Tag Archives: USPS

USPS threatens downsizing Whitestone facility, again


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File photo


The United States Postal Service (USPS) plans to ship jobs from its Whitestone processing facility as part of ongoing nationwide consolidation of its centers to stay financially afloat.

The mail service intends to consolidate up to 82 facilities, including the Queens center on 20th Avenue, beginning January 2015 to continue its plan to cut losses, which was approved in 2011. The initiative is projected to save the cash-strapped delivery service more than $3.5 billion in the next five years, according to the USPS.

There are currently 1,015 employees at the Whitestone facility, and it’s yet to be determined how many employees will be affected, a representative for the organization said.

“These cuts will be devastating for so many families already struggling to get by and it is unconscionable for the USPS to balance their books on the backs of working class New Yorkers while compromising their service for Queens residents,” said Congressman Joe Crowley, who fought the announced closure in 2012.

When the Whitestone center faced closure in 2012, the USPS planned to send hundreds of workers to a Brooklyn facility, while others would be scattered to other locations throughout the city, New Jersey or Long Island. But the organization halted the closure.

A representative from the mail service boasted the benefits of past consolidations in other areas. In 2012 and 2013, the USPS consolidated 141 mail processing facilities nationwide, which resulted in “negligible service impact, required no employee layoffs, and generated annual cost savings of about $865 million,” a spokeswoman said in an email.

“In the last three years, the Postal Service recorded financial losses of $26 billion,” the spokeswoman said. “As an organization that receives no taxpayer funds to pay for operating costs and derives all of its revenues from the sale of our products and services, the Postal Service continues to face significant financial challenges associated with the decline of First-Class Mail volume and revenue, wage and benefit inflation, increasing operating costs, as well as legislative mandates and significant debt pressures.”

But representatives from Local 300, the National Postal Mail Handlers Union, said the downsizing could affect delivery times, and would be a hit to families that live near the facility, and ultimately impact the neighborhood.

“We’ve had [workers move] from the Bronx to Melville, Long Island,” said Paul Hogrogian, president of the union, as an example. “It’s very inconvenient. What used to be a 10-minute commute is now a two-hour one. People may move.”

 

 

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Postal Service delays plans to stop Saturday mail delivery


| editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of USPS

BY ANTHONY O’REILLY

The United States Postal Service (USPS) announced it has backed down on its plan to eliminate Saturday delivery after Congress barred the idea.

The USPS Board of Governors made the decision on Tuesday in a closed door meeting.

“Although disappointed with this congressional action, the board will follow the law and has directed the Postal Service to delay implementation of its new delivery schedule until legislation is passed that provides the Postal Service with the authority to implement a financially appropriate and responsible delivery schedule,” a statement from the board said.

The board called the ending of Saturday delivery “responsible changes” in trying to avoid the USPS from becoming a burden to taxpayers.

“It is not possible for the Postal Service to meet significant cost reduction goals without changing its delivery schedule — any rational analysis of our current financial condition and business options leads to this conclusion,” the statement said.

In February the USPS announced it would end Saturday delivery starting the week of August 5 in an attempt to save an estimated $2 billion annually.

Shortly after the announcement, a group of local politicians wrote to Congress, saying the post office was violating “the clearly-stated intent of Congress for the last three decades to continue six-day delivery.”

“Companies that rely on six-day mail delivery may opt to explore private delivery services. This could very well mean significant mail volume decreases for USPS and further financial hardship,” the letter said. “The Postal Service should look to expand rather than limit the scope of its business.”

 

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Pols demand post office reconsider decision to cut Saturday delivery


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of USPS

After the United States Postal Service (USPS) announced last week that it was cancelling delivery of first-class mail on Saturdays, a bipartisan group of local politicians is trying to make it reconsider the decision.

The USPS is choosing to reduce service, starting the week of August 5, so that it can save an estimated $2 billion annually. But, according to a letter sent by Grace Meng and other congressmembers to Postmaster General Patrick Donahue Monday, it could actually cost the post office money.

The letter states that the Postal Service is violating “the clearly-stated intent of Congress for the last three decades to continue six-day delivery,” and that it will weaken the Post Office’s business model, negatively impacting postal employees, companies and consumers who depend on Saturday.

“Companies that rely on six-day mail delivery may opt to explore private delivery services. This could very well mean significant mail volume decreases for USPS and further financial hardship,” the letter says. “The Postal Service should look to expand rather than limit the scope of its business.”

