Tag Archives: third rail

Subway problems continue to plague Queens riders after 7 train service returns

By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Ice buildup on the third rail along the No. 7 line.

Updated 12:19 p.m.

Service on the No. 7 train between Queens and Manhattan was back by the Tuesday morning commute, but subway problems continued to disrupt straphangers in the borough.

After ice built up on the third rail and a train lost power near Queensboro Plaza at about 9:30 a.m. on Monday, suspending service for most of the day, limited service on the No. 7 line returned early the next day between Times Square and Flushing Main Street.

Though the service was back, the MTA said it was limited and for commuters to expect delays and crowding, suggesting a transfer at 74 St-Broadway for E, F, M and R service into Manhattan, if possible. 

But there was more frustration for riders when at about 10 a.m. service was suspended on the N, Q and R trains between Queens Plaza/Queensboro Plaza and 57 St-7 Ave, which was reportedly due to a smoke condition at Lexington-59th St. About an hour later, northbound R trains were running, but on the F line from 57 St to Jackson Hts-Roosevelt Avenue. Service and all three lines didn’t fully return until almost two hours later.

The Queens Courier staff member and Astoria resident Katrina Medoff, who normally takes the No. 7 train to Flushing and transfers to the LIRR to get to the publication’s Bayside office, decided to take the LIRR from Penn Station. But in avoiding possible delays on one line, she encountered serious delays on the Manhattan-bound E, F, M and R trains she need to get to Penn.

The whole process took her almost two hours, instead of the normal one-hour commute.

Tuesday’s continuing service disruptions follow Monday’s massive suspension on the No. 7 train that left riders stuck on the subway for several hours.

The stalled train that got stuck near Queensboro Plaza had to be pulled back into the station by another train after riders were stranded for about two hours. Four more trains that were stopped between stations had to head back to the 61st-Woodside stop.

About 30 minutes before the train stalled, an umbrella was dropped on the third rail at 52nd Street and caught fire, rerouting service from the express tracks for about 40 minutes. An MTA spokeswoman could not confirm if the umbrella ultimately led to the ice buildup and power loss of the other train.

Suspensions continued throughout Monday as the tracks had to be de-iced, forcing riders to take shuttle buses provided by the MTA and other trains as alternatives. By the late afternoon shuttle train service returned between Flushing-Main St and 74 St-Broadway.

For service updates, visit www.mta.info,


7 train suspended following ice on third rail

By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

File photo

Updated 4:36 p.m.

Icy conditions were causing headaches for more than just drivers in Queens on Monday.

Service was suspended on the No. 7 train in both directions beginning that morning after ice built up on the third rail and a train lost power, according to an MTA spokeswoman.

The stalled train, which got stuck near Queensboro Plaza about 9:30 a.m., had to be pulled back into the station by another train after riders were stuck for about two hours. Four more trains that were stopped between stations had to head back to the 61st-Woodside stop.

“Would love to take an alternate train but I’m stuck on the train for an hour now in between stops,” Dmytro Fedkowskyj said, expressing his frustration through The Courier’s Facebook page.

Before the train stalled an umbrella was dropped on the third rail at 52nd Street 30 minutes earlier and caught fire.

Emergency Management Commissioner Joseph Esposito said at a storm update Monday afternoon that the dropped umbrella led to suspensions. Because trains were not running, ice built up on the rails.

But an MTA spokeswoman could not confirm that the incidents were related and said after the umbrella fell on the tracks local service was rerouted to the express tracks, but returned to normal by 9:40 a.m.

There is no word yet on when service will be restored, but according to the MTA, the rails must be de-iced before trains can run again.

There is currently shuttle train service between Flushing-Main St and 74 St-Broadway in both directions.

The MTA is providing shuttle buses between Vernon Blvd-Jackson Av and 74 St-Broadway in both directions, and the Long Island Rail Road is cross honoring at the following stations: Flushing, Mets-Willets Point, Woodside, Hunters Point and Penn Station

The line of commuters waiting for buses in Flushing was three blocks long, according to the 109th Precinct, which tweeted photos of the riders waiting in the freezing rain.

As an alternate the MTA is also advising riders to use E, F, R , N and Q train service or Q60 and/or Q32 bus service.

For service updates, visit www.mta.info,




Queens graffiti legend electrocuted by third rail at Brooklyn subway station: report

By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

A Queens graffiti legend was killed earlier this week when he was electrocuted by the third rail at a Brooklyn subway station, according to a published report.

Jason Wulf, 42, known as “DG,” died around 10 p.m. Wednesday at the 25th Street Station in Sunset Park, the New York Post reported. Wulf was heading to his Queens home at the time, but it wasn’t clear what he was doing when he was found dead on the tracks and the MTA is investigating, the Post said.

An online fundraiser was also set up to raise money for his funeral service that reached its goal of $10,000. According to the Post, on Monday a wake for Wulf will be held at Seneca Chapels followed by a funeral service at St. Matthias Church in Ridgewood.

Wulf, a writer, artist and founder of NWC (New Wave Crew) comes from Ridgewood, and started his career in 1985, even “[painting] subway cars during the clean train movement, a time period in the 1990s when many writers continued to hit trains regardless of the MTA’s strict buff policy,” according to Animal New York.

“DG was able to pull off what many of his fellow writers couldn’t: Create a body of artwork that is intrinsically graffiti, but not a redundant reiteration of his work on the street. Despite his outpouring of creativity, he never embraced the art world or graffiti circuit. Although he sold canvasses, he represented that older school breed of graffiti writer who had no interest in mainstream recognition,” Bucky Turco of Animal New York wrote.