Tag Archives: The Sales Bible

Measuring the ROI of social media? There’s a laugh, and a joke


| editorial@queenscourier.com


By Jeffrey Gitomer

I got an (unsolicited) email offering a webinar to teach me about how to measure, and the importance of measuring, the ROI of social media.

TOTAL JOKE. And a bad one at that.

Social media, business social media, is running wild – with or without you. Your customers and prospective customers are posting on Facebook whether you have the balls to have presence there or not.

And I am not just talking to companies – I am talking to YOU – the individual.

CONSIDER THIS: Of all the grassroots revolutions that have occurred on social media, none of them were started by companies or a governments. They were all started by people – people who were excited, people who were afraid, people who were pissed, and people who wanted change and spoke up. They spoke over CEOs, media, newspapers, government, lobbyists, and politicians.

HERE’S WHAT THEY SHOULD MEASURE: LRI otherwise known as Lost Revenue (and goodwill and customer loyalty) of Idiots.

While Macy’s and most other department stores are/were measuring ROI, Zappos is cleaning their clock, delivering value, connecting with and responding to customers one on one, and building a billion dollar empire in less time than it took Macy’s to expand to a second store 100 years ago.

Webinars on the subject of ROI of social media are likely run by the same people who thought Amazon.com wouldn’t make it. If Bezos measured the ROI at Amazon in the first five years, he would have quit. He accomplished domination while Barnes & Noble was measuring ROI, and Borders was going broke.

Amazon now has total market dominance based on leadership, vision, and technological excellence. Same with Apple. Microsoft used to laugh at them, now their employees all have iPads and iPods at home.

Measure? No, INVEST RESOURCES IN SOCIAL MEDIA WITHOUT MEASURING. NOW!

It’s way too soon to measure.

MAJOR POINT OF UNDERSTANDING: If they had measured the ROI of TV, or the computer, or the automobile, or the telephone, or the Internet after 5 years, NOBODY would have gotten involved, and we’d be in a technological bog – sinking.

Wake up and smell the opportunity!

People guarding nickels have no idea of the power or the value of business social media, much less social media. They have no idea of the lost opportunity, or the lost revenue. They have no idea of the perception and participation of customers.

My bet is people who measure the ROI of social media HAVE NEVER TWEETED. Wanna take that bet?

I define these people as the ones who still have a small rubber circle in the middle of their keyboard – completely out of touch with what’s new, and trying to prevent the unstoppable force of progress, and customers.

Wanna know who else “measured” financial return?

Blockbuster measured online movie services.

BlackBerry measured smartphones.

Microsoft measured music players.

Billion-dollar MIS-MEASUREMENT: Bank of America DIDN’T measure or understand the power of Facebook. They were greedily measuring increased revenue from debit card customers. Their billion dollar loss paled in comparison to their complete loss of goodwill. I doubt they will recover in a decade.

All of those companies are/were foolish.

There’s one company you want to take their time, measure nickels, rely on lawyers, and stick their big toe in the water before getting involved – that one company is your biggest competitor.

Here’s an easy plan to get rolling in a week or two:

1. Gather the email addresses of EVERYONE in your world.

2. Create a first-class, well tagged with key words, business page on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

3. Start a YouTube channel by inviting your customers to film WHY they bought from you.

4. Map out a strategy, and goals for engagement, for Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

5. Assign someone to monitor, post, and RESPOND to all who engage.

6. Create six value-based messages, two each for Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

7. Shoot 2-3 value-based (something your customers could use) videos and post them on YouTube.

8. Invite all of your customers to join you by sending examples of your value messages. I recommend one campaign per media for four weeks – but have links to all in each email.

9. Post something every day on Facebook. Tweet something every day. Link with 2-5 people every day. Post one video a week.

10. If you really want to create some buzz, convert your contacts to Ace of Sales (www.aceofsales.com) – and send emails that differentiate yourself from the competition.

