Tag Archives: Scott Stringer

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST 

Tuesday: Mostly sunny this morning then becoming cloudy during the afternoon. High 19. Winds NW at 10 to 15 mph. Tuesday Night: Cloudy. Low 17. Winds WNW at 5 to 10 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Tuesday Morning Music Club of Douglaston

Pianist Hannah Wang plays two compositions by M. Ravel and two compositions by C. Debussy. Expect a guest artist and post-concert sandwich lunch. Starts at 11 a.m. at the Douglaston Community Church, 39-15, Douglaston Pkwy., 516-466-4034.

Reports critical of MTA

Three recent reports on the Metropolitan Transportation Authority including an audit by the NY State comptroller show mostly bad news for customers using Metro North, LIRR and the subways. Read more: Fox New York

Comptroller Scott Stringer urges Albany to let NYC set own minimum wage

New York City should have the power to set its own minimum wage, city Comptroller Scott Stringer told legislators in Albany on Monday. Read more: CBS New York

Pols hold hearings to stop hooker trade at Super Bowl

The Super Bowl is a “sex-trafficking magnet,” a congressman leading the fight against such exploitation warned at a House hearing Monday. Read more: New York Post

NBC News poll: Pessimism defines the state of the union

As President Barack Obama enters his sixth year in the White House, 68 percent of Americans say the country is either stagnant or worse off since he took office, according to the latest NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll. Read more: NBC New York

Folk singer, activist Pete Seeger dies in New York

Buoyed by his characteristically soaring spirit, the surging crowd around him and a pair of canes, Pete Seeger walked through the streets of Manhattan leading an Occupy Movement protest in 2011. Read more: AP

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Monday: A mix of clouds and sun during the morning will give way to cloudy skies this afternoon. High around 50. Winds S at 10 to 15 mph. Monday night: Cloudy skies. Low 42. Winds SSW at 10 to 20 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Oratorio Society of Queens Auditions

Experience the joy of choral singing. Reservations are required, call 718.279.3006. Temple Beth Sholom, 171-39 Northern Blvd., Flushing, 7:45 p.m., www.queensoratorio.org.

Rail agency developing train camera rule: senators

A federal rail safety agency plans to propose a rule that might require the installation of video cameras aboard trains to monitor drivers and record accidents or unsafe behavior, according to two U.S. senators who have pushed for the change. Read more: NBC New York

Bill de Blasio backing Mike’s fights in court

Mayor de Blasio is tossing his “tale of two cities’’ mantra out the window this week, as his Law Department begins defending two hallmarks of the Bloomberg legacy in court. Read more: New York Post

Stringer targets rich with bid to close tax hole

Scott Stringer, the Big Apple’s new comptroller, is ready to take another tax bite out of the city’s wealthiest business leaders. Read more: New York Post

Jewish groups gather to memorialize Ariel Sharon

Israelis from all walks of life are paying their final respects to Ariel Sharon. Read more: CBS New York/AP

Globes leader ‘American Hustle’ gets Oscar boost

The Golden Globes are typically Hollywood’s bawdiest awards show – “a wonderful mess,” said co-host Tina Fey of this year’s bash. But in the end, after all the boozy banter – some of it bleeped for broadcast – the 1970s corruption tale “American Hustle” got a very serious push toward Oscar glory, picking up three major awards. Read more: AP

De Blasio sworn in as 109th mayor of New York City


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photos via NYC Mayor's Office Flickr/Official Photos by New York City Mayor's Office

Updated 1:30 p.m.

The Bloomberg era has ended and the de Blasio administration has begun.

New York City’s 109th mayor, Bill de Blasio, was sworn in during a ceremony at his Park Slope, Brooklyn home just after midnight Wednesday, followed by a formal inauguration on the steps of City Hall later that day.

State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman officiated the New Year’s Eve oath of office, which was also attended by the mayor’s wife Chirlane McCray, daughter Chiara and son Dante.

