., and then asks local businesses to match the amount she collects.

“I thought to do something concerning the environment because of global warming,” said Zaman, who hopes to one day be a software engineer or computer programmer. “So I thought about recycling bottles and cans. And I remembered in my elementary school there was a teacher who, when she recycled bottles and cans, she would cash them in to help her sister, whose house fell down in a tornado. So I got all this money, and I decided to do something for the community.”

With the help of her teacher, Zaman drafted a written pledge and asked businesses to sign. She has received matching funds from Astoria business such as Imagination Unisex Hair Designer at 25-01 Newton Ave., Anthia Digenakis of Function Enhancing Physical Therapy at 32-76 31st St. and Guillermo Hung of Pao & Cha Cha at 23-03 Astoria Blvd.

“I decided to give it to the library because the library has always been a very important thing to me. It was always there for me. I could always go to the library and request as many books as I want,” she said.

So far, Zaman has collected more than $120 and purchased new books for tweens, children between 10 to 12 years old, at her library. She said she decided to help get books for younger children because she wants to help them get into the habit of reading and become inspired to volunteer and help out in their communities.

“I was completely blown away by the vastness of her project and I was excited to buy books for our children,” said Tienya Smith, community library manager at Queens Library at Long Island City.

Zaman said that she and a friend are also in the process of creating a website in which they discuss the importance of keeping more libraries open during the weekends, in order for students to have access to do their homework or use the Internet.

“On the website we have letters and pictures explaining why we would want to keep the libraries open on weekends,” she said. “My friend and I are also writing a letter to Mayor Bill de Blasio asking him if he could make a little more space in the budget for libraries.”

 

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Man dies after apparent random attack in Woodside


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

Updated Wednesday, June 25, 11:15 a.m.

A 56-year-old man who was punched in the face in Woodside by a stranger on Saturday has died, according to police.

The victim, identified as Roberto Martires, was on Roosevelt Avenue near 69th Street just after midnight Saturday when the suspect slugged him, cops said.

The assault, which happened only a few blocks from Martires’ home, was seemingly unprovoked, according to police.

Martires was taken Elmhurst Hospital in critical condition, where he died Tuesday, officials said.

According to published reports, Martires’ attacker asked if he was Filipino, then punched him, causing him to hit his head on the pavement.

Cops are looking for a man to question in connection to the assault, and describe him as Hispanic, in his mid twenties and with facial hair.

On Monday, police released a photo of the suspect, who was last seen wearing a white t-shirt, blue jeans and a dark colored baseball cap.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

 

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Actress Jodi Long talks Queens roots, sitcom success


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo by Peter Svenson/Family photo by Miranda Ruane


After spending years gracing the Broadway stage, the small screen and the silver screen, actress Jodi Long’s days growing up in Woodside could seem like a distant memory.

But for her, those experiences and the time spent with her performer parents have helped shape her work and life today.

Long is currently starring in the TBS comedy series “Sullivan & Son,” which kicks off its third season on Tuesday at 10 p.m.

The show centers around a bar in a middle-class Pittsburgh neighborhood owned by Long’s character (“Ok Cha”), her husband (played by Dan Lauria) and their son “Steve” (played by Steve Byrne). Long plays a Korean immigrant mother who, with funny one-liners, doles out tough love and isn’t afraid to tell everyone what they are doing wrong.

Though she is now playing a mother on TV, Long started acting as a child.

Born in Manhattan, she moved to Queens as a baby, with her parents, a Chinese-Aussie tap dancer father and Japanese-American showgirl mother. The two became a popular husband-and-wife nightclub act “Larry and Trudie” in the 1940s and 1950s, and were featured on the Ed Sullivan Show.

Long, with director Christine Choy, produced “Long Story Short,” which accounts her personal family story. The film won the Asian Pacific Film Festival’s Audience Award for Best Documentary.

Along with traveling with her vaudevillian parents as a child, Long landed her first gig in the Broadway play “Nowhere to Go But Up” when she was 7 years old.