10.5 Only listen to your lawyer if they tell you what you CAN do.

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of The Sales Bible, Customer Satisfaction is Worthless Customer Loyalty is Priceless, The Little Red Book of Selling, The Little Red Book of Sales Answers, The Little Black Book of Connections, The Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude, The Little Green Book of Getting Your Way, The Little Platinum Book of Cha-Ching, The Little Teal Book of Trust, The Little Book of Leadership, and Social BOOM! His website, www.gitomer.com, will lead you to more information about training and seminars, or email him personally at salesman@gitomer.com.© 2012 All Rights Reserved. Don’t even think about reproducing this document without written permission from Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer. 704/333-1112

 

Getting training in order. The correct order.


| editorial@queenscourier.com


By Jeffrey Gitomer

Many companies are considering training programs for the new year.

New budgets. New needs. New opportunities.

And most companies will concentrate on “it.” Whatever it is — more sales, a new product launch, customer service, internal operations, diversity or whatever is “pressing.”

All of that is wrong — or should I say, out of order.

Before you train ANYTHING, before you launch any new program or initiative, ask yourself these two questions:

1. How positive are the attitudes of our people?

2. How attitudinally receptive will our people be to this training?

If the answer to “How’s our attitude?” is “Not too good” or “Inconsistent” or “My attitude is great, it’s everyone else’s attitude that’s the problem!” then the training will be met with resistance, and will fall short of your expected outcome. Way short.

The answer to this dilemma is very simple, yet it’s overlooked at most every company in the world: Train attitude first. Positive attitude. YES! Attitude.

Positive attitude is not a “program” or an “initiative.” It’s an imperative. It’s not the “flavor of the month.” It’s the feeling of and for a lifetime. Your lifetime.

Attitude is the mood of every employee. Positive attitude leads to positive productivity and positive communication.

Attitude is both foundational and fundamental. Attitude is foundational to all aspects of corporate productivity, communication and harmony. It’s the basis for what is erroneously known as morale. It’s NOT morale — it’s attitude. Low morale is a symptom — poor attitude is the problem.

Attitude is fundamental to all aspects of job performance. How much more profitable would your company be if EVERY employee (including you) had the attitude of yes?

These days attitude is easily deteriorated — cutbacks, budget cuts, over-tasked employees, poor leadership, lower profits and increased pressure to “do more with less.” Yet attitude is virtually ignored by every company HR and training department. Why? It’s hard to measure the ROI. Pity.

You’ve heard the expression: Attitude is everything.

Let me break it down for you so you can have a better understanding of how “everything” attitude really is:

Your attitude rules your mood.

Your attitude rules your self-esteem.

Your attitude rules your communication.

Your attitude rules your interactions.

Your attitude rules your thought process.

Your attitude rules how you perceive things.

Your attitude rules how you perceive people.

Your attitude rules how others perceive you.

Your attitude rules your service.

Your attitude rules your sales.

Your attitude rules your career.

Your attitude rules your family.

Your attitude rules your life.

In your business, your attitude rules your sales, your service, your communication and internal morale. And at the end of positive attitude in your business is a ton of referrals and a great reputation.

Pretty important, huh?

Well, if your attitude is so important, how come you don’t spend 15 minutes at home each morning building it? Or 15 minutes in the morning when you get to work? What are YOU doing to ensure that every employee gets a daily YES! message?

Here are a few more attitude insights:

• Attitude starts at home with your family.

• Attitude is personal. It’s not about other people or other circumstances. Attitude is ALL about you.

• Attitude is selfish. You do it for yourself FIRST. Then and only then can you give it, or pass it along, to others.

• Attitude is a choice. You are ALWAYS free to choose: How you give value. Doing what you love. Having the right attitude.

• Attitude is a gift and a blessing — self-given and self-imposed. And it is my greatest hope that you discover that truth and bless yourself forever.

Maybe it’s time to invest in attitude training.

 

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of The Sales Bible, CustomerSatisfaction is Worthless Customer Loyalty is Priceless, The Little Red Book of Selling, The Little Red Book of Sales Answers, The Little Black Book of Connections, The Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude, The Little Green Book of Getting Your Way, The Little Platinum Book of Cha-Ching, The Little Teal Book of Trust, The Little Book of Leadership, and Social BOOM! His website, www.gitomer.com, will lead you to more information about training and seminars, or email himpersonally: salesman@gitomer.com.

