Tag Archives: Scott Stringer

Op-ed: The modern family and the fight for a 21st-century workplace

By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com


“Work/life balance is part of the reason why I’m leaving New York this year.”

Those were the parting words of a full-time employee from Sunnyside, Queens—one of more than 1,100 New Yorkers who recently took a survey from my office about workplace policies in the five boroughs.

The results of the survey show that the need to reshape the 21st-century workplace could not be more urgent, with a clarion call for “right to request” legislation, paid family leave and advance notification of schedules.

Forty-five percent of respondents reported not having access to flexible work arrangements (FWAs). Of those, more than three-quarters (77 percent) said their lives would be “more manageable” if such policies were in place.

Furthermore, among those workers at companies where FWAs were not widely available, 58 percent reported being “uncomfortable” or “very uncomfortable” requesting a flexible schedule. That’s why I support Council legislation that would allow employees to seek flexible schedules, without fear of retaliation.

In addition, the survey showed how a lack of paid family leave has had a profound impact on New York families. While the majority of respondents have had to take time off work to care for loved ones at various times, only 11 percent took paid family leave and nearly a quarter were forced to take unpaid leave.

No New Yorker should ever have to choose between holding down a job and taking care of loved ones. Luckily, there is a solution we can enact right here in the Empire State—a paid family leave system that would be funded by employee payroll deductions of no more than 45 cents a week in the first year.

80 percent of respondents supported such a system, with 86 percent of believing that fathers and mothers deserve an equal amount of paid family leave.

Lastly, we must address last-minute scheduling practices that too often prevent shift workers from securing child care, engaging in job training and higher education, and being able to care for their families.

Nearly 20 percent of shift workers in our survey received their schedule with only one day of notice. That’s hurting Gotham’s families and our economy.

I’ve called on the New York City Council to pass a law requiring that workers receive their schedule at least 72 hours in advance of their shift.

Whether it is providing a more equitable workplace for women, ensuring that business can secure talent, or enabling New Yorkers to better themselves through education, the conclusion is clear: government and the private sector must embrace family-friendly workplace policies as critical components of New York City’s economic competitiveness in the 21st century.

Scott M. Stringer is the comptroller of the City of New York


City Comptroller rejects Pan Am homeless shelter proposal for a third time

| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com


Updated 2:15 p.m.

For the city’s Department of Homeless Services (DHS), the third time was not a charm.

City Comptroller Scott Stringer has once again rejected the agency’s proposal, which was submitted twice before, to convert the former Pan American Hotel located at 79-00 Queens Blvd. into a permanent homeless shelter.

“The Comptroller’s Office rejected for the third time a permanent contract for Samaritan Village Inc. to operate a shelter at the Pan American Hotel. We have asked the Department of Homeless Services to revise its plan to address outstanding health and safety violations,” said Eric Sumberg, spokesman for Stringer.

The emergency homeless shelter at the former Elmhurst hotel was supposed to close last December, yet even after facing large opposition from community members, an application was submitted to convert it into a permanent shelter under a five-year, $42 million contract with DHS.

This third rejection comes after Stringer already sent the proposal back to DHS in July and May citing that changes, such as clearing all outstanding violations and complaints, needed to be made before he considered accepting.

Congresswoman Grace Meng applauded Stringer’s decision and voiced her opinion on the proposed shelter.

“I thank the comptroller for once again saying no to this ill-conceived plan,” Meng said. “Perhaps the third time will be the charm. Perhaps the Department of Homeless Services (DHS) and Samaritan Village will finally get the message that this is not an appropriate site for a homeless shelter.”

Meng also added that she urges the DHS to not resubmit the proposal once again and instead to look for another site.

“As I have said, it is imperative that we address the needs of the homeless in our city. But those in shelters deserve to be housed in a clean, safe and well-maintained environment, and this facility is not that. This location has been plagued with numerous problems and poor conditions that have not served the homeless well,” she continued. “In fact, it’s been a disservice to the homeless. I urge DHS to not resubmit its proposal for a fourth time. The agency should instead focus on finding a more suitable location that can better address the needs of New York’s homeless population.”

