Tag Archives: Songza

LIC-based Songza officially announces Google partnership


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Songza

Long Island City-based free music streaming service Songza announced on its website Tuesday afternoon it would be joining Google.

“You know why we love building Songza? Because you trust us to make every moment of your day better — and that’s a pretty huge honor,”  Songza said in a statement on its website. “Today, we’re thrilled to announce that we’re becoming part of Google. We can’t think of a better company to join in our quest to provide the perfect soundtrack for everything you do. No immediate changes to Songza are planned, other than making it faster, smarter, and even more fun to use. In the meantime, we’ll be walking on sunshine.” 

The music streaming service then ended its announcement with a link to listen to ” Walking on Sunshine,” by Katrina and the Waves.

The announcement comes as no surprise after the New York Post reported last month that the tech giant was in talks to buy Songza for $15 million.

Songza, which provides music to about 5 million users in the United States and Canada, delivers the listener the right music at the right time through the biggest library of expertly curated playlists through an Android, iPod, iPad or PC. All the playlists are handpicked by music experts and DJs.

The music on the playlists on Songza, which on average feature 60 to 80 songs, are personalized to each listener based on implicit behavior, like pressing thumbs up or down to a song, or explicit behavior, such as your habits and when you listen to certain music. Songza takes into account data; such as time of day, time of week, and the device you are using, to recommend playlists based on the moment.

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Google in talks to buy LIC-based Songza: report


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Songza

Long Island City-based free music streaming service Songza is in talks to be bought by Google, according to a published report.

The tech giant had previously been looking for a streaming service and is offering Songza $15 million, according to the New York Post.

Songza co-founder Eric Davich said he could not comment.

Songza, which provides music to about 5 million users in the United States and Canada, delivers the listener the right music at the right time through the biggest library of expertly curated playlists through an Android, iPod, iPad or PC. All the playlists are handpicked by music experts and DJs.

The music on the playlists on Songza, which on average feature 60 to 80 songs, are personalized to each listener based on implicit behavior, like pressing thumbs up or down to a song, or explicit behavior, such as your habits and when you listen to certain music. Songza takes into account data; such as time of day, time of week, and the device you are using, to recommend playlists based on the moment.

“We’ve always been keen in figuring out the best way to help people discover music,” Davich previously told The Courier. “Music is something that people consume as a lifestyle enhancement. It’s not something people consume as a product.”

 

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Free music streaming service Songza has the beat for LIC Flea


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Songza

Whether you are working out at the gym or checking out the new LIC Flea in Long Island City, Songza has the right playlist for you.

Based in LIC, Songza is a free music streaming service that delivers the listener the right music at the right time through the biggest library of expertly-curated playlists via Android, iPod, iPad or PC. All the playlists are handpicked by music experts and DJs.

“We’ve always been keen in figuring out the best way to help people discover music,” said Eric Davich, Songza co-founder. “Music is something that people consume as a lifestyle enhancement. It’s not something people consume as a product.”

The music on the playlists on Songza, which on average feature 60 to 80 songs, are personalized to each listener based on implicit behavior, like pressing thumbs up or down to a song, or explicit behavior, such as when you listen to certain music. Songza takes into account data such as time of day, time of week and the device you are using to recommend playlists based on the specific moment.

“It would get you to the right music that would change your mood based on context and be able to evolve and stay fresh,” said Davich.

Songza, which now provides music in the United States and Canada, offered the music for opening day of the LIC Flea & International Food Bazaar featuring a fun mix of new summer tracks and mixing by DJ Jilly Hendrix and DJ Whitney Day.

“I’ve been to a lot of flea markets in my neighborhood, but I’ve never DJed at something like this before,” said Day, who just started working for Songza as a playlist curator. “It’s a rare occasion for DJs to set up their equipment outside. I’m always excited to play outside.”

A playlist is now featured on Songza just for the LIC Flea. It includes both crowd-pleasing pop songs and unknown emerging artists. The Songza headquarters will also be moving right next to the lot LIC Flea calls home.

“It will evolve as the Flea evolves and as more DJs play at the Flea,” said Davich. “We’re really excited it’s right in our backyard. It’s a really great event.”

To find your perfect playlist, visit www.songza.com or download the Songza app to your device.

LIC Flea is located at 5-25 46th Avenue in LIC. It is open every Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

 

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Courier hosts Power Breakfast on future of LIC’s tech boom


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Terence Cullen

Seth Pinsky, president of the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC), made clear that as business sectors based in the city move forward, technology will become more crucial.

“As we like to say at EDC: whereas in the past the technology industry was a sector; increasingly, today, the economy itself is the tech sector.”

Pinsky was a featured panelist for the “The Future of LIC: How the tech boom will affect you & your business!” — a power breakfast host by The Queens Courier in part with TD Bank — on Thursday, October 11, which gave a glimpse of what will become of the growing technology growth in Long Island City.

The breakfast played host to panelists: Carol Conslato, president of the Queens Chamber of Commerce and public affairs director for Con Edison; Andrew Kirby, president of Plaxall; Greg Pass, entrepreneurial officer for CornellNYC Tech; Jukay Hsu, founder of Coalition for Queens; Elias Roman, CEO and co-founder of Songza media; Elliot Park of Shine Electronics; and Gayle Baron, president of LIC Partnership. Featured elected officials who spoke included Congressmember Carolyn Maloney, State Senator Michael Gianaris and Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer.

Van Bramer kicked the morning off by noting that what was core to Long Island City were the arts and culture that had found a home in the region.

“Who in here believes that culture and the arts drives Long Island City,” Van Bramer asked the hundreds present and was answered with hundreds of applause.

Pinsky, head of the EDC since 2008, said it was important that the city take the lead in the ever-changing tech world. Some of the ways New York has begun to do that, he said, included the Cornell Tech Campus that will have a home on Roosevelt Island and incubators in Long Island City to boost start-ups and small businesses.

“First, the sector itself is a critical and growing sector,” Pinsky said. “We’re increasing employment, we’re seeing more economic activity, but I think that’s only half an answer. And that’s because the real reason why we’re so focused on the tech sector is that in the 21st century the tech sector will also be critical to the success of almost every other sector in our city’s economy. If our city doesn’t take a leadership in technology we’ll find it increasingly difficult to maintain our leadership position in anything else that we do.”

See photos from the event

As Cornell Tech, along with other satellite campuses across the city, begin to produce ambitious minded tech experts, they will most likely find a home in Long Island City because of its location and comparatively cheaper rent prices than Manhattan, several speakers said.

Plaxall over the last 20 years has fostered the art community that gradually grew in Long Island City, and now that community will be mixed with a technology community, said Kirby, who runs the real estate company with his cousin. The end result would be something Kirby said would be “amazing.”

“We already have the creative artists, now we can bring the creative technological people to Long Island City and to do that we need to do things that will make this an attractive area for them,” Kirby said. “I think Long Island City has the potential to be a location where we merge technology and art to create some amazing things.”

To attract the expected influx of techies, Plaxall is laying out plans for a community that could foster a merger between the arts and technology, Kirby said.

This community would be on 12 acres on the East River around what is known as the Anabel Basin. This community would include a mixed-use area of residential towers and buildings for technology companies, Kirby said. The vision for this area is to create “really a sustainable community where people can live, work and play that will attract the best and the brightest.”

Roman, the youngest speaker on the panel, said afterward that technology and culture had already become one in another and could open the doors for more and more potential.

“There’s an interesting intersection between technology and culture, where the technology becomes invisible and it’s all about the culture,” he said. “I think that’s a really exciting intersection to be at.”