“From the beginning, this has been our family together reaching out to the people of this city to make a change that we all needed. I want to thank you for having brought us to this moment,” de Blasio said after taking the oath in front of his home.

“To everyone this is the beginning of a road we will travel together,” he added.

Former President Bill Clinton swore in de Blasio on the steps of City Hall with a bible once owned by former President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

De Blasio previously served as a regional director in the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development during the Clinton administration and managed Hillary Clinton’s 2000 U.S. Senate campaign. Both endorsed de Blasio for mayor in the general election.

Before administering the oath, Clinton said it had been a “great joy” for his wife, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and him to see de Blasio’s progress “because he has served with such passion and because he represents with his family the future of our city and the future of our country.”

Telling New Yorkers “our work begins today,” in his inauguration speech de Blasio pledged to expand the pay sick leave law, require big developers to build affordable housing, stem the tide of hospital closures, reform a broken stop-and-frisk policy and ask the wealthy to pay a little more in taxes to provide universal, full-day pre-k and after-school programs for middle schoolers.

“We won’t wait, we’’ll do it now,” he said.

“Let me be clear: When I said I would take dead aim at the tale of two cities, I meant it. And we will do it.” he added.

A thousand tickets were reserved for the general public to attend the public swearing-in ceremony, with de Blasio pledging that it would be an “inauguration for all New Yorkers.”

Several dozen New Yorkers from across the city were additionally invited to join the mayor on stage. The group included a Queens engineer who emigrated from Bangladesh, according to de Blasio.

Mayor de Blasio takes the subway with his family to his City Hall inauguration.

Queens resident and the 2014 New York City Youth Poet Laureate, Ramya Ramana, read an original poem at the inauguration, which she dedicated to de Blasio.

Ramana, a first generation Indian-American, grew up in the borough and recently won the New York Knicks’ Poetry scholarship to St. John’s University, where she is a first-year student, according to the mayor.

Letitia James, who is succeeding de Blasio as public advocate was also sworn in at City Hall Wednesday. The councilmember is the first woman of color to hold citywide office. Scott Stringer, Manhattan Borough President since 2006, was sworn in as city comptroller, replacing John Liu.

 

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Op-ed: Support programs that boost our economy


| oped@queenscourier.com

ASSEMBLYMEMBER NILY ROZIC

One by one, each student marched his way up to the front of the room to receive certificates of completion, each with a sense of accomplishment and hopefulness. One by one, each member of the cohort recounting stories of the past couple of weeks that gave them a second chance.

It was the workforce development initiative of the Queens Botanical Garden and LaGuardia Community College that made these second chances possible.

Unlike some traditional programs that lack strong ties to industry, workforce development programs often accelerate job creation because workers acquire precisely the kind of skills businesses need to expand. Today, examples like those of the Green Jobs Training Program include sustainable landscape design and maintenance, waste management, and other similar green practices.

More recently, the Robin Hood Foundation provided funding to create a workforce development program run by AAFE and One Flushing to recruit and assist those ready to enter the workforce. It is a welcome partnership that will enhance the growth and success of our local Flushing community.

Beyond that New York needs to implement creative ways to retain the talent we have. This year, I sponsored legislation that was signed into law by Governor Andrew Cuomo making New York a national leader in workforce development and job training. I have also introduced legislation supported by Comptroller-elect Scott Stringer that would continue our economic growth and create quality jobs by investing in our engineering workforce. The financial aid program for engineering students who commit to staying in the city for five years after graduation is a smart investment to bolster an innovation economy and prepare our workforce for the 21st century.

This year’s budget also focused on workforce development and new industries in every community. Cuomo pushed for programs including innovative “Hot Spot” incubators, the Venture Capital Fund, and job linkage initiatives that push our state’s ideas, create new businesses, and train our workforce for jobs of tomorrow.

Queens is one of the most diverse counties in the entire country and it needs a government that can embrace and harness that to power its economic engine. We need to keep creating ways to support programs that boost our economy. The task for our next administration will be to help more of the city’s workforce develop the skills to obtain jobs—and more importantly careers—in sectors that are growing and expanding.