“When you are a kid it’s sort of fun,” Long said of the experience and getting to play backstage among the rafters.

But she took a break from acting because her mother said she “needed to be in school.”
Remembering her days attending elementary and middle school in her local neighborhood, Long recalls a Queens that is different than it is today.

“It was diverse in a different way,” she said, noting she was one of only a couple of Asian children in Woodside at the time.

Long found more diversity in high school, when she attended the High School of the Performing Arts in Manhattan, where “it was about your talent, not the color of your skin,” she said.

“In one way acting, the art kind of staged me. It is kind of about the humanity,” Long added.

Long continued studying acting at SUNY Purchase College, and spent the next several decades working her way through roles, including on Broadway, and eventually coming to Hollywood landing parts in television shows and movies, such as “The Cosby Show,” “Sex & the City,” “Desperate Housewives,” “Franklin & Bash,” “The Hot Chick” and “Beginners.”

One of her latest projects is the indie movie “A Picture of You,” which premiered in New York on June 20. The dramatic film centers on estranged siblings who travel from New York City to rural Pennsylvania to pack up the home of their recently deceased mother, played by Long.

“For me I love acting,” Long said. “Whether it’s comedy, sitcom, dramedy.”

As for her current role in “Sullivan & Son,” Long said she sees some differences and similarities in Ok Cha and herself.

“I think I have a little more tact than the character,” she said.

“I think she is a strong woman. I’m a strong woman. [You] need that to survive show business.”

 

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De Blasio signs package of Vision Zero bills at fatal Queens accident site


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo by Diana Robinson/Mayoral Photography Office

A Woodside intersection, where a fatal accident involving an 8-year-old student occurred last December, became the site where a package of traffic safety bills were signed in hopes of a brighter and safer future.

Mayor Bill de Blasio, who was joined by other elected and city officials as well as family members of victims of traffic fatalities, signed 11 bills supporting the city’s Vision Zero initiative on Monday at P.S. 152, less than a block from where third-grader Noshat Nahian was fatally struck by a tractor trailer in December.

“We’ve been taking aggressive action from that day forward, because we understand these collisions injure almost 4,000 New Yorkers a year, and kill over 250 New Yorkers in recent years,” de Blasio said. “And that’s been the minimum. And that’s been an unacceptable reality each year.”

Before signing the bills on June 23, de Blasio paid a visit to the completed Department of Transportation (DOT) project at Northern Boulevard and 61st Street, which includes two pedestrian islands, enhanced crosswalks and parking regulations.

Later this year the busy roadway, between 62nd and 102nd streets, will become one of the first Arterial Slow Zones, lowering the speed limit from 30 mph to 25 mph.

The package of bills includes requiring the DOT to study left turns and come up with a report every five years; to respond to and address major traffic signal issues within 24 hours; to produce a report on work zone safety guidelines on bridges; to install seven Neighborhood Slow Zones this year and in 2015; and to annually lower speeds to 15 to 20 mph near schools. The bills also require the agency to study major roadways and produce a report every five years.

The bills also refer to “Cooper’s Law,” named after 9-year-old Cooper Stock who was fatally struck in Manhattan, which requires the Taxi & Limousine Commission (TLC) to suspend drivers involved in a crash where a person is critically injured or killed and where a driver receives a summons for any traffic-related violation. The package also included the establishment of penalties for vehicles that fail to yield to pedestrians and bicyclists, and requiring the TLC to review crashes with critical injuries or death.

“The passage of today’s bills will bring us closer to making Vision Zero a reality in every neighborhood in the City of New York,” said Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer. “These laws will also will help reduce reckless driving and speeding through our local neighborhoods. Traffic safety is an issue our city takes seriously. Through this legislation, we will make our streets safer for all pedestrians, motorists and cyclists alike.”

The bills also address prohibiting stunt behaviors on motorcycles.

“We have promised the people of this city that we will use every tool we have to make streets safer,” de Blasio said. “Today is another step on our path to fulfilling that promise, and sparing more families the pain of losing a son, a daughter or a parent in a senseless tragedy.”

 

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