Tag Archives: stranded

Video: Teens rescued after becoming stranded on ice in Little Neck Bay

| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Video YouTube/courtesy of Mary Marino

A venture onto a frozen Douglaston bay turned dangerous on Valentine’s Day when two teenagers got stuck on the cracking ice and had to be rescued by the fire department.

Ladder Company 164 and Engine Company 313 responded to the stranded pair around 5 p.m. Saturday, when they found them near Bay and 223rd streets about 300 to 400 feet from the Little Neck Bay shoreline, fire officials said.

When they arrived, FDNY members witnessed one of the teens, believed to be a boy, fall into the icy water and be pulled out by the other person.

Mary Marino, who lives right on the bay, saw the emergency vehicles and ran out to see what was happening.

“The water started rising up and the ice started cracking,” she said.

Marino then grabbed her phone and filmed the speedy rescue.

The teens, a boy and a girl, managed to make it closer to the shore, but were still stuck on the weakening ice, she said. The video shows the first responders placing a ladder across the ice so the two could crawl across it to shore, while some rescuers were in the water in insulated suits to hold the ladder steady.

“They did an excellent job — it was fast,” Marino, said, adding that the entire rescue took about 10 to 15 minutes.

One of the teenagers was taken to Long Island Jewish Medical Center for treatment due to exposure to the water.

Marino, who has lived near the bay for 40 years, said it’s very rare for someone to get stuck on the ice, but decided to post her video of the rescue online to make sure no one else gets stranded on the body of water again.

“You can’t walk on this ice because it’s dangerous,” Marino said.

“They didn’t realize the tide gets high,” she added.

Earlier this month, the FDNY and Parks Department held a press conference on the dangers of walking on frozen waters in city parks.

“This winter we have seen incidents in Central Park, in the Bronx and [on Saturday] in Queens where, if not for the quick response and brave work of FDNY members in frigid, icy waters, New Yorkers may have lost their lives,” said FDNY Commissioner Daniel Nigro in a statement. “Venturing onto the ice of New York City’s rivers and waterways is dangerous. I urge all New Yorkers to stay off the ice for their safety, and for the safety of all FDNY members who respond to these emergencies.”


Queens hiker rescued after snowstorm strands him on Hawaiian volcano

| ctumola@queenscourier.com

NPS Photo/J.Ferracane

A Queens man is lucky to be alive after a snowstorm stranded the hiker near the summit of a Hawaiian volcano.

Alex Sverdlov, 36, a Middle Village resident and Brooklyn College professor, began climbing Mauna Loa, on the Big Island, Sunday, the National Park Service (NPS) said.

He reached the 13,677-foot summit on Tuesday after dropping off his heavy gear at a lower elevation, but, as he was descending, a snowstorm struck, creating white-out conditions.

That night, Sverdlov tried to find the gear he left behind, but was unsuccessful, the NPS said. With only the clothes he had on for protection and a bottle of frozen water, he decided to stay put until sunrise.

Photo courtesy of David Okita

He managed to locate his pack Wednesday morning, but with the deep snow, he didn’t go far, and was forced to spend another night on Mauna Loa.  Sverdlov, who had successfully, summited the volcano last winter, was “worried that he’d die” there, said the NPS.

“I’ve done many crazy hikes, but this one pretty much tops the bill,” said Sverdlov.

But the local park rangers hadn’t forgotten about him.

Sverdlov was the only registered hiker on the volcano after park management closed the mountain to visitors early Tuesday because of the weather. Park rangers first tried to call his cell phone, but couldn’t reach him. They then located his car on Mauna Loa Road, and when they saw it was still there Wednesday, rangers launched a helicopter search, locating him by 9 a.m. Thursday.

“Even the most experienced and prepared hikers can get into trouble in the park,” said John Broward, who serves as the park’s search-and-rescue coordinator. “What saved Alex is that he had a backcountry permit so we knew he was up there, he is extremely fit and he stayed calm. We’re all fortunate this had a happy ending.”

Despite the near-death experience, Sverdlov is not giving up his hiking adventures.

The same afternoon he was rescued, he applied for another backcountry permit, for the park’s remote coastal area, the NPS said.

“This time I’m going to the sunny part of the park,” Sverdlov said.