Tag Archives: The New York Times

Looking into the artwork of LIC artist Luba Lukova


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Aeroblue © Luba Lukova


What was only supposed to be a one-week visit to New York for an international exhibition has turned into about 25 years of success for Long Island City artist Luba Lukova.

As a young girl in Bulgaria, Lukova never had a doubt as to what she wanted to be when she grew up. Influenced by her grandmother who was an artist, Lukova began to attend art classes and then graduated from an art academy.

Through an invite from Colorado State University, where school officials had seen some of her early artwork, Lukova came to New York for an organized exhibition featuring artists from all over the world.

Her initial idea was to stay in New York for a week and then return to Bulgaria, but she decided to stay indefinitely, and in 1991, she began drawing illustrations for the book review section of The New York Times. She then moved on and drew for the publication’s Op-Ed section covering subjects such as the Middle East.

These illustrations opened up doors for Lukova, exposing her to a larger audience, which got her into theatre work creating posters, and years later she even got a call from then-presidential candidate Barack Obama’s campaign to use one of her images months before his inauguration.

“It was just a miracle. I never went back [to Bulgaria],” she said. “For a young artist, it was a mind-blowing experience and when I saw the reaction of the people, it was really very exciting for me.”

Lukova’s pieces, whether they are on a canvas or theatre poster, all convey social and political issues in what she calls a “simple and accessible way.” She tells a whole story with just a few colors and images and creates visual metaphors for viewers to take in.

“[My artwork] involves thinking and the viewer’s participation,” she said. “All of my work is like that — it’s always provoking stuff. I try to make it accessible and bring something to the contemporary viewer that can stop them and make them think.”

Her “Social Justice” poster portfolio, the first publication from her own publishing company, has gotten her national and international acclaim. Currently some of her work is part of a show at the Museum of Modern Art and Denver Art Museum.

After moving out of Manhattan following 9/11, Lukova has been working and living in the booming art scene found in Long Island City. Last year she took part in the LIC Arts Open festival, which introduced her to a community she has now become a part of and loves.

“I think it’s a great group of artists with a lot of energy,” she said. “The art community here is growing and it is so huge.”

This year Lukova designed the poster for the LIC Arts Open, and her exhibition “Drama on Paper: Posters for the Stage” can be found at The Local at 13-02 44th Ave. throughout the festival.


     LIC ARTS OPEN POSTER © Luba Lukova

“I’m excited to be a part of it again,” Lukova said. “I think what [the festival organizers] do is very admirable and I hope we will keep the community here and we will expand. Because New York without the arts would be a very sad picture. We don’t just want New York to be the city with museums; we need the real art here.”

 

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American Folk Art Museum opening LIC annex


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

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The Long Island City art scene will soon welcome a new neighbor, according to published reports.

The American Folk Art Museum, located at 2 Lincoln Square in Manhattan, is looking to open a 17,000-square-foot annex in the western Queens neighborhood near the LaGuardia Performing Arts CenterThe New York Times reported.

It will contain the museum’s collection, library and provide additional room for exhibitions, with a 2,000 square-foot exhibit hall, the publication said.

“We think it’s a real opportunity to share pieces for which we often get inquiries,” Anne-Imelda Radice, American Folk Art Museum’s director, told The Times. “And Queens is a great location for us.”

The museum’s annex, expected to open in early 2015, will share the neighborhood with many local art institutions including Socrates Sculpture Park and MoMA PS 1.

This is not the first time the American Folk Art Museum and the Museum of Modern Art have shared the same area. The museum was formerly located next door to MoMA in Manhattan, until it had to reportedly move due to financial issues, and MoMA purchased the building in 2011 to create a 100,500-square-foot expansion to its complex.

 

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