Tag Archives: Ridgewood

Ridgewood may soon be home to a full-scale brewery


| slicata@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Angy Altamirano

The Queens Brewery could be hopping over to Ridgewood.

A new lease could be signed sometime this week by Nelson Rockefeller, the owner of the Long Island City-based Queens Brewery, for a warehouse building in Ridgewood, close to the Bushwick border, Community Board 5 District Manager Gary Giordano said during a board meeting Wednesday night.

If plans go through, this would be the first full-scale brewery, producing beer for distribution, to open in the neighborhood. Bridge and Tunnel Brewery, more of a brew pub, recently opened in Ridgewood.

Giordano said that Rockefeller wants to use the space for brewing and to offer beer tastings.

Rockefeller’s signature beer, Queens Lager, is currently produced at a brewery in Saratoga Springs even though his headquarters and most of his customers are in Queens. The Maspeth resident has always had a love for beer, which motivated him to first open up a micro-brewery in Long Island City. He has since expanded to brewing for commercial distribution.

Rockefeller could not be reached for comment, but in a previous interview with The Courier, he described his interest in the borough.

“Queens is forgotten. We’re bringing back Queens,” said Rockefeller. “You take care of your home base first.”

His first line of beer distributed was coined Queens Lager, which can now be found in over 40 bars around Queens.

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Port Authority director, BP Melinda Katz, industry leaders to headline first QNS Real Estate Conference


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Real Estate Conference logo edit

Pat Foye, the executive director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, will be the keynote speaker at the first QNS Real Estate Conference on Feb. 26.

As head of the bi-state agency that oversees the borough’s airports, LaGuardia and John F. Kennedy, Foye is positioned to speak about the major transformation coming to the airports, including the proposed LaGuardia AirTrain, which Governor Andrew Cuomo recently announced.

Foye, who was deputy secretary for economic development for Cuomo, headlines speakers from key firms in the real estate industry who will attend the networking event, which Star Network and The Queens Courier are hosting in association with the Real Estate Board of New York (REBNY). Real estate website PropertyShark, Flushing Bank, Mattone Group and Meridian Capital Group are sponsoring the symposium.

“This event is a great opportunity for the public to learn about the latest trends and investment information in Queens from the top people in our industry,” said Jamie McShane, REBNY senior vice president for communications. “Queens is becoming increasingly important as we have seen projects from Astoria Cove to Hallets Point, and projects at Queens Plaza South and the LIC waterfront, as well as Willets Point. And the members of the REBNY are very involved with a growing number of exciting projects in Queens, our largest borough and the most ethnically diverse county in America.”

Borough President Melinda Katz, who branded Queens the “World’s Borough,” will deliver the opening remarks at the event, which will take place at Terrace on the Park at Flushing Meadows Corona Park and begin at 8 a.m.

Following Katz’s opening comments and Foye’s keynote speech, members of the real estate industry from top firms will break into three panel discussions.

The panels will focus on different themes of the real estate industry in the borough, such as why big investments are being made in Queens, experiences in the borough from real estate companies, and expert perspectives on developments in Ridgewood and nearby Bushwick.

“The Queens market has huge opportunity and this event will shed light on the power of the Queens real estate market,” said Josh Schneps, co-publisher of The Queens Courier. “Our goal is to inform people and network. This event is a perfect platform to do so for the industry. We hope people interested in the Queens market will attend and hopefully make investments in the borough.”

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Ridgewood community talks preservation, discovery and redefinition


| slicata@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Salvatore Licata

Few neighborhoods in Queens are changing faster than Ridgewood, where new cafes and bars seem to spring up every week as a new generation floods into a community of longtime residents who’ve been around for decades.

Balancing that mix of old and new is the mission of a group of residents, both newcomers and old-timers, who met recently to talk about how to make the neighborhood work for all.

At Topos Bookstore Cafe, concerned residents joined six panelists, on Feb. 4, who all brought different knowledge of the neighborhood to a discussion about the future of it. The meeting focused on the important history that needs to be kept in the neighborhood, some of the new things on the rise there and ways for residents to control the future outlook of the neighborhood.

“Developers have a plan for Ridgewood,” said Stephanie Wakefield, one of the panelists at the meeting. “That plan is not necessarily good for us. We all know how it plays out, but we will only lose things in the neighborhood if we do nothing.”