© 2012 All Rights Reserved – Don’t even think about reproducing this document without written
permission from Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer . 704/333-1112

Salespeople have questions, Jeffrey has answers


| editorial@queenscourier.com


I get a ton of emails from people seeking insight or asking me to solve sales dilemmas. Here are a few that may relate to your job, your life and, most importantly, your sales thought process right now:

Jeffrey, Your seminars and books have been highly therapeutic to me in my budding sales career, but I have a question I’m having a hard time answering on my own. My wife is building a Mary Kay business, loves what you do, and is dying to put your methods to use. Her business is 80 percent selling product and 20 percent recruiting. A lot of the recruits typically come from the product buyer’s group. How does one combine those two activities without turning off the “makeup buying” customers who are not interested in a sales career? Does someone like her put up a “beauty tips” social media presence to promote to her “makeup buying customers” and then a separate one for recruiting people to a team?Or do you pepper one in with the other? My concern is turning off the “product buying public” that IS interested in beauty tips but NOT interested in being recruited.

I appreciate your guidance, Matt

Matt, Here’s the wisdom I would share with your wife… Luckily, the product you’re selling has been around for years and enjoys a great reputation. I recommend you interview some recruits who have embraced the opportunity to sell and let some of your more successful people post on the website about how they started out loving the product and ended up reselling the product. If the message does not come from you, it will not be a turn off. The key is balance – and your job is to balance beauty tips with beauty money making opportunities of at least 5:1 in favor of beauty tips.

Best regards, Jeffrey

Jeffrey, How do buyers decide, and what are buyers looking for? Alana

Buyers are looking for 4.5 things:

1. A perceived difference of your product and service – and that of your competitors.

2. A better perceived value in buying what you have versus buying from a competitor. (Notice I did not say “lower price.” I said “better value.”)

3. Little or no risk in purchasing from you. The buyer must perceive that the gain of ownership is greater than the risk of purchasing the wrong thing.

4. The buyer must like you, believe you, have confidence in you and trust you. But it begins with liking you.

4.5 Lowest price. Many people (maybe even you) will think I have done them a disservice by not focusing on price concessions or winning a bid. But, if you present the first four elements outlined above, price will go away as an issue in 60-70 percent of the sales you make. The key is this: Buyers and decision makers are looking for “comfort,” not just a “deal.” The decision maker has to feel that it’s a good fit for their company, or they will pass no matter what the price. The decision maker is also going to take into account past dealings and word-of-mouth advertising. All buyers and decision makers in any given industry know one another.Your job, besides having a great product, is to have a great reputation. Having a great reputation reduces the perceived risk and often times is the very key to getting the order.

Best regards, Jeffrey

Jeffrey, In these hard times, what can salespeople do to protect their jobs? Tom

Tom, The antidote is to be the best sales man or sales woman. No one’s going to get rid of you then. There is a challenge among salespeople right now. They’re not really willing to do the hard work that it takes to make selling easy. You need to tweet, have a business Facebook page, have a LinkedIn account, have a YouTube channel, have a blog and have a website where you have registered yourname.com. It’s about building a personal brand. You have to have 500 people following you on Twitter, you have to have 500 LinkedIn connections, you have to have about a thousand people on your Facebook fan page and you have to have a least a dozen YouTube videos up where people give testimonials for you, or where you are giving valuable information to the marketplace. That requires work and time, and you can’t do it during your workday. You’ve also got to network and do prospecting, but it’s a lot easier to prospect on LinkedIn than it is to prospect on the phone with people you don’t know. But instead of performing those strategies, a lot of people are going home at night to watch stupid television shows. Think about this: Will what you’re watching on television help you double your sales? No! Great salespeople are willing to dig in and do the hard work because they understand there’s no nine to five job in selling unless you’re at McDonald’s and you can ask the closing question, “Do you want fries with that?”

Best regards, Jeffrey

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of The Sales Bible, Customer Satisfaction is Worthless Customer Loyalty is Priceless, The Little Red Book of Selling, The Little Red Book of Sales Answers, The Little Black Book of Connections, The Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude, The Little Green Book of Getting Your Way, The Little Platinum Book of Cha-Ching, The Little Teal Book of Trust, The Little Book of Leadership, and Social BOOM! His website, www.gitomer.com, will lead you to more information about training and seminars, or email him personally at salesman@gitomer.com.

© 2011 All Rights Reserved. Don’t even think about reproducing this document

without written permission from Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer. 704/333-1112