That is what I am determined to champion to do in next year’s legislative session—to be a champion of minority-owned and women-owned small businesses, provide resources to assist local businesses flourish, and forge better partnerships between private and public entities. There has never been a better time to support these pathways and programs that ultimately help our most critical economic resource–our workforce.

Assemblymember Nily Rozic represents New York’s 25th District, which spans the northeast portion of Queens, including the communities of Flushing, Queensboro Hill, Hillcrest, Fresh Meadows, Oakland Gardens, Bayside, and Douglaston.

 

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James makes history with public advocate win; Stringer elected as comptroller


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

File photos

The city has elected its new public advocate and comptroller— Letitia James and Scott Stringer.

Councilmember James’ win makes New York City history. As the next public advocate, she is the first woman of color to hold citywide office.

“Yes, this is indeed historic because our government must be representative of all New Yorkers,” James said in her victory speech.

“Although history is important and I am incredibly proud of what we’ve accomplished together, what I’m really proud of is of the fact that we ran a campaign centered on progressive ideals and a commitment to New York’s working families,” she added.

James, who faced no Republican in Tuesday’s general election, won with 84 percent of the vote, with 99 percent of the precincts reporting, according to unofficial results.

The November 5 election was the third time voters could cast their ballots for James in the public advocate race.

James placed first in the September Democratic primary with 36 percent of the vote, but it wasn’t enough to reach the 40 percent threshold needed to avoid a runoff.

In the October 1 runoff, James, who represents District 35, faced off against fellow Brooklyn politician State Senator Daniel Squadron. She won with 59.4 percent of the vote.

Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer did have a Republican opponent in the comptroller race, John Burnett, a former Wall Street executive, but easily won with 81 percent of the vote, with 99 percent of the precincts reporting, according to unofficial results.

“I want everyone in this city to know that I will be a comptroller who serves our city with honesty and integrity. A comptroller who listens to the voices of New Yorkers in all five boroughs so that we can work together in shaping the future of this great city,” Stringer said in his victory speech.

Like James, his biggest challenge came in the primary.

Stringer was looking at a guaranteed Democratic nomination until former governor Eliot Spitzer decided to enter the race in July.

Though Spitzer had the stigma of a prostitution scandal that forced him to resign as governor in 2008, initial polls showed him ahead. But in the days before the election, they rightfully predicted a close race. Stringer defeated Spitzer with 52.1 percent of the vote.

Updated 2:05 a.m.

 

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Stringer beats Spitzer in comptroller primary


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo via Twitter/@Stringer2013

Eliot Spitzer’s comeback failure was Scott Stringer’s political triumph in the comptroller primary Tuesday.

The Manhattan borough president beat the former governor, earning 52 percent of the vote with 98 percent of the precincts reporting, according to unofficial results.

“I will bring integrity to this office. I will bring experience and leadership. I will make sure that I make you proud,” said Stringer in his election night victory speech.

“And to the people of this city as I continue to get to know you, I want you to know I believe that public office can make a difference. I’ve believed that since I was a little kid. I believe it more than ever tonight.”

Stringer was looking at a guaranteed Democratic nomination until Spitzer decided to throw his hat in the ring.

Following on the heels of Anthony Weiner’s political comeback attempt, Spitzer entered the race less than a week before he had to collect 3,750 signatures from registered Democratic voters to make it onto the ballot.

He was able to meet that July 11 deadline with more than enough support.

Initial polls showed Spitzer ahead of Stringer, but in the days before the election, they showed the race was in too-close-to-call.

Though the former governor had the stigma of a prostitution scandal that forced him to resign in 2008, some argued his name recognition would give him an advantage.

But that advantage may not have worked for the polls that matter.

Stringer will go on to face Republican John Burnett, who has worked on Wall Street, Libertarian candidate and activist Hesham El-Meligy, and Green Party candidate and former school teacher Julia Willebrand in the November 5 general election.