 

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Post office to stop Saturday mail delivery


| editorial@queenscourier.com

File photo

BY ANTHONY O’REILLY

Neither rain, nor sleet, nor snow can stop them, but a massive budget deficit can.

The United States Post Service (USPS) officially announced on Wednesday that it will be cancelling delivery of first-class mail on Saturdays, starting the week of August 5.

Packages, express and priority mail will still be delivered on Saturdays. Offices opened on Saturdays will remain so with delivery to PO boxes continuing.

The post office estimates that they will save $2 billion annually with the cancellation of weekend mail delivery.

In a survey “nearly seven out of ten Americans (70 percent) supported the switch to five-day delivery as a way for the Postal Service to reduce costs in its effort to return the organization to financial stability,” said the post office.

Dorota Tylko from Bayside said the cut in service would not affect her everyday life drastically, saying she primarily uses the post office to send packages.

“I use email for communicating and paying bills,” she said. “It’s not really going to affect me.”

In an interview with The Courier last week, post office spokesperson Congetta Chirichello said the Internet and email is a major factor in the recent decrease in the size of ‘snail mail’ being delivered.

“From fiscal year 2001 through the end of 2012, mail volume for this category has declined by almost 23 billion pieces,” she said. “Approximately 42 percent.”

 

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Post office raises stamp price


| editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of USPS

BY ANTHONY O’REILLY

Reach down a little deeper into your pocket if you plan to use “snail mail” any time soon.

The United States Postal Service (USPS) implemented an increase in the price of a first class stamp from 45 cents to 46 cents on January 27.

Congetta Chirichello, a spokesperson for the USPS, said the increase in the price of stamps comes at the increase of electricity and gas rates throughout the past few years.

“We don’t pay a fuel surcharge like our competitors,” Chirichello said. “So we have to pay for that ourselves.”

Chirichello said this is the reason why customers have been seeing a “traditional” annual increase in the price of stamps over the past few years. Last year the USPS raised the price from 45 cents to 46 cents.

Another big reason, Chirichello said, for the increase of stamp prices is due to the increase of use in the internet for such tasks in paying bills and communication.

“From fiscal year 2001 through the end of 2012, mail volume for this category has declined by almost 23 billion pieces,” she said. “Approximately 42 percent.

The price increase however didn’t seem to dissuade the people going about their day at the Bayside Postal Office. Residents were in unison in saying the extra penny wouldn’t drastically affect their decision on using “snail mail” for certain tasks, while busily going about mailing letters and packages at the office.

 

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Future of Bayside post office still undelivered


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/photo by Melissa Chan

The fate of the Bayside post office branch has not yet been sealed, but a possible move is under discussion, according to a spokesperson for the United States Postal Service (USPS). Connie Chirichello, a USPS representative, said the widely circulated rumor of the 212-35 42nd Avenue post office branch closing and relocating sometime in 2013 was a “misunderstanding,” adding that the branch is only going through a routine national review of its operations.

“It’s a healthy review of our resources that will best incorporate them into long-term plans for effective and efficient retail service,” she said, adding that a definitive answer on the branch’s future will be determined at a later date.

Last week, Congressmember Gary Ackerman blasted the agency and announced its proposed plans to move the current centrally located branch — located off Bell Boulevard behind the Long Island Rail Road station — to a remote annex at 41-29 216th Street. Despite mixed responses from the USPS, a spokesperson for the congressmember said relocating is still the plan for now.

“Moving the Bayside branch from its prime spot in the middle of the area’s busy commercial strip to a remote and inconvenient location makes absolutely no sense,” Ackerman said. “Not only would this plan adversely impact the local residents and businesses who use this facility, but it could likely cause a further erosion in postal business since its customers may not trek to this out-of-the-way location.”

Ackerman said the USPS presently leases both properties. Postal officials, he said, claimed swapping locations would save the agency money.

No jobs would be lost under the plan, but the congressmember said the agency still needs to follow proper procedure in consolidating facilities, which requires public notice, consultation and input.

“That has not happened,” Ackerman said.

According to Chirichello, the review currently conducted on the Bayside branch is being done to several postal facilities nationwide. She said reviewing offices has become increasingly important as the agency continues to face dire financial circumstances that partly stems from the 42 percent decrease in the amount of single-piece first-class mail since 2001.

