Tag Archives: United States Post Service

Postal Service delays plans to stop Saturday mail delivery


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of USPS

BY ANTHONY O’REILLY

The United States Postal Service (USPS) announced it has backed down on its plan to eliminate Saturday delivery after Congress barred the idea.

The USPS Board of Governors made the decision on Tuesday in a closed door meeting.

“Although disappointed with this congressional action, the board will follow the law and has directed the Postal Service to delay implementation of its new delivery schedule until legislation is passed that provides the Postal Service with the authority to implement a financially appropriate and responsible delivery schedule,” a statement from the board said.

The board called the ending of Saturday delivery “responsible changes” in trying to avoid the USPS from becoming a burden to taxpayers.

“It is not possible for the Postal Service to meet significant cost reduction goals without changing its delivery schedule — any rational analysis of our current financial condition and business options leads to this conclusion,” the statement said.

In February the USPS announced it would end Saturday delivery starting the week of August 5 in an attempt to save an estimated $2 billion annually.

Shortly after the announcement, a group of local politicians wrote to Congress, saying the post office was violating “the clearly-stated intent of Congress for the last three decades to continue six-day delivery.”

“Companies that rely on six-day mail delivery may opt to explore private delivery services. This could very well mean significant mail volume decreases for USPS and further financial hardship,” the letter said. “The Postal Service should look to expand rather than limit the scope of its business.”

 

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Pols demand post office reconsider decision to cut Saturday delivery


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of USPS

After the United States Postal Service (USPS) announced last week that it was cancelling delivery of first-class mail on Saturdays, a bipartisan group of local politicians is trying to make it reconsider the decision.

The USPS is choosing to reduce service, starting the week of August 5, so that it can save an estimated $2 billion annually. But, according to a letter sent by Grace Meng and other congressmembers to Postmaster General Patrick Donahue Monday, it could actually cost the post office money.

The letter states that the Postal Service is violating “the clearly-stated intent of Congress for the last three decades to continue six-day delivery,” and that it will weaken the Post Office’s business model, negatively impacting postal employees, companies and consumers who depend on Saturday.

“Companies that rely on six-day mail delivery may opt to explore private delivery services. This could very well mean significant mail volume decreases for USPS and further financial hardship,” the letter says. “The Postal Service should look to expand rather than limit the scope of its business.”

 

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Post office to stop Saturday mail delivery


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

File photo

BY ANTHONY O’REILLY

Neither rain, nor sleet, nor snow can stop them, but a massive budget deficit can.

The United States Post Service (USPS) officially announced on Wednesday that it will be cancelling delivery of first-class mail on Saturdays, starting the week of August 5.

Packages, express and priority mail will still be delivered on Saturdays. Offices opened on Saturdays will remain so with delivery to PO boxes continuing.

The post office estimates that they will save $2 billion annually with the cancellation of weekend mail delivery.

In a survey “nearly seven out of ten Americans (70 percent) supported the switch to five-day delivery as a way for the Postal Service to reduce costs in its effort to return the organization to financial stability,” said the post office.

Dorota Tylko from Bayside said the cut in service would not affect her everyday life drastically, saying she primarily uses the post office to send packages.

“I use email for communicating and paying bills,” she said. “It’s not really going to affect me.”

In an interview with The Courier last week, post office spokesperson Congetta Chirichello said the Internet and email is a major factor in the recent decrease in the size of ‘snail mail’ being delivered.

“From fiscal year 2001 through the end of 2012, mail volume for this category has declined by almost 23 billion pieces,” she said. “Approximately 42 percent.”

 

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Pol wants more info on College Point mail center


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

Dissatisfied with poor communication, Senator Toby Ann Stavisky sent the United States Post Service (U.S.P.S.) a message — provide the public with the information they deserve.

Stavisky filed an appeal with the Postmaster General regarding the U.S. Postal Service’s rejection of her request for records concerning the impending closure of a Queens mail processing center. According to Stavisky’s office, the request, submitted in December, 2011, fell under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). It was consequently denied.

“The Post Office can’t pick and choose which information they feel like releasing to the public as an explanation for closing such an important resource to the community,” said Stavisky. “I recognize that they are in a difficult position, but the U.S. Postal Service needs to show us all the relevant data, and I am challenging the decision to deny it to me, and to my neighbors.”

The facility, located on 20th Avenue in College Point, has over 1,000 workers – jobs likely to be lost in the event of closure.

According to a representative from Stavisky’s office, the documents requested by the senator detail a feasibility study conducted by the U.S.P.S. to determine the impact shutting down the institution would have on service in a particular area. The U.S.P.S. cited FOIA’s “Exemption Five” as reason to withhold records, stating that they refused to release the data because a final decision had not yet been made in regards to the facility’s potential finality.

The College Point processing center’s possible closure is part of nationwide consolidation program currently occurring throughout the U.S. Postal Services’s branches. In December, a spokesperson from the U.S.P.S. told The Courier that they needed to reduce their costs by $20 billion by 2015 in order to return to financial profitability.

Under this program, 252 of the nation’s mail processing centers are slated for possible closure.