In an additional twist to an already interesting election season, another potential opponent was former madam Kristin Davis.

Running as a Libertarian candidate, Davis spent time in jail for running her prostitution business, and said she provided woman to Spitzer, though those claims were never verified.

She was arrested in August for allegedly selling prescription drugs, and reportedly never filed petitions to get on the ballot.

Comptroller primary guide


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

File photo/Photo courtesy of Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer's Flickr

As the clock ticks closer to city primaries on Tuesday, September 10, The Courier would like to provide you, the reader and the voter, with a fair, detailed guide of who is running. Here is a list of the city comptroller primary candidates, who they are, what they stand for and what they want to continue to do if they go on to the general election in November.

Name: Eliot Spitzer

Party: Democrat

Current Position:  Former New York Governor

Personal Information: Eliot Spitzer began as a prosecutor of organized crime before becoming New York State attorney general in 1998. During his time as attorney general, Spitzer cracked down on the largest firms on Wall Street. In 2006, Spitzer became governor where he helped fully fund New York City schools and reformed state health care delivery to guarantee larger access for working families.

Issues/Platform: As attorney general and governor, Spitzer held Wall Street, big corporations, government and special interests accountable for their actions.  He hopes to continue doing the same as comptroller.

 

Name: Scott Stringer

Party: Democrat

Current Position: Manhattan Borough President

Personal Information: Born and raised in Washington Heights, Scott Stringer graduated from John Jay College of Criminal Justice. In 1992, he was elected into the New York State Assembly, representing Manhattan’s Upper West Side. In 2006, he became Manhattan Borough President where he has raised concern on issues ranging from government waste and mismanagement to creating economic opportunity for New York’s middle class. Stringer has also worked hard for equal rights and opportunities for all New Yorkers. He was one of the first co-sponsors of a 1995 bill to provide marriage equality, he passed landmark legislation protecting victims of domestic violence and helped establish a Manhattan Family Justice Center.  Stringer’s Bank On program helped more than 12,000 “unbanked” people in Manhattan sign up for bank accounts and participate in the city’s economy.

Issues/Platform: According to Stringer, in order for our economy to grow, the city must have a five borough transportation plan to connect residents to developing jobs and housing centers. Stringer has also outlined a plan to create a New York City infrastructure bank for mass transit in order to put the MTA on a stronger financial ground and allow capital projects to expand and update the area’s massive transportation network. He has promoted the integrity and professionalism of the pension fund and has worked to create more comprehensive risk assessment and management and further diversify pension investments to ensure the fund’s long term sustainability.  Scott has also created initiatives to promote greater transparency and accountability in the City budget process and to give New Yorkers a stronger voice in how government spends their tax dollars.

Editor’s Note: Requests for information from the candidates’ campaigns were not received as of press time, therefore this information was retrieved from the candidates’ campaign websites

 

MORE PRIMARY GUIDES

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Friday: Partly cloudy. High of 84. Winds from the SW at 5 to 10 mph. Friday night: Mostly cloudy in the evening, then overcast. Low of 72. Winds from the SSW at 5 to 10 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Jerks: The Show

This late-night comedy showcase at the Laughing Devil Comedy Club in LIC on Friday, August 30 at 10:30 p.m. features NYC’s finest, most eloquent & lovable jerks. Leave your weak friends at home, as this show will appeal to your darker comedy tastes. As a special bonus, House of Jerky will provide free samples to the audience. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Poll: Spitzer and Stringer locked in dead heat in race for comptroller

A new poll shows a dramatic falloff in support for former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer‘s comeback campaign to become New York City comptroller. He’s now tied with Democratic rival Scott Stringer. Read more: CBS New York/AP

Parts of the Rockaways will be open to swimmers for Labor Day weekend

This holiday weekend, parts of the Rockaways will have something for the first time all summer: swimmers. Read more: NY1

New proposal calls for inter-borough train connecting Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn

