Tag Archives: west nile virus

West Nile spraying in Queens today


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of James Gathany/CDC

Today there will be another round of West Nile spraying in Queens to help reduce the mosquito population and the risk of the disease.

Two people in the borough have already contracted the disease as well as four others in New York City.

The spraying will take place from 8 p.m. Thursday until 6 a.m. Friday morning in parts of Lindenwood, Ozone Park and South Ozone Park. Specifically, 97th Avenue, 93rd Street and Liberty Avenue to the north, 76th Street to the  west, North Conduit Avenue to the south and Lefferts Boulevard to the east.

The pesticide being used, Anvil 10 + 10, poses no health risks when used properly, but the Health Department recommends that people take the following precautions to minimize direct exposure:

• Whenever possible, stay indoors during spraying. People with asthma or other respiratory conditions are encouraged to stay inside during spraying since direct exposure could worsen these conditions.

• Air conditioners may remain on, however, if you wish to reduce the possibility of indoor exposure to pesticides, set the air conditioner vent to the closed position, or choose the re-circulate function.

• Remove children’s toys, outdoor equipment and clothes from outdoor areas during spraying. If outdoor equipment and toys are exposed to pesticides, wash them with soap and water before using again.

• Wash skin and clothing exposed to pesticides with soap and water. Always wash your produce thoroughly with water before cooking or eating.

Residents are also advised to take steps to reduce the number of mosquitoes around a home or property, including eliminating standing water in yards. In addition, New Yorkers are urged to:

• Dispose of used tires, tin cans, plastic containers, ceramic pots or similar containers in which water collects;

• Drill holes in the bottoms of recycling containers that are kept outdoors. Make sure roof gutters drain properly and clean clogged gutters in the spring and fall;

• Turn over plastic wading pools and wheelbarrows when not in use and change the water in bird baths twice a week;

• Clean vegetation and debris from the edges of ponds; and

• Clean and chlorinate swimming pools, outdoor saunas and hot tubs, and drain water from pool covers.

More West Nile spraying this week; 2 confirmed cases in Queens


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of James Gathany/CDC

With two confirmed cases of West Nile virus in Queens, the borough will receive another round of pesticide spraying this week to help control increasing mosquito populations.

Parts of eight Queens neighborhoods will have pesticide applied from trucks beginning Tuesday, August 21 at 8 p.m. and lasting through 6 a.m. the next morning, the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said.

This is the seventh West Nile spraying in Queens this summer. Seventy pools of standing water have tested positive for the virus in addition to the two confirmed human cases in the borough.

This year has seen the most West Nile cases throughout the country through the first two weeks of August since the disease was first detected in the United States, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention said.

Parts of Arverne, Bayswater, Edgemere, Far Rockaway, Somerville, Cambria Heights, Saint Albans, Springfield Gardens, Baisley Pond Park and Roy Wilkens Park will be sprayed.

The pesticide being used, Anvil 10 + 10, poses no health risks when used properly, but the Health Department recommends that people take the following precautions to minimize direct exposure:

• Whenever possible, stay indoors during spraying. People with asthma or other respiratory conditions are encouraged to stay inside during spraying since direct exposure could worsen these conditions.

• Air conditioners may remain on, however, if you wish to reduce the possibility of indoor exposure to pesticides, set the air conditioner vent to the closed position, or choose the re-circulate function.

• Remove children’s toys, outdoor equipment and clothes from outdoor areas during spraying. If outdoor equipment and toys are exposed to pesticides, wash them with soap and water before using again.

• Wash skin and clothing exposed to pesticides with soap and water. Always wash your produce thoroughly with water before cooking or eating.

 

More West Nile spraying in Queens this week


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Courtesy of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

For the fifth time this summer, the city will be spraying for West Nile virus in Queens this week.

The Department Health and Mental Hygiene announced they will spray larvicide in three Queens neighborhoods beginning today.

There has been one confirmed case of West Nile in the city this year — a Staten Island man — after 11 were diagnosed with the virus a year ago.

More than 40 pools of standing water have tested positive for the virus in Queens.

The Health Department has already begun spraying parts of Alley Pond Park, College Point and Edgemere. The application of the larvicide will last until 7 p.m. tonight. Larvicide will be applied to the areas again between 6 a.m. and 7 p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday.

The targeted spots are the marsh areas inside Alley Pond Park, the abandoned Flushing airport bounded by the Whitestone Expressway to the east, 20th Avenue to the north, 130th Avenue and Ulmer Street to the west and Ulmer Street and 28th Street to the south and Edgemere Park bounded by Norton Basin to the east, Mott Point to the north, Grass Hassock Channel to the west and Beach 65th Street, De Costa Avenue and Almeda Avenue to the south.

The pesticide being used, Anvil 10 + 10, poses no health risks when used properly, but the Health Department recommends that people take the following precautions to minimize direct exposure:

• Whenever possible, stay indoors during spraying. People with asthma or other respiratory conditions are encouraged to stay inside during spraying since direct exposure could worsen these conditions.

• Air conditioners may remain on, however, if you wish to reduce the possibility of indoor exposure to pesticides, set the air conditioner vent to the closed position, or choose the re-circulate function.

• Remove children’s toys, outdoor equipment and clothes from outdoor areas during spraying. If outdoor equipment and toys are exposed to pesticides, wash them with soap and water before using again.

• Wash skin and clothing exposed to pesticides with soap and water. Always wash your produce thoroughly with water before cooking or eating.

