Tag Archives: threats

Glendale man who allegedly voiced threats against cops sentenced for weapons charge

| rpozarycki@queenscourier.com

Image via Google Maps

A Glendale man arrested after voicing threats against police officers in the wake of two cop killings last December will spend the next three years behind bars after pleading guilty to a weapons possession charge, prosecutors announced on Monday.

Elvin Payamps, 38, of Edsall Avenue was originally arrested on Dec. 24, 2014, after allegedly being overheard making the threat while talking on a phone at the TD Bank located at 79-55 Metropolitan Ave. The comment came four days after two officers — Detectives Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu — were shot to death by a lone gunman on a Brooklyn street.

Reportedly, Payamps told an unidentified caller that the killer “should have killed two white cops, instead of a Hispanic and an Asian, if the guy really wanted to send a message.” Detectives indicated that the murderer shot Ramos and Liu to avenge recent high-profile, police-involved deaths.

During the state of heightened alert following the double homicide, a bank employee who heard Payamps’ remark notified police after the suspect left the location. After obtaining a description of Payamps and his vehicle, they located him a short time later at the Metro Mall parking lot at 66-26 Metropolitan Ave.

Ironically, the mall — located in a building housing the New York Corrections Department Academy — was evacuated the day before after someone phoned in a bomb threat.

Payamps was taken into custody at the mall after police found a plastic bag containing marijuana and a lead pipe inside the vehicle. After obtaining a search warrant for his home, police recovered a loaded black Jimenez Arms JA 9-mm pistol, a black Mossberg Maverick model 88 12-gauge shotgun with a defaced serial number, ammunition, brass knuckles and two bulletproof vests.


Glendale man arrested after allegedly talking about killing cops

By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

Updated Dec. 29, 9:37 a.m.


A Glendale man has been arrested on weapons charges after he was overheard saying that the officers murdered in last weekend’s shooting should have been white and he wanted to kill cops, authorities said.

A witness called police about 1:40 p.m. on Wednesday, informing them that while inside the TD Bank at 79-55 Metropolitan Ave. in Middle Village he had overheard a man having a cell phone conversation about killing cops before Christmas, and having firearms at his home. According to the Queens district attorney’s office, the witness also overheard the man say that during last weekend’s shooting, white officers should have been killed instead.

The suspect left the bank before cops arrived, but they were able to locate him entering a vehicle near 66-26 Metropolitan Ave., police said. They followed the car, and pulled it over at Metropolitan Avenue and Rentar Plaza for having dark tinted windows.

When the man got out of the car, police spotted a small plastic bag containing marijuana in the front seat and a metal pipe, authorities said.

The witness from the bank identified the car’s occupant as the person he overheard, and police placed the man, 38-year-old Elvin Payamps of Glendale, under arrest, according to authorities.

During a search of Payamps’ home, police recovered metal knuckles, a loaded pistol, a shotgun with a defaced serial number, ammunition and two bulletproof vests, according to District Attorney Richard Brown. One of the vests was labeled as being from the Brooklyn Detention Complex.

After his arrest, according to the district attorney, Payamps admitted to saying that the two officers shot and killed in Brooklyn last weekend should have been white instead of Hispanic and Asian, if the shooter wanted to send a message.

“Today, there will be a wake for one of the two officers brutally gunned down last weekend in Brooklyn,” Brown said on Friday. “We will not under any circumstances tolerate violence against anyone in our community, especially not against police officers who tirelessly protect and serve all of us.”

Payamps was arraigned Thursday night in Queens Criminal Court on two charges of criminal possession of a weapon, aggravated harassment, unlawful use of police uniformed emblem and unlawful possession of marijuana, authorities said. If convicted, he faces up to 15 years in prison.

Bail was set at $500,000 and Payamps’ next court date is on Jan. 7.

In an interview with the New York Post on Saturday, Payamps said that the alleged threats were misconstrued and his words were “free speech.”

“Whatever happened to free speech? I was only saying an opinion,” Payamps told the paper.

He said that he believes the witness, identified by the Post as an ex-NYPD officer, “twisted” his words and should be “prosecuted for lying.”

Payamps said he meant no harm by what he said, supports the police, and even planned on taking his 13-year-old son to slain Officer Rafael Ramos’ funeral, according to the Post.

At least six people have been arrested in the last week in connection to threats against the NYPD, reports said.


Community board chair fires back at Walcott over school employee threats

| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File photo

The city’s schools chancellor chastised a community board leader after residents allegedly threatened his employees at a rowdy Bayside meeting last week.