Transportation advocates hope New York City’s next mayor will take a fresh look at a bold idea — creating an inter-borough train that would link Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx. Read more: CBS New York

Mr. Softee takes a hard line on suspected imposter ice cream trucks

Mister Softee is creaming the counterfeiters.The ice cream company is suing four fakers who are pushing ice cream in Queens this summer from vehicles outfitted to look like real Mister Softee trucks complete with blue and white paint jobs, logos and decals. Read more: New York Daily News

NBC poll: Americans skeptical of U.S. intervention in Syria

Fifty percent of Americans say they oppose the United States taking military action against Syrian President Bashar Assad, and nearly eight-in-10 believe President Barack Obama should receive congressional approval before using any force, according to a new NBC News poll. Read more: NBC News 

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Friday: Mostly cloudy in the morning, then overcast. High of 84. Winds from the NNW at 10 to 15 mph. Friday night: Partly cloudy. Low of 66. Winds from the NE at 5 to 10 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: In the Mood for Love

The Museum of the Moving Image presents In the Mood for Love as part of a retrospective on Wong Kar-wai, the influential Hong Kong Second Wave filmmaker. This movie chronicles the intense friendship and sublimated desires between two mutually cuckolded neighbors in a tale of passion tragically thwarted. Starts at 7 p.m. Tickets for Friday evening screenings include admission to the Museum’s galleries, which are open until 8:00 p.m. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Cops looking for suspect who struck officer in Astoria  

A police officer on patrol in Astoria Thursday night was injured when a vehicle suspected in a robbery struck him as it tried to speed away, according to published reports. Read more: The Queens Courier

Police say attack on interracial couple in LIC not a hate crime

Cops say the attack on an interracial couple in Long Island City this past weekend was not a hate crime. Read more: The Queens Courier

Sandy victims say they’re being scammed by contractors

Some Breezy Point residents whose homes were damaged by water and fire during superstorm Sandy say they’re being scammed by the people they hired to help them rebuild. Read more: CBS New York 

Eliot Spitzer, Scott Stringer argue over credibility in comptroller debate

Manhattan Borough President ScottStringer tried to convince voters that he is the most credible choice for city comptroller, while former Gov. Eliot Spitzer touted his resume in the capital markets during a Democratic debate that grew tense at times Thursday night. Read more: CBS New York

Nasdaq trading halted for 3 hours

A mysterious glitch halted trading on the Nasdaq for three hours Thursday in the latest major electronic breakdown on Wall Street, embarrassing the stock exchange that hosts the biggest names in technology, including Apple, Microsoft and Google. Read more: AP

Bradley Manning becomes Chelsea Manning

By asking to be known as a woman named Chelsea, Bradley Manning has created a host of possible challenges for the military as the soldier began serving a 35-year prison sentence for giving secrets to WikiLeaks. Read more: AP

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Tuesday: Overcast with a chance of a thunderstorm and rain showers. High of 81. Winds from the SSW at 5 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 70% with rainfall amounts near 0.3 in. possible. Tuesday night: Overcast with a chance of a thunderstorm and a chance of rain in the evening, then partly cloudy. Low of 63. Winds from the WNW at 5 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 40%.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Gerardo Contino y Los Habaneros

Come see a free live performance by Gerardo Contino y Los Habaneros at Gantry Plaza State Park at 7 p.m. Gerardo Contino was the lead singer for NG La Banda, one of the most recognized salsa and jazz orchestras in Cuba. Since arriving in the US in 2009, he has led his own group. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Spitzer, Stringer get personal at comptroller candidates’ debate

New York City comptroller candidates Eliot Spitzer and Scott Stringer traded heated barbs Monday night in their second debate. Read more: CBS New York

Paul Vallone gets big nod for council seat from former rival Kevin Kim

Politics is again making strange bedfellows. Former Democratic primary rivals Kevin Kim and Paul Vallone, who faced off in the bitter 2009 City Council race, may soon hit the campaign trail together as Kim formally endorsed Vallone for the open northeast Queens seat, the News has learned. Read more: New York Daily News