Local grassroots organization Elmhurst United, which has been against the proposed homeless shelter since day one, also thanked Stringer for his decision and continued to note violations such as an expired Certificate of Occupancy and non-compliance of the city Administrative Code requiring a cooking facility in each unit at the site.

“DHS’ strategy of rapidly increasing the number of shelters is not a viable solution. Permanent housing where one can call home is the only solution. Recent studies highlight the detrimental impact and the long lasting scars homelessness has on children. These children need a secure and stable environment, not a transient one,” the organization said in a statement. “Rent subsidy programs must be reinstated so that these families are placed in permanent housing and close to their home base. The Pan Am shelter has proven to be an unworkable and unfit site. We urge DHS to stop warehousing homeless families at that Pan Am site and to place them in permanent housing instead.”


Queens workers owed $800K in unclaimed back wages: comptroller

| agiudice@ridgewoodtimes.com

Photo via Scott Stringer's Facebook page

With Labor Rights Week quickly approaching, City Comptroller Scott Stringer scored a victory for city workers when he found $3.7 million as part of unclaimed prevailing wage settlements with several companies that worked on city-funded projects.

Stringer is now seeking the public’s help in identifying the over 1,000 workers from across the city to whom these funds are owed.

Throughout Queens, 200 individuals are owed nearly $800,000, according to Stringer’s findings.

In Corona, 20 people are owed a total of $117,470.53; Elmhurst has 18 individuals who are owed $74,934.79; and in Maspeth, Ridgewood and Jackson Heights, 14 people from each neighborhood are owed a total of $151,811.21.

“My office has recovered millions of dollars through our enforcement of the prevailing wage, but now we need your help to connect these workers with the money they are owed,” Stringer said. “Thousands of hard-working individuals, many of whom are immigrants, have been cheated out of their rightfully earned wages, but they may not know these funds exist. Help us get the word out about unclaimed wages — recovering thousands of dollars may only be a phone call or email away.”

Stringer’s office is trying to identify those who are owed wages through social media, media partnerships and distribution of informational flyers in several languages including English, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Russian and Creole in neighborhoods throughout the city.

“We’re ramping up our efforts to identify these hard-working men and women who are owed the money they earned,” the comptroller said. “In the coming weeks, we’ll be on the streets, on social media and on the airwaves with a single message: if you’ve been cheated out of your wages, the comptroller’s office has your back. Tell your friends and family: call our hotline or visit our website to see if you are eligible to receive your lost wages.”

The prevailing wage laws require employers to pay workers the wage and benefit rate set annually by the comptroller when those employees work on city public works projects, such as renovating public schools or building service contracts, which includes security guard and custodial work, with city agencies.

Workers who believe they may be entitled to unclaimed wages can call the comptroller’s hotline at 212-669-4443, send in inquiries via email to laborlaw@comptroller.nyc.gov or check the comptroller’s unclaimed wages website.


South Ozone Park juvenile detention center approved, but operators investigated

| amatua@queenscourier.com

Photo via Facebook/Stop The Prison in S.O.P.

Just when South Ozone Park residents thought the fight to stop the placement of a juvenile detention center was close to being won, City Comptroller Scott Stringer on Tuesday approved a limited contract submitted by Sheltering Arms and the Administration of Children’s Services (ACS) to erect a Close to Home facility in the area.

Stringer, who previously denied the contract due to various undisclosed inconsistencies in June, also announced that he is reviewing the agency’s “use of improper payment methods in the contracting and construction of these facilities,” according to a press release.

South Ozone Park residents have been vocal about their opposition to the juvenile detention center and have even filed a lawsuit, along with the South Ozone Park Civic Association West, to stop the process. ACS is planning to open the 18-bed limited secure facility at 133-23 127 St. near another Close to Home center and the Skyway Men’s Shelter.