“I would never allow anyone to be treated in this manner and would expect that you have the same standard,” Dennis Walcott said.

The head of the city’s public education system expressed his “extreme dismay” at a heated Community Board 11 meeting last Monday, when one male and one female resident allegedly verbally threatened two School Construction Authority (SCA) officials.

An older man approached Chris Persheff, the SCA’s Queens site selection manager, called him a liar and threatened to break his legs, The Courier reported last week.

After that, an unidentified person allegedly followed Persheff’s partner, Monica Gutierrez, by car until Gutierrez pulled into an empty lot, city reps said.

The SCA officials were pitching a plan to build an elementary school for 416 students at 210-11 48th Avenue when the May 6 meeting grew contentious.

They plan to file a police report and might take legal action against the alleged belligerents, Gutierrez said.
The altercations occurred after the meeting had adjourned.

In a letter, Walcott said Community Board 11 Chair Jerry Iannece “enabled this behavior by not drawing any boundaries to the abuse.”

He said the proposed new school would alleviate overcrowded facilities in the area. But enraged residents said it would destroy their quality of life, worsen parking and traffic congestion and lead to dangerous crossing conditions for students.

Iannece fired back in a letter, defending his decade-long, “impeccable” reputation for fairness and order.

“As an uncompensated volunteer who has spent countless hours for the betterment of my community, I take personal offense by your remarks,” he said. “It is an affront to me and to all community board chairs, [who] do so much for our city.”

The community board’s education committee said bringing P.S. 130 back to their district would relieve area school congestion. The 200-01 42nd Avenue school is located within District 26, but has mostly served students from District 25 for at least two decades.

Moving the school back to its original district has long been deemed unviable by education officials.

Iannece invited the schools chancellor to review the meeting’s recorded minutes, which he said include a “poor presentation” by the SCA officials.

The two residents’ identities were not known as of press time.

“Although I can appreciate your desire to protect the staff,” Iannece said, “misplaced anger, compounded by erroneous accusations, doesn’t help.”



City may take legal action after contentious Bayside community board meeting

| mchan@queenscourier.com

The city might take legal action after two school construction officials were threatened Monday at a contentious community board meeting.

Bayside residents were enraged at a proposal by the city’s School Construction Authority (SCA) to build a 416-seat elementary school at 210-11 48th Avenue.

They said it would destroy their quality of life, worsen parking and traffic congestion and lead to dangerous crossing conditions for students.

But two attendees took it too far, said Monica Gutierrez, one of two SCA representatives who pitched the application at the May 6 hearing.

Gutierrez said a woman in her 60s approached the pair of speakers after the meeting adjourned and verbally threatened them. Someone then allegedly followed Gutierrez in a car until she pulled into an empty lot.

“She said, ‘You’ll have what’s coming to you. You’ll see,’” Gutierrez said. “When you threaten somebody, there are repercussions. They’re not above the law. They acted very barbaric.”

An older man also approached Chris Persheff, the agency’s Queens site selection manager, at the end of the meeting. The man called Persheff a liar and threatened to break his legs, according to the manager.

“I’ve done this a lot,” he said. “Usually the audience can sort of separate whatever I’m saying with the issue at hand. I’ve never had this personalized before like this.”

Gutierrez said the angry resident “tried to be all up against” Persheff. She said she grabbed the man and told him to calm down.

“It’s too vulnerable of a position to be in,” Persheff said. “It’s just unacceptable.”

Community Board 11 Chair Jerry Iannece said emotions were high, but the threats were uncalled for.

“The residents are very frustrated. They’re skeptical about what they don’t know,” he said. “But I don’t condone violence in any form. There’s no place for intimidation.”

Gutierrez said the city may take legal action against the alleged verbal assailants.

A spokesperson for the city’s Department of Education said the department is “taking appropriate action.”

Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott expressed his “extreme dismay” of the fracas in a letter to Iannece. He said the community board chair “enabled this behavior by not drawing any boundaries to the abuse.”

“I would never allow anyone to be treated in this manner and would expect that you have the same standard,” Walcott said.

Persheff said he would file a police report but had no further comment.

The two residents’ identities were not known as of press time.

“We’ve been in bad neighborhoods, low economic areas, and they treat us with respect,” Gutierrez said. “Yes, they voice their minds, but they respect people.”

“It’s sad,” she continued. “These people are adults, and that’s how they are treating people. We’re just out there trying to do our jobs.”