“It is prudent for us to look for ways to improve efficiency by making better use of space, staffing, equipment and transportation in processing the nation’s mail,” she said. “A lot of things are on the chalkboard. Taking a look at Bayside is one of them and isn’t going to seal any deal.”

Bayside resident Frank Ringuette, who picks up his mail at a P.O. box in the Bayside branch, said if the change occurs it would be a huge inconvenience for him.

“It doesn’t make any sense,” he said.

Congressmember Ackerman: Bayside post office branch to close


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/photo by Melissa Chan

The United States Postal Service (USPS) will close and relocate its Bayside post office branch, according to Congressmember Gary Ackerman.

USPS officials want to move the centrally located Bayside branch, located at 212-35 42nd Avenue — off Bell Boulevard behind the Long Island Rail Road station — to a remote annex at 41-29 216th Street, the congressmember said. The annex, he said, is located in a much less convenient location on the edge of a residential neighborhood.

“Moving the Bayside branch from its prime spot in the middle of the area’s busy commercial strip to a remote and inconvenient location makes absolutely no sense,” Ackerman said. “Not only would this plan adversely impact the local residents and businesses who use this facility, but it could likely cause a further erosion in postal business since its customers may not trek to this out-of-the-way location.”

According to Ackerman, the USPS presently leases both properties, and its officials say swapping locations would save the agency money.

“The Postal Service is in a financial death spiral, and we’re all aware that the agency is under intense pressure to cut costs. But making it more difficult for consumers to purchase its products and utilize its services is certainly not the way to go,” he said.

The USPS did not yet return calls for comment.

The move would occur sometime in 2013. While no jobs would be lost under the plan, the congressmember said the agency still needs to follow proper procedure in consolidating facilities, which requires public notice, consultation and input.

“That has not happened,” Ackerman said.

Bayside resident Frank Ringuette, who picks up his mail at a P.O. box in the Bayside branch, said the change would be a huge inconvenience for him.

“It doesn’t make any sense,” he said.

 

Glendale denied their own ZIP code, granted “preferred last line”


| brennison@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/photo by Billy Rennison

Denied its own ZIP code, the post office granted Glendale a distinction to help separate itself from neighboring Ridgewood.

The United States Postal Service (USPS) moved Glendale to a “preferred last line,” which will allow Glendale residents to be recognized as such.

“Every time we order something it comes up Ridgewood or Flushing, but we’re Glendale,” said Assemblymember Mike Miller, who along with Congressmember Bob Turner petitioned the USPS for a ZIP code change.

A “preferred last line” will allow the post office and web sites to recognize addresses within the limits of the neighborhood as Glendale instead of automatically changing it to Ridgewood.

“This is the first time we have not been ignored,” said Turner, who called the issue an “irksome problem that has existed for a very long time.”

Since 1979, Glendale has shared the 11385 ZIP code with Ridgewood.

Miller said he has received stacks of letters complaining about Glendale being without ZIP code, but this is a big first step.

“We’ve been trying for years to get this done and nobody would make a change,” Miller said. “In this case we actually got movement. You get movement that’s the first step.”

Currently, officials are determining the boundaries of Glendale so every address will be recognized as such by the post office.

The preferred last line is just a start, officials said.

“We need a unique ZIP code,” said Bob Kozlowski, vice president of the Glendale Property Owners Association.

Miller and Turner said that they will soon reapply for a Glendale ZIP code. They said 11384 is available and would allow the USPS to easily remedy the situation with the change of a single digit.

 

Glendale residents may get a ZIP code of their own


| brennison@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/photo by Billy Rennison

Most of Mary Mendez’s mail says she lives in Ridgewood.

The Glendale resident has grown used to the fact that when ordering items online, her address will come up as Ridgewood.

“Most of the time I’ll just tell people I live there [in Ridgewood],” Mendez said.

The address confusion stems from the fact that Glendale and Ridgewood share the 11385 ZIP code — and have for more than 30 years.

Congressmember Bob Turner and Assemblymember Mike Miller want to change that, though, and have submitted an application to the United States Postal Service (USPS) for a unique Glendale ZIP code.

“Glendale is a unique community and should have its own ZIP code,” Turner said. “Sharing a ZIP code has created numerous, and sometimes dangerous, problems for Glendale residents, such as delays in medication delivery and first responder services.”