New institute in Jamaica Bay will study flooding

Queens will on the cutting edge of global warming research thanks to a new think tank unveiled by federal and city officials Monday. Read more: New York Daily News

New York City firefighter accused of strangling, harassing wife

A New York City firefighter is under arrest, facing charges in an apparent domestic dispute with his wife. Read more: ABC New York

CVS requires ID for nail polish remover

One of the active ingredients in nail polish remover is acetone. Read more: Fox New York

Stringer wants to create Sandy Audit Bureau if elected comptroller


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Maggie Hayes

Manhattan Borough President and City Comptroller candidate Scott Stringer announced a plan to create a Sandy Audit Bureau within the Comptroller’s office if elected.

The Sandy unit, a team of “professionals and experts,” would track the incoming $15 billion in federal aid and ensure the post-storm recovery money is spent “wisely and efficiently.”
Stringer said when that amount of money comes in, there must be a “laser focus on every single dollar.”

“Nine months after Sandy, the winds have subsided but we still have to confront the challenge of protecting our shoreline communities from the next great storm,” Stringer said. “The Comptroller’s office is uniquely positioned to serve as the city’s watchdog over all Sandy-related funds.”

Furthermore, Stringer plans to provide an online resource, The Sandy Tracker, that will allow residents to follow how the city is spending storm-related dollars. In the event of fraud or abuse, there will be an established 24-hour hotline for taxpayers to report any instances of the sort.

“Since Sandy, the Rockaways has seen an increased flow of resources dedicated to addressing post-storm issues,” said State Senator James Sanders. “Merely having these resources, however, is not enough. There needs to be a system of accountability.”

Sanders, Councilmember Donovan Richards and Assemblymember Phillip Goldfeder joined Stringer during his announcement on Tuesday, August 6 and reiterated their endorsements for Stringer’s candidacy.

“Every penny that was raised for Sandy victims and every government dollar that was spent during the relief and recovery effort must be accounted for,” Goldfeder said.
Richards said his constituents simply want “a hand up, not a hand out.”

“This is a common sense bureau,” he said. “During our recovery, accountability and transparency are extremely important.”

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Friday: Partly cloudy. High of 82. Winds from the NNW at 10 to 15 mph. Friday night: Partly cloudy. Low of 72. Winds less than 5 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: 35th annual Thunderbird American Indian Mid-Summer Pow Wow

The Queens County Farm Museum will be hosting the 35th annual Thunderbird American Indian Mid-Summer Pow Wow from Friday, July 26 – Sunday, July 28. New Yorkers are invited to experience intertribal Native American dances that include 40 distinct tribes in addition to Native American cuisine, art, jewelry and craft. Gates open at 6 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Admission for adults is $15 for an all-weekend pass and $5 for children ages 12 and younger. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Anthony Weiner sexting partner comes forward

Anthony Weiner said Thursday that he’d traded racy messages with as many as three women since similar sexting forced him out of Congress. Read more: AP

Former Queens City Councilman Eric Gioia slapped with $72,000 fine for violating campaign finance laws

Former Queens city councilman Eric Gioia on Thursday got slammed with a wallet-busting $72,402 fine for violating a slew of campaign finance laws while running for public advocate in 2009. Read more: New York Daily News 

MTA to spend $165 million on 300 new buses

The MTA will spend $165 million to buy 300 new buses that will be manufactured in upstate New York. Read more: New York Daily News

Polls shows Spitzer continues to lead in comptroller race

A pair of polls show that Eliot Spitzer still has a lead in his bid for the city comptroller’s office – but according to one survey, challenger Scott Stringer is well within striking distance. Read more: NY1

Juror says she owes Trayvon Martin’s family an apology

The only minority on the all-female jury that voted to acquit George Zimmerman said today that Zimmerman “got away with murder” for killing Trayvon Martin and feels she owes an apology Martin’s parents. Read more: ABC News