Councilman Ruben Wills, who has worked with residents to stop the opening, said Stringer’s approval of the contract was bound to happen.

“The process of reviewing city contracts is not infinite,” Wills said. “We knew the comptroller would eventually be compelled to register Sheltering Arms’ limited secure contract with ACS. So, we thank him for his due diligence with respect to that matter. Nonetheless, our fight lives on.”

The comptroller also announced that a newly formed Research and Investigation Unit will focus on irregular contracting and payment methods associated with limited secure placement facilities after discovering that several city agencies, including ACS, were using a payment method called PON1 meant for non-procurement expenditures.

The payment method allowed ACS and other city agencies to evade rules required for contracts by service providers, which would normally go through a bidding process, essentially spending millions of taxpayer dollars improperly, according to Stringer’s office.

“The city did an end-run around procurement rules when they set up, paid for and prepared facilities for use as Close to Home juvenile detention centers,” Stringer said. “We are going to investigate this program to determine the financial implications of the breakdown in the contracting process.”

According to a spokesperson for ACS, the agency “has investigated and corrected its payment practices” and has worked with Stringer’s office to register the contracts of the three nonprofit service providers that lacked appropriate contracts.

Community Board 10 Chairperson Betty Braton said she knows that Stringer did everything he could to prevent the registration of the contract for as long as he could.

“Am I happy with it? No, but I understand why,” Braton said. “We will be continuing to work with Council member Wills, with the Department of Buildings and every agency in any way shape or form involved to find avenues that we can pursue to prevent its opening.”

South Ozone Park residents have come together to hold rallies every Saturday to voice their opposition and have created a group called Stop The Prison in S.O.P. to petition the city.

“You can’t afford to be a spectator in this fight,” the group said in a Facebook post. “Think about what is going to happen to our community should this place open.”


Three major Queens roadways led city in costly pothole claims: Stringer

| rpozarycki@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File photo

Queens streets have gone to pot.

Potholes on three major arteries serving Queens cost the city tens of millions of dollars in accident claims over the last six years, according to City Comptroller Scott Stringer.

In a “ClaimStat alert” he issued on Thursday, Stringer said the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway, along with the Grand Central and Belt parkways, accounted for a combined 1,561 claims between the 2010 and 2015 fiscal years, leading all other roadways in the five boroughs.

Back in February, the Department of Transportation (DOT) reported that Queens had the most potholes in the entire city.

The Belt Parkway, in particular, proved to resemble Swiss cheese more than a street, as the report pointed out that it “had the most pothole claims in four of the six years examined…making it by far the most pot-holed roadway in the city.”

Damages to vehicles that hit potholes on streets citywide cost taxpayers nearly $1.5 million in claims the city settled with drivers over the six-year period, Stringer noted. An additional 2,681 personal injury claims resulting from potholes and pedestrian falls on defective roadways were settled for $136.3 million during the same period.

The comptroller indicated that the alert gives the DOT a “road map” for making proper repairs well in advance of the winter weather that precipitates the creation of potholes.

“Potholes are serious trouble,” Stringer said in a statement. “They deflate tires, break axles and twist ankles, often at a significant financial cost to the city.”

According to the report, the common settlement for pothole damages to vehicles was $500, with 76 percent of all settlements amounting to $1,000 or less. Queens had a total of 3,590 pothole claims on its streets.

For personal injury claims related to slips, trips and falls on defective roadways, the city paid an average of between $2 and $9 million, with a plurality of them (48 percent) costing $5,000 or less. Only 211 settlements during the period were of $100,000 or greater.

Not surprisingly, pothole and personal injury claims related to defective streets spiked in years when winter weather wreaked havoc on New York City. Higher claims were also reported in areas of the city where the majority of households own a car, including much of eastern and southwest Queens. Sixty-four percent of Queens households, in total, have at least one vehicle.