Prior to 1979, the neighboring communities shared their zip code with a third neighborhood in another borough — Bushwick.

Residents of the Queens neighborhoods wanted to disassociate with Bushwick following the 1977 riots and were given the ZIP code they have today.

Miller called the lack of an individual ZIP code a serious issue that needs to be addressed. “Real people are affected,” he said.

More than 1,000 Glendale residents signed a petition asking for the change.

Many feel the problem goes deeper than mail addressed to Ridgewood.

“It’s about a community identity, about keeping communities together,” said Nick Roloson, Miller’s chief of staff.

“Most people aren’t sure where Glendale is; it’s kind of no man’s land,” said Mitch Lindstedt, a Glendale resident. “I feel the lack of a ZIP is a big reason why.”

Turner said that 11384 is available and would allow the USPS to easily remedy the situation with the change of a single digit. An answer should come by the end of the summer.

Repeated calls to the USPS for a comment went unreturned.

 

College Point mail center stays open — for now


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

MAIL-CENTERw

While a Queens mail processing center thought its days were numbered, the once possibly doomed facility is getting a stay of execution.

The processing and distribution center, located on 20th Avenue in College Point, has over 1,000 workers and was previously expected to officially cease operations on May 14 as part of a country-wide initiative to cut costs that began in 2011.

The United States Postal Service (USPS) announced plans to move forward with consolidation among its network of 461 mail processing locations in phases. The first segment will lead to the closure of up to 140 locations through February of 2013. Unless the circumstances of the Postal Service change in the interim, a second and final phase, combining 89 facilities, is currently scheduled to start in February of 2014. Consolidations will mostly involve moving operations from smaller to larger facilities and no consolidating activity will occur between September and December due to the high volume of mail sent during the holiday season.

Nationwide consolidation efforts are projected to generate approximately $2.1 billion in annual cost reductions, and lead to total workforce reduction of up to 28,000 employees.

According to a representative from the USPS, employees will begin receiving notifications in the coming weeks about this initiative. Some will be reassigned to other centers, but others may not be so lucky.

But for now, Congressmember Joe Crowley applauded the USPS’s decision to keep the College Point mail processing center open.

“I am so glad the Queens Processing and Distribution Center will remain open and will continue to serve the Queens community,” said Crowley. “Closing this facility would have severely impacted businesses and residents in the community that rely on the center day in and day out. It also would have stripped away hundreds of jobs from Queens at a time when we need every job we can get.”

Prior to the moratorium, the USPS reviewed several facilities. Officials still have not made a final decision about which centers will close.

College Point mail center to close


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File Photo

The United States Postal Service (U.S.P.S.) delivered its final notice to a Queens mail processing center.

Finalizing the U.S.P.S.’s decision to close the College Point Processing and Distribution Center, Triboro district manager Frank J. Calabrese sent a letter to Robert Yaccarino, president of the American Postal Workers Union (APWU) Flushing Local #2286, informing him there would be consolidations among facilities throughout the area, including the College Point location.

“It is projected that these consolidations will result in significant savings for the Postal Service,” wrote Calabrese in the letter. “Some affected career employees may be reassigned to other vacant positions. Reassignments will be made in accordance with the collective bargaining agreement.”

The facility, located on 20th Avenue in College Point, currently has over 1,000 workers.

“Rather than take advantage of the time that has been bought for U.S.P.S. by Congress in a recent moratorium on post office closures, the U.S. Postal Service has decided to finalize their plans to shut down this facility,” said Senator Toby Ann Stavisky. “This is like governmental ‘Jeopardy’ – the U.S. Postal Service has the answers before we’ve asked the questions.”

Stavisky recently filed an appeal with the Postmaster General regarding the U.S.P.S.’s rejection of her request for records concerning the center’s impending closure. According to Stavisky’s office, the request, submitted in December, 2011, fell under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). It was consequently denied.

“They have refused my and my community’s requests for more information and more time to study the closure before executing it,” said Stavisky. “This will be devastating to our neighborhood, and many of my constituents’ livelihoods will be in peril. We deserve better, but U.S. Postal Service seems to make bad decisions first, and ask questions later.”

According to Stavisky’s office, the documents requested by the senator detail a feasibility study conducted by the U.S.P.S. to determine the impact that shutting down the institution would have on service in a particular area. The U.S.P.S. cited FOIA’s “Exemption Five” as reason to withhold records, stating that they refused to release the data because, at the time, a final decision had not yet been made in regards to the facility’s potential finality.