West Nile spraying in Queens today


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Days after the first human case of West Nile virus was identified, the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene announced they will spray larvicide in three Queens neighborhoods.

A Staten Island man was the first confirmed human case of the West Nile virus this year, after 11 were diagnosed with the virus a year ago.

“This first human case of West Nile virus this season provides a vital reminder to protect ourselves against mosquito bites,” said Dr. Thomas Farley, the city’s health commissioner. “Eliminating standing water from your property will help prevent mosquitoes from multiplying. Wearing mosquito repellent when you are outdoors, and long sleeves and pants in the morning and evening will reduce your risk of infection. New Yorkers age 50 and older should be especially careful as they are more likely to become seriously ill, and in rare instances die, if infected.”

Twenty pools of standing water have tested positive for the virus in Queens.

The Health Department will spray parts of Rosedale, Brookville, Laurelton, Springfield Park and Brookville Park beginning on July 31 at 8:15 a.m. The application of the larvicide will last until 6 a.m. the next day.

The area being sprayed is bordered by Francis Lewis Boulevard and 130th Avenue to the north; the Belt Parkway, Farmers Boulevard and Guy R Brewer Boulevard to the west; Rockaway Boulevard to the south and Hook Creek Boulevard, Hook Creek and the Nassau County border to the east.

The pesticide being used, Anvil 10 + 10, poses no health risks when used properly, but the Health Department recommends that people take the following precautions to minimize direct exposure:

• Whenever possible, stay indoors during spraying. People with asthma or other respiratory conditions are encouraged to stay inside during spraying since direct exposure could worsen these conditions.

• Air conditioners may remain on, however, if you wish to reduce the possibility of indoor exposure to pesticides, set the air conditioner vent to the closed position, or choose the re-circulate function.

• Remove children’s toys, outdoor equipment and clothes from outdoor areas during spraying. If outdoor equipment and toys are exposed to pesticides, wash them with soap and water before using again.

• Wash skin and clothing exposed to pesticides with soap and water. Always wash your produce thoroughly with water before cooking or eating.

 

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

DOH to begin spraying for West Nile Virus Monday

Starting Monday, the city Health Department will be spraying parts of the five boroughs to fight the West Nile virus. Helicopters will spray larvicide on marshes and other non-residential areas of Staten Island, Queens and the Bronx. Read more: [NY1]

Hallets Point project could break ground as early as fall 2013 

A proposed, billion-dollar residential and retail project on a desolate stretch of Astoria’s waterfront could break ground as early as fall 2013 — much to the delight of local community leaders. The Hallets Point project, which would create about 2,200 units of housing in seven residential towers, a supermarket and a park along the East River, is expected to begin the city review process within the next few months, a project official said. Read more: [New York Daily News] 

UPDATE: Reports: deadly Queens SUV shooting erupted over woman 

A dispute at a city nightclub – reportedly over a woman – seems to have sparked the execution-style killings of three men in Queens. The New York City Police Department says at least 63 shots were fired at a Jeep Grand Cherokee Saturday morning on 144th Avenue in Springfield Gardens. Three men who were inside were killed, a fourth was injured. Police say the gun may have been an AK-47 assault rifle. Read more: [NY1] 

Cop guns down pit bull when responding to domestic dispute call at a Queens home 

An NYPD detective shot and killed a pit bull when it charged at him while the officer was responding to a domestic-violence call at a Queens home, police said. While the detective was at the house on 112th St. near 107th Ave. in Ozone Park, the dog ran toward him and the officer pulled out his weapon and fired once at the canine, police sources said. Read more: [New York Daily News] 

Lawsuit accuses Qns. neighbor of scaring away home buyers — so they could snatch it up on the cheap

That’s a hell of a way to bring down the price of a home. A Queens couple are accused of being the neighbors from hell, scaring away potential buyers of the home next door just so they could snatch it up on the cheap, according to a lawsuit filed last week. Ozone Park homeowners Charles and Karen Neglia say their neighbors, Guido and Milagros Florentin, are spreading lies to keep rival buyers at bay. Read more: [New York Post] 

West Nile spraying in Queens this week


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Courtesy of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

With summer in the city comes humidity, mosquitoes and the threat of West Nile Virus.

To help fight the spread of the virus, the city’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene will apply larvicide by helicopter to locations throughout Queens, the Bronx and Staten Island beginning today.

The locales are marshy, non-residential areas that are natural breeding grounds for mosquitoes.

In Queens, areas of Alley Pond Park, College Point and Edgemere will be targeted.

Last year, the city saw 11 cases of West Nile, five in Queens.

A Queens woman passed away in March from what the family said was complications from West Nile. The city’s health department is investigating the report.

To help reduce the number of mosquitoes breeding on residents’ property, the health department said to eliminate standing water, clean your gutters and clean and chlorinate swimming pools, outdoor saunas and hot tubs and keep them empty or covered when not in use.

The marsh areas inside Alley Pond Park, the abandoned Flushing airport bounded by the Whitestone Expressway to the east, 20th Avenue to the north, 130th Avenue and Ulmer Street to the west and Ulmer Street and 28th Street to the south and Dubos Point and Edgemere Park bounded by Norton Basin to the east, Mott Point to the north, Grass Hassock Channel to the west and Beach 65th Street, De Costa Avenue and Almeda Avenue to the south.

The spraying began today at 6 a.m. and will last until 7 p.m.  The schedule will be repeated tomorrow and Wednesday.