As with the most recent winter, the DOT went on a “pothole blitz” across the five boroughs whenever the weather was fair enough to allow for emergency street repairs. The city is also experimenting with a different asphalt formula containing rubber which it hopes will prove more durable.

Stringer’s report, however, suggested that the DOT should consider whether some streets particularly prone to potholes should be completely reconstructed. It also called on the city to re-examine its road resurfacing procedures to make sure the best practices are followed.


City comptroller sends back Pan American shelter contract

| rpozarycki@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Angy Altamirano

Plans to make the former Pan American Hotel in Elmhurst a permanent homeless shelter hit a roadblock Monday when City Comptroller Scott Stringer refused to sign a city contract for its operation.

The Department of Homeless Services (DHS) and the nonprofit group Samaritan Village previously agreed upon a five-year, $42.4 million contract formally establishing 79-00 Queens Blvd. as a permanent transitional housing shelter.

Stringer, however, sent the contract back to the mayor’s office as a result of concerns regarding conditions at the Pan American. The NY Daily News reported earlier this month that the shelter was suffering from vermin infestation. Last week, a fire also broke out in one of the units. There were no injuries reported, but the family in the affected unit was forced to relocate to another shelter.

The comptroller similarly voided a DHS contract for another shelter in Manhattan.

The comptroller vowed not to approve the contract until his office “receives assurances that anyone staying in these facilities will be safe” and “all outstanding violations and complaints have been corrected.”

“In March, the NYC Department of Investigation released a report that highlighted unacceptable living conditions in our city’s shelters and raised significant issues about how the Department of Homeless Services identifies and cures health and safety violations,” Stringer said in a statement. “We simply can and must do better on behalf of the 60,000 people, including nearly 25,000 children, who are under our care.”

The announcement came hours after Mayor Bill de Blasio announced in Corona the creation of an inter-agency shelter repair squad designed to find and correct any violations in city homeless shelters.

Stringer applauded the mayor for the announcement and added he is looking forward “to working closely with this group to meaningfully change the way the city procures and operates our homeless shelters.”


Build it Back: The story behind the frustration

By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com


When Superstorm Sandy hit our city more than two years ago, the damage was more than we could bear: 48 New Yorkers died, thousands of homes were devastated and damages totaled more than $20 billion.

The continuing damage from the storm can be seen today in Breezy Point and the Rockaways, and many other communities in Queens that bore the brunt of Sandy’s winds and waves. Many neighborhoods have not been fully rebuilt and individual homeowners are still desperately seeking assistance.

This past week, my office released an audit of Build it Back, the city’s program designed to help victims repair or rebuild their homes after the storm. We looked long and hard at the data to try to determine why so few people had received the help they desperately needed from this program.

The problem had its roots in the immediate aftermath of the storm, when the city’s Housing Recovery Office (HRO) hired numerous contractors to manage the relief effort. We found that HRO paid $6.8 million to inexperienced consultants who were paid in full despite processing more than 5,000 applications for aid that were incomplete and had to be returned for additional information. The faulty application process increased delays in distributing benefits, wasted money and created mounting frustration for those seeking help.

Our audit also found that HRO authorized more than $245,000 for double billing of work that had already been completed. It paid $1.2 million for consultant hours submitted without hourly or weekly records and more than $74,000 for travel expenses that couldn’t be documented.
If the recovery was a field day for consultants, it was a nightmare for victims. Determined to rebuild their homes, many were routinely shuffled from one staff person at Build it Back to the next, most of whom were not familiar with their cases. A survey of applicants found that nearly half could not provide basic information about the program and many employees were not qualified to do the job they had.

The audit was enhanced by what we’d heard firsthand last year when we hosted six public hearings across the city in communities hardest hit by the storm, including Breezy Point and the Rockaways. Hundreds of victims told us heartbreaking stories about a recovery effort that ignored them, failed to provide basic information and delivered little or no aid. Our audit confirmed much of what they had to say.

