Tag Archives: Robert DeNiro

FBI finds possible human remains at Ozone Park home of late mobster ‘Jimmy the Gent’


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Federal investigators have found possible human remains at the Ozone Park home of late mobster James “Jimmy the Gent” Burke, according to an FBI spokesperson.

Officials began searching the home Monday in regards to an ongoing investigation.

According to reports, the search  is likely not related to the Lufthansa heist at JFK Airport which Burke was allegedly behind.

During the 1978 theft, the perpetrators made off with almost $6 million in cash and jewels.

Burke, who was famously portrayed by Robert DeNiro in the film “Goodfellas,” is believed to have murdered several individuals connected to the airport heist.

He died from cancer in prison 17 years ago, and the home, located at 81-48 102nd Road, is now reportedly owned by one of his daughters.

 

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FBI searches Ozone Park home of late mobster


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Federal investigators started searching the Ozone Park home of late mobster James “Jimmy the Gent” Burke Monday for “human remains and other evidence,” according to published reports.

Burke, who was famously portrayed by Robert DeNiro in the film “Goodfellas,” was allegedly behind the 1978 Lufthansa heist at JFK Airport, making off with almost $6 million in cash and jewels. It’s believed that Burke murdered several individuals connected to the crime.

According to reports, the investigation is likely not related to the Lufthansa heist.

The FBI confirmed to The Courier that there is currently a search under way regarding an ongoing investigation at 81-48 102nd Road, where Burke reportedly lived, but would not discuss the details.

Burke died from cancer in prison 17 years ago, and the home is now owned by one of his daughters, according to reports.

 

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New York boxing legends honored at Hall of Fame induction


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Photos Courtesy of Mike Savitsky

Long after these boxers threw their last punch, the judge’s scorecard awarded the legends one last belt.

The rich history of New York boxing was finally honored with the induction of the inaugural class of pugilists into the New York State Boxing Hall of Fame (NYSBHOF).

“Boxing in New York will not be forgotten,” said NYSBHOF founder Tony Mazzarella.

The induction ceremony took place Sunday, April 1 at Russo’s on the Bay in Howard Beach.

Each inductee received a Hall of Fame belt, reminiscent of the championship hardware they received throughout their careers.

Inducted into the first NYSBHOF class were “Sugar” Ray Robinson, Jake LaMotta, Mike Tyson, Carmen Basilio, Riddick Bowe, Carlos Ortiz, Vito Antuofermo, Emile Griffith, Mike McCallum, Gene Tunney, Benny Leonard and Tony Canzoneri.

LaMotta, McCallum, Griffith, Ortiz, Antuofermo, Acunto, Glenn and Lederman attended the gala, while the families of Robinson, Canzoneri, Tunney, Arcel, Gallo and Mercante were also represented.

The 90-year-old LaMotta, as famous for Robert DeNiro’s portrayal of him in “Raging Bull” as his legendary career, spoke in his acceptance speech about the greatest fighters he ever saw.

“I fought ‘Sugar’ Ray Robinson so many times it’s a wonder I don’t have diabetes,” LaMotta said of his fellow inductee, who passed away in 1989. “He broke my jaw, but you can see he never broke my nose. The greatest pound-for-pound fighter who ever lived is ‘Sugar’ Ray Robinson.”

LaMotta bestowed upon the actor who portrayed him similar praise.

“DeNiro is the greatest fighter who ever lived. How’d he play me? He sparred and shadow-boxed 1,000 rounds and when I was finished with him he could have turned pro,” LaMotta said.

The non-boxing inductees were judge/HBO analyst Harold Lederman, coach/instructor Steve Acunto, trainer/cutman Jimmy Glenn, trainers Gil Clancy and Ray Arcel, The Ring Magazine founder Nat Fleischer, New York Daily News boxing reporter/cartoonist Bill Gallo and referee Arthur Mercante, Sr.

The inductees were selected by a six-member NYSBHOF nominating committee.

To be eligible for hall of fame induction, boxers need to be inactive for at least three years and have had resided in New York for a significant portion of their boxing careers.

“The greatest fighters all fought in New York,” Lederman said.

Commemorative plaques listing the names of the inductees and NYSBHOF board members and nominating committee will be on display at the Waterfront Crabhouse in Long Island City.