The College Point processing center’s closure is part of nationwide consolidation program currently occurring throughout U.S.P.S. branches.

In December, a spokesperson from the U.S.P.S. told The Courier that they needed to reduce their costs by $20 billion by 2015, in order to return to financial profitability.

According to a representative from Stavisky’s office, the center will officially cease operations on May 14.

Pol wants more info on College Point mail center


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

Dissatisfied with poor communication, Senator Toby Ann Stavisky sent the United States Post Service (U.S.P.S.) a message — provide the public with the information they deserve.

Stavisky filed an appeal with the Postmaster General regarding the U.S. Postal Service’s rejection of her request for records concerning the impending closure of a Queens mail processing center. According to Stavisky’s office, the request, submitted in December, 2011, fell under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). It was consequently denied.

“The Post Office can’t pick and choose which information they feel like releasing to the public as an explanation for closing such an important resource to the community,” said Stavisky. “I recognize that they are in a difficult position, but the U.S. Postal Service needs to show us all the relevant data, and I am challenging the decision to deny it to me, and to my neighbors.”

The facility, located on 20th Avenue in College Point, has over 1,000 workers – jobs likely to be lost in the event of closure.

According to a representative from Stavisky’s office, the documents requested by the senator detail a feasibility study conducted by the U.S.P.S. to determine the impact shutting down the institution would have on service in a particular area. The U.S.P.S. cited FOIA’s “Exemption Five” as reason to withhold records, stating that they refused to release the data because a final decision had not yet been made in regards to the facility’s potential finality.

The College Point processing center’s possible closure is part of nationwide consolidation program currently occurring throughout the U.S. Postal Services’s branches. In December, a spokesperson from the U.S.P.S. told The Courier that they needed to reduce their costs by $20 billion by 2015 in order to return to financial profitability.

Under this program, 252 of the nation’s mail processing centers are slated for possible closure.

 

Astoria Post Office saved


| mpantelidis@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy of Congressmember Carolyn Maloney Assemblymember Aravella Simotas, Congressmember Carolyn Maloney, District Leader Costa Constantinides and Senator Michael Gianaris (left to right) celebrate saving of Grand Station Post Office from possible closure

Patrons of the Grand Station Post Office have had their wish signed, sealed and delivered.

Following months of apprehension regarding the fate of the post office, the United States Postal Service (USPS) recently announced that Grand Station was removed from a list of branches targeted for potential closure.

Congressmember Carolyn Maloney was joined by Senator Michal Gianaris, Assemblymember Aravella Simotas and other community leaders of western Queens at Grand Station on October 19 for a celebratory gathering to announce the saving of the post office.

“For residents and businesses, Grand Station provides vital services,” said Maloney, who led the meeting. “I thank the Postal Service for hearing our concerns and keeping this important community institution open for business. Above all, I’d like to thank the countless residents and business owners of Astoria who spoke out to save their post office. This is really a victory for them and the entire community.”

This past summer, multiple rallies were held in objection to the USPS’ examination of Grand Station, located at 45-08 30th Avenue in Astoria.

Several community leaders also sent a letter to Post Master General Patrick Donahoe, along with petitions signed by over 1,000 residents protesting the prospective closure of the post office.

“As our neighborhood continues to grow, we cannot afford to lose important services such as those provided by the Grand Station Post Office,” said Gianaris. “I am thrilled we were able to save this community resource, particularly for our seniors who spent their lives making our neighborhood as great as it is today.”

The USPS’ investigation studied numerous qualities at 3,652 branches being targeted nationwide, including foot traffic, the number of customers compared to workers’ wages, proximity to other post offices and mail volume.

Grand Station was among the offices examined due in part to its generating only $560,392 in revenue last year, which fell just short of the USPS threshold of $600,000. Closing Grand Station would have saved the USPS $23,460 per year and forced the post office’s patrons to travel roughly half a mile to the next nearest branch.

“Grand Station is faster and very convenient for me and my family,” said Tiziana Cassella, an Astoria resident who visits Grand Station each week. “Closing it would create longer lines and a lot more headaches for everyone. I think it is ridiculous to close it . . . The government should regard what the community wants and needs. We pay our taxes, so we should keep it.”