The good news is that Mayor de Blasio’s administration has improved the program and progress has been made. By March of this year, some 29 percent of the people who applied for aid had at least selected the kind of relief for which they’re applying.

But problems remain. One of our most distressing findings is that several contractors who failed to help victims are still on the job, operating without formal contracts, largely unaccountable to city taxpayers. Without these contracts in place, we have little leverage over what their costs will be, and not enough transparency and oversight over how well they’re doing their job.

Our audit’s key recommendation is that the city must take the lead in disaster recovery. Contracting out our most crucial tasks means that profit can be put before people, which is exactly what happened after Sandy. That was unacceptable, and the message this audit sends to city leaders is that it must never happen again.


Buildings Department approves revised Glendale shelter construction plans

| rpozarycki@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

While the battle over the proposed Glendale homeless shelter is far from over, the Department of Buildings (DOB) gave its blessing to the shelter’s revised blueprints.

The DOB approved on April 2 amended building plans to convert a long-defunct factory at 78-16 Cooper Ave. into a hotel with 70 dwelling units. In March, the agency approved plans for 103 units but quickly reversed course and withheld them for further review.

Issues stemmed from the previous classification of the site as “lodging,” but the revised plans approved on April 2 describe the building as a class B hotel. This change would allow operation of a hotel as-of-right, without requiring changing the location’s manufacturing zoning, which would involve a public review process.

The Department of Homeless Services (DHS) previously reached a five-year, $27 million agreement with the nonprofit Samaritan Village to operate a homeless shelter for up to 125 families at the factory site. Its owner, Michael Wilner, is reportedly leasing the site to Samaritan Village and is responsible for the factory’s renovation.

While construction may take place at the shelter site, the contract itself must be approved by City Comptroller Scott Stringer before it can be used as a homeless shelter. A spokeperson for Stringer told The Courier his office has yet to receive the contract, and therefore has yet to make the decision.

Meanwhile, the fight goes on for community activists opposed to the shelter’s opening. Community Board 5 District Manager Gary Giordano said in a phone interview the advisory body would file a formal challenge of the plans with the Buildings Department. The public has until about May 11 in order to officially file a challenge with the agency.

“We will do some consultations with attorneys and try to make the best of it,” Giordano said.

The Glendale Middle Village Coalition, a group of civic and business organizations, continues to raise funds for its legal challenges to the plan.

It previously filed an Article 78 proceeding against the DHS’ environmental assessment which determined that 78-16 Cooper Ave. — used for industrial manufacturing for decades and located adjacent to a chemical storage facility — is safe for reuse as a shelter.

The coalition hopes a judge’s ruling will force the DHS to perform an environmental impact study on the site, which could cost millions and take several years to complete.


Op-ed: An equal shot at justice for all New Yorkers

By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com


New York City is — and always has been — a place of opportunity for immigrants. We are home to over 200 spoken languages, and the people who have come here from around the world helped build this city. We have welcomed them for hundreds of years.

Diversity is our greatest strength, but it must be protected and preserved. That’s why I was greatly concerned during a recent visit to the Bronx Housing Court to find that most signs were posted only in English. Translation services were lacking, and Help Centers did not provide services in enough languages.

This is exclusion of the worst sort — an insult to thousands of non-English-speaking New Yorkers who in many cases have come to Housing Court because they are threatened with eviction or foreclosure. Justice is hard to find in a courthouse that confuses the people it’s supposed to serve, and you shouldn’t lose a battle to save your home just because you have limited English proficiency.

Unfortunately that’s what too many New Yorkers are facing, not just in the Bronx but throughout the city. Immediately after my tour, our office visited Housing Courts in all five boroughs to examine the state of multilingual services, and we found similar problems.
In Brooklyn, the signs leading to interpreters are small and poorly marked. In Queens, signs offering interpretation services are only in English. In Manhattan, the first signs you see upon entering the courthouse are in English only.

In some courts, people wait hours for an interpreter. Sometimes they’re told to come back another day. As a result, hardworking New Yorkers are often pressured by landlord attorneys to cut deals in hallway negotiations — and to give up their rights — without the benefit of an interpreter. This is absolutely unacceptable, and it must end now.

Just as the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that non-English-speaking residents have a right to bilingual education, we have an obligation to make sure that our courts provide services in more than one language. To achieve these reforms, I’ve sent a letter to Chief Administrative Judge Gail Prudenti, calling for improved language access and offering recommendations for important changes.

But we’re not stopping there. I’m joining forces with a coalition of housing rights and legal advocates, as well as with the City Council and Speaker Mark-Viverito, to push for improvements in all five boroughs. Because there is no time to wait when it comes to basic civil rights.

New York City is home to nearly 2 million people with limited English proficiency — and our judicial system is failing them. For too long, our courts have been nickel and diming New Yorkers who don’t speak English. I hope you’ll join with me in fighting for language access rights, so we can bring greater justice to our Housing Court.


Stringer starts to make offers to settle flood claims

By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com


The city comptroller has begun making offers to Lindenwood residents who suffered damaged to their homes due to the April 30 malfunction of the Spring Creek sewer facility, which is run by the city’s Department of Environmental Protection.

“As of this week, the comptroller’s office has started making offers of settlements to flooding victims, while inspections of additional homes continue,” a spokeswoman from City Comptroller Scott Stringer’s office said.

It was unclear how many offers were made or whether any were accepted.

Victims were urged by Stringer during a community meeting in May to make sure they filed claims.

“Engineers from his office moved swiftly through the area and inspected more than 100 homes alleged to be damaged by that flood,” the spokeswoman said.





DEP prolonging wait for compensation in Lindenwood flooding

By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Salvatore Licata


The Department of Environmental Protection has blocked compensation for Lindenwood homeowners whose homes were flooded after a screw-up at a plant run by the agency, residents charged.

The April 30 rainstorm, which caused major flooding to homes that border Spring Creek, was due to a malfunction in the Creek’s sewer overflow facility, operated by the DEP.

The agency has taken blame for the mishap but, despite the assurances of politicians, residents who were affected have yet to see any money from the government, which has many of them outraged.

“Where’s our check?” shouted residents to DEP officials at a meeting of the Howard Beach Lindenwood Civic Association Tuesday night. “It’s your fault.”

The DEP went door to door handing out claim forms to the flood-affected residents. But the money cannot be disbursed until the DEP submits its final report assessing damages suffered and liability.

The agency sent Stringer a preliminary report on June 19, nearly two months after the flood.

The DEP said it needs to check the water elevations to see where the flooding occurred and said there may be further delay because of liability issues involving some independent contractors.

Until both issues are resolved, the DEP cannot fully assess who suffered from the flood and who is liable, said DEP Deputy Commissioner Vincent Sapienza.

Even though no claims have been looked at yet the DEP is still urging residents who have not filed one to do so immediately.

“There is a 90 day period after the storm to file a claim,” Sapienza said. He added that no matter how long the reports take to process this is the only way residents could possibly receive a compensation check.

Since the flooding occurred the DEP has changed protocol on how to handle large storms that may cause an overflow of the system, Sapienza said. They will now have workers at the facilities, such as the one at Spring Creek, who can override the computerized system and open the flood gates. This allows untreated water to flow into Jamaica Bay, which normally happens when the facility overflows, thus relieving the system.



Queens Library board votes against turning over documentation

By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

The Board of Trustees of the Queens Borough Public Library voted against turning over all the records requested by the city comptroller’s office, sparking condemnation from politicians.

The vote, which took place on April 8, rejected a resolution submitted by members of the Board, and instead passed a resolution to release all requested financial documentation in accordance with a 1997 court-ordered agreement between the Queens Library and comptroller’s office.

The library, in a statement, defended the vote, saying it “believes in accountability and transparency.”

“The library has released all requested financial documentation in accordance with the court-ordered agreement of 1997. The audit rules have been the standard for several previous administrations. It appropriately includes audit authority over every dime provided by the city, fines and fees collected and book sale funds. As an additional layer of transparency, the library voluntarily provided access to the Worker’s Compensation Fund as requested.”

Additionally, the institution wrote to the city’s Independent Budget Office on Friday, requesting a review and analysis of its capital program, according to a library spokeswoman Joanne King.

In April, Comptroller Scott Stringer filed a lawsuit seeking to nullify the 1997 agreement, according to published reports. In late January, Stringer announced that he would perform a comprehensive audit of the city’s three library systems that would “examine a broad range of fiscal controls,” including the funding of capital improvements, the use of city tax levy funds and the oversight role of the library systems’ individual boards of trustees.

The announcement came after news reports revealed Queens Library President and CEO Tom Galante’s salary and that he spent nearly $140,000 to renovate his office, while many workers have been let go in recent years.

Borough President Melinda Katz penned a letter to Mayor Bill de Blasio in March, asking him to suspend the ability of the library to spend any funds on renovations until the issues are resolved.

“No public entity is above the law. Parliamentary maneuvers may buy them some time, but rest assured that I am determined to make sure that taxpayers know how their money is being spent at this library system,” Stringer said.
Katz also criticized the Board of Trustees’ decision saying it “has put itself firmly on the wrong side of any resident of Queens who wishes to see their library run properly.”




De Blasio announces Sandy recovery overhaul

| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo: Ed Reed for the Office of Mayor Bill de Blasio

Mayor Bill de Blasio announced a major overhaul to speed up Sandy recovery Thursday, along with the release of a detailed report on the city’s response to the storm.

The report includes recommendations that are expected to provide financial relief to businesses and homeowners, and revamp current recovery programs, the mayor said, as well as details on the city’s infrastructure rebuilding and storm mitigation efforts.

“We can’t stand idly by as red tape and bureaucratic bottlenecks prevent far too many New Yorkers from getting the relief they need. That’s why, from day one, we prioritized more efficient recovery,” de Blasio said. “And now, we’ve laid out a blueprint to provide critical financial relief to homeowners and directly engage communities in the rebuilding process—all while continuing our work to ensure a stronger and more resilient New York.”

Part of the engagement process will involve appointing borough directors in Queens, Brooklyn and Staten Island, who will have the authority to direct city agencies to increase community engagement and coordination, and bringing Build It Back staff directly into affected communities, according to the mayor’s administration.

“These latest announcements from the administration have brought new hope to many of our residents who have been displaced and are fighting to put their lives back together and move forward,” Borough President Melinda Katz said. “My office will continue to focus resources on the issues and challenges still outstanding for these residents, so we may collectively find solutions.”

The report additionally highlights other improvements the mayor announced last month to Build It Back, a federally-funded program to assist those whose homes, offices and other properties were damaged by Sandy.

Comptroller Scott Stringer also just announced the formation of a Sandy oversight unit and an audit of the Build It Back program.

“It is critical to have an accounting of how government has responded to this event, and what we can do to better prepare for the future,” he said.

Stringer also said that he will be holding town hall meetings in affected neighborhoods during the upcoming months to get community input on what his office should be examining as it comes up with an audit plan of issues on the city’s Sandy response.

The meetings will include the following locations in Queens, with future town halls to be announced for June:

April 30, 6-8 p.m., Bay House, 500 Bayside Dr., Breezy Point

May 20, 6-8 p.m., Mt. Carmel Baptist Church, 348 Beach 71st St., Arverne

For updates on town halls, click here.



Queens’ Morning Roundup

| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup


Thursday: Mostly sunny. High 51. Winds ENE at 10 to 20 mph. Thursday night: Mainly clear. Low 36. Winds ENE at 10 to 15 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Happy Hour with QNSMADE & SingleCut Beersmiths

Come hang out at SingleCut Beersmiths in Astoria and try some locally made Queens craft beer. QNSMADE’s mission is to give a voice to the people that make up this borough and provide a space to bring together all the amazing things that are happening in the many pockets of Queens. With seven days left to go on its Kickstarter,  let’s come together and make this happen. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Police arrest man accused of making anti-Muslim statements toward teen on Queens bus

A man wanted for making anti-Muslim statements toward a 15-year-old girl aboard a Queens bus while spiting at the teen and threatening to punch her has been arrested, cops said. Read more: The Queens Courier

Bratton issues new guidelines for jaywalking stops 

Less than four months after officers started cracking down on jaywalkers in New York City, Police Commissioner Bill Bratton is telling officers to use more discretion when stopping people who cross the street illegally, according to law enforcement sources. Read more: NBC New York

EXCLUSIVE: City Controller Scott Stringer launching audit of Build it Back Hurricane Sandy home re-building program

The City’s troubled Build it Back program, which has only served a handful of Hurricane Sandy victims since the 2012 natural disaster struck, is going under the microscope. Read more: New York Daily News

Plane evacuated at JFK Airport after bomb threat: officials

A plane was evacuated at John F. Kennedy International Airport Wednesday evening after a bomb threat was made, officials say. Read more: NBC New York

Contract talks heat up between transit workers, MTA

Transit workers came closer to making a deal with the MTA Tuesday more than two years after their labor contract expired, union sources told The Post. Read more: New York Post

Queens’ Morning Roundup

| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup


Thursday: Snow, heavy at times, will become mixed with sleet or freezing rain this afternoon. Temps nearly steady in the mid 30s. Winds NE at 25 to 35 mph. 5 to 8 inches of snow and ice expected. Thursday night: A wintry mix this evening will transition to mainly snow overnight. Low 32. Winds N at 20 to 30 mph. Snow and ice accumulating 3 to 5 inches.

EVENT OF THE DAY: The Unlikely Ascent of Sybil Stevens

The Secret Theatre is pleased to announce a three week limited engagement of Kari Bentley-Quinn’s production of “The Unlikely Ascent of Sybil Stevens,” directed by New Voices Co-Director Christopher Diercksen. Main character Sybil Stevens is a Chicago-based flight attendant who finds her life completely changed when she is the sole survivor of a devastating plane crash, and has to deal with the unexpected aftereffects of both the crash and her newfound fame. The Secret Theater is located at 44-02 23rd Street in LIC. Shows on Thursday, Friday and Saturday start at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 3 p.m. Tickets are $18. Through Feb. 23. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Cuomo says de Blasio pre-K tax plan is unfair to rest of state

Mayor de Blasio’s tax-the-rich plan to finance pre-kindergarten classes will be rejected in Albany because it’s unnecessary and would actually increase education inequality in the state, Gov. Cuomo declared Wed­nesday. Read more: New York Post

Million dollar luxury watch theft bust

High-end jewelry and watch stores were the target of a four-man crime spree that authorities say hit luxury stores in New York, New Jersey and Virginia for more than a million dollars of watches. Read more: Fox New York

Comptroller to de Blasio: Don’t get involved in arrests

City Comptroller Scott Stringer on Wednesday criticized Mayor de Blasio for personally intervening when a politically connected preacher pal was busted by cops — saying “the mayor shouldn’t be involved in any way when someone gets arrested.” Read more: New York Post 

Study: Mammograms do not improve survival rates in middle-aged women

The value of mammograms is being questioned by a comprehensive new study. Read more: CBS New York

Comedian Sid Caesar dead at age 91

Sid Caesar, a giant of the Golden Age of Television, has died. Read more: AP/CBS New York