Paul Kerzner, a longtime Ridgewood resident who was sitting on the panel, said that he and some other community activists anticipated this type of change over 20 years ago, which is why they took matters into their own hands at the time. He said that back then, he worked with government agencies to get most of the neighborhood rezoned in order to keep out any large developments and high-rise towers.

But he said with the increased demand for housing stock in the neighborhood, this rezoning is no longer enough to protect the community.

“We have to take the economic incentive away from the outside developers,” Kerzner said. “We have to get renters on a building-by-building basis to turn the buildings into a tenant co-op which would drive these big developers away.”

Another thing that the panelists discussed was that the neighborhood was becoming much less homogeneous. Ted Renz, another panelist at the meeting, said that this has done wonders for the Myrtle Avenue shopping district, which he believes can become a vibrant stronghold in the neighborhood’s local economy.

“With the new European cultures moving into the neighborhood, we got new night life on Myrtle,” said Renz. “Many of the old 99-cent stores are moving out and Myrtle Avenue is becoming a place to come shop and enjoy the entertainment.”

Henry Cross, the panelist who led the meeting, said he wanted to give residents ideas about how to move forward while keeping the community their own. He talked about the importance of social media and how the neighborhood has to use their digital presence to more of their advantage.

“As a community, it comes down to us working together to get what we want,” Cross said. “[Ridgewood] is a really great place to be in. It is incumbent upon us to adapt and change.”

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Man returns to Ridgewood drugstore to steal more over-the-counter meds: NYPD


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of NYPD

Police are looking for a man who they say stole over-the-counter medications from the same Myrtle Avenue drugstore more than once last year.

The suspect first took the drugs from the Duane Reade at 54-11 Myrtle Ave. in Ridgewood about 5:25 p.m. on Nov. 8.

He returned to the same drugstore about 4:40 p.m. on Dec. 29, again taking multiple over-the-counter medications before fleeing, cops said.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

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Man suspected in fourth Queens bank robbery


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Video courtesy of NYPD

A man who police say robbed three Queens banks late last year is suspected of returning to one of those banks to continue his crime spree.

The suspect entered the Astoria Bank at 75-25 Metropolitan Ave. in Middle Village on Wednesday about 11:35 a.m., passed a note and demanded money, police said. The teller handed over the cash and the man fled eastbound on Metropolitan Avenue with about $8,300.

Cops believe the same suspect robbed the same bank, at the same time, on Dec. 30, taking off with $7,400.

The suspect is also wanted in two other bank robberies, including one just down the street.

On Nov. 24, he is accused of robbing a Capital One Bank at 74-11 Metropolitan Ave., near 75th Street in Middle Village, just after 3 p.m. After entering the bank, the suspect passed a demand note and fled on foot with about $750.

He also robbed a Capital One Bank, at 70-01 Forest Ave., near 70th Avenue, in Ridgewood on Dec. 9 about 11:30 a.m., police said. The suspect fled the bank on foot with $2,617.

Police have released a video of the suspect from the Feb. 4 robbery and describe him as black, about 5 feet 6 inches tall and 190 pounds.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

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Real estate investors shelled out $3.6 billion for Queens properties last year


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Scott Bintner/PropertyShark

Queens’ relatively low land prices, access to public transportation and growing popularity has helped the borough attract a significantly larger amount of money from real estate investors in 2014 than in previous years, according to a new report.

Firms and individuals shelled out about $3.65 billion last year to buy Queens investment properties—large-scale real estate costing at least $850,000—which is a 25 percent increase from 2013, according to a report by Ariel Property Advisors.

The study pointed out that about one-third of the investment properties in Queens last year were development sites, which alone accounted for more than $1 billion, or a 191 percent gain when compared to 2012.

“Queens still presents developers with the opportunity to produce large-scale developments, and they are willing to pay a premium for prime sites,” said Daniel Wechsler, vice president of Ariel Property Advisors.

Photo courtesy of Ariel Property Advisors

Photo courtesy of Ariel Property Advisors

Wechsler pointed out that land parcels with at least 50,000 square feet of buildable rights were purchased all over “The World’s Borough,” including Astoria, Long Island City, Elmhurst, Woodside, Glendale, Jamaica, Ridgewood and Flushing, “further indicating the bullish attitude of investors on the entire borough. “

The report found that 925 properties were traded during the year, which is also a 25 percent year-over-year increase.