Photo Courtesy of Congressmember Carolyn Maloney

Assemblymember Aravella Simotas, Congressmember Carolyn Maloney, District Leader Costa Constantinides and Senator Michael Gianaris (left to right) celebrate saving of Grand Station Post Office from possible closure

Hundreds Rally to Save Postal Service


| mchan@queenscourier.com

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Hundreds of postal workers rallied in Bayside on Tuesday, September 27 to save the nation’s postal service and to seek support for a bill they say would pull the postal service out of its financial shortfall.

As part of a national campaign, all 435 congressional districts throughout the country united in their common cause to spread awareness about the real root of the deficit — a congressional mandate that requires the United States Postal Service (USPS) to “pre-fund 75 years worth of future retiree health benefits within just 10 years,” according to national postal unions.

According to the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC), the legal mandate costs the USPS $5.5 billion annually and accounts for 100 percent of the postal service’s $20 billion losses over the past four years.

“We’re asking for a little leeway to be allowed to dip into that fund to cover day to day expenses if needed or to make arrangements so there would be some cash flow,” said Trevor Stuart, president of the Mail Handlers Union branch in Flushing.

More than 200 postal workers and supporters gathered outside Congressmember Gary Ackerman’s office to spread awareness of the proposed legislation, H.R. 1351, that seeks to alleviate post office deficits.

“You’re still people on the job working to really deliver in a real substantial way for the American people,” said Ackerman, a cosponsor of the bill. “You work every single day no matter how tough the weather, six days a week – and some of you even more. Let’s keep it that way.”

Mail handler John Dreyfus told The Courier that he’s concerned for his future.

“We’re already rushing around because people have already been moved around or let go. If we have to move, I would have to work two or three times as hard. It’s just going to be a little more difficult. Something has to give here.”

Dreyfus, 58, works at the Queens Processing and Distribution Center in Flushing.

Due to drastic declines in mail volume, state and nationwide, the center may be closed or consolidated, according to the USPS. It joins 255 other centers nationwide that are at risk of being shut down.

“I met a lot of good people here. I would be sad to see this facility go because I really feel like it supports a great community here,” he said.

According to the USPS, annual mail volume has declined by more than 43 billion pieces in the past five years and is continuing to decline. Total first-class mail has dropped 25 percent and single piece first-class mail — letters bearing postage stamps — has declined 36 percent in the same timeframe.

“Has the mail gotten less? Yes,” said Mark Sobel, NALC director of the Flushing branch. “Is it ready to go out of business? No.”

Flushing mail center may close


| jlane@queenscourier.com

usps-6

Due to drastic declines in mail volume, state and nationwide, the Queens Processing and Distribution Center in Flushing may be closed or consolidated, according to the United States Postal Service (USPS).

The center — the only one in Queens under study — is responsible for sorting and distributing mail throughout Queens. It joins 255 other centers nationwide that are at risk of being shut down.

“We have too many processing plants that are not operating at 100 percent capacity because we have no mail,” said USPS spokesperson Darleen Reid. “It doesn’t make good business for us to continue 452 facilities when we can reduce that by half and still process the mail.”

Reid said the USPS is looking to possibly consolidate its operations into the Brooklyn New York Processing and Distribution Center or the Morgan Processing and Distribution Center in Manhattan.

As far as service, only first-class mail products would be affected, Reid said.

“Right now we can get first-class mail from Queens to Brooklyn or to Manhattan in one to two days. We’re changing that nationally to two to three days,” she said.

There will be no other changes since other mail classes already follow a two to three day delivery standard, Reid said.

According to the USPS, annual mail volume has declined by more than 43 billion pieces in the past five years and is continuing to decline. Total first-class mail has dropped 25 percent and single piece first-class mail — letters bearing postage stamps — has declined 36 percent in the same timeframe.

“Mail volumes have been going down drastically since 2006 and we anticipate that our first-class mail product is never going to return to previous peak levels,” Reid said.

The postal service receives no tax dollars for operating expenses and relies completely on their own products and services for funding. Its main product is first-class mail, Reid said.

“As first class mail declines, so does our revenue and our revenue continues to go down. We’re facing a financial short-fall by the end of September,” she said.

USPS studies will be concluded in three months. By then, they will announce the results to the general public. At that time, mailers will be given the opportunity to comment during public meetings. Their comments will then be considered before the final decision.