Some of the year’s highest profile transactions include the $110 million sale of the Standard Motors Building in Long Island City, which traded for just $70 million in 2008, and the sale of a 53-building portfolio in Kew Gardens Hills for $216 million.

There was also the $26.5 million sale of a garage near Queens Place mall in Elmhurst, which has about 227,352 buildable square feet.

Click here to read the full report.

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Star of Queens: Jus Daze, volunteer, Forward Rise


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

STAR

BY ASHA MAHADEVAN

BACKGROUND: Rapper Jus Daze, 31, was born in Brooklyn but raised in Queens. He has lived in the borough for the past 20 years and now lives in Ridgewood. He likes the diversity of the neighborhood and calls it “comfy.”

OCCUPATION: He is a hip-hop artist and a voiceover artist, doing voiceovers for documentaries. He works in Manhattan in a law firm.

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT: Jus Daze volunteers with Forward Rise, an organization he says that is dedicated to showing how children with disabilities are active in the community and inculcating positivity in youth. He is currently helping to facilitate an event the organization is holding in the summer in Long Island. He is fundraising and using his connections in the music and entertainment industries to raise the profile of the event, which includes a wheelchair basketball competition. He will also perform and sell CDs, the proceeds of which will be fully donated to charity. Growing up severely bowlegged, Jus Daze learned that if you stay grounded and embrace the community, the community will embrace you. Before Forward Rise, he also put together a mix tape that he gave away in exchange for contributions toward Hurricane Sandy relief. He matched the amounts he got with his own money and gave it all to Red Cross. He also spreads the anti-bullying message to schoolchildren.

GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT: “Winning rap battles in New York and in Canada, being on Jimmy Fallon in 2013, all that was great, but my greatest achievement is that when I started, I didn’t know what to do with the talent I’ve been given. I am moved when people tell me that they get through whatever they were going through by listening to my music. Helping people through my music because music helped me express all the pain I’ve been going through.”

BIGGEST CHALLENGE: “Sometimes, my biggest challenge is staying motivated in an industry [music] that is very underhanded and not letting the politics get in the way of my dreams.”

INSPIRATION: “The previous generations of hip-hop artists, pretty much everybody who listened to my music and gave me feedback, people who supported me, my family, my mom, my aunt, my wife, the children who tell me they did not bully back when they were being bullied. It’s inspiring.”

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Construction underway on Ridgewood’s largest new development


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Rendering courtesy of Essex Capital 

A rendering has been revealed for the largest new development in Ridgewood, a seven-story, 90-unit rental tower.

Construction has already begun on the project, which will be located at 16-14 and 16-26 Madison St. Essex Capital is building the residential structure and hopes to keep rents much lower than those in Manhattan and Brooklyn neighborhoods, according to a published report.

But rents in Ridgewood have been surging when compared to just five years ago, and exact rates weren’t given yet, Crain’s reported.

White Plains-based KSQ Architects is designing the building, which will also have 45 parking spaces, according to records filed with the Buildings Department in 2013.

Essex Capital paid $4.7 million for the two lots in 2013, according to city records.

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Revitalized Ridgewood commerical building with Lucille Roberts asking for $8.5M


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Berko & Associates

A Ridgewood commercial property on  busy Myrtle Avenue is up for sale and the asking price is $8.5 million.

The building, located at 55-05 Myrtle Ave., is fully leased with a Lucille Roberts gym on the second and third floors, and two medical offices on the ground floor.

The building has 18,000 square feet, and the gym is occupying 11,000 square feet, according to real estate firm Berko & Associates, which is handling marketing for the property.

Years ago, the ground floor was occupied by a furniture store. The building was revitalized and updated with the new tenants last year.

It is about two blocks from the Myrtle – Wyckoff Avenues L and M train station.

Contact Berko & Associates’ Alan Simonowitz at 212-683-2208 for more information about the property.

Photo courtesy of Nicholas Strini/PropertyShark

Photo courtesy of Nicholas Strini/PropertyShark

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Tech-based laundry, dry cleaning company to expand services into Queens


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Images courtesy of WashClub NYC

Having your laundry washed is about to get as easy as tapping on a smartphone for residents in Long Island City, Ridgewood and Maspeth.

WashClub NYC, a tech-based laundry and dry cleaning company offering on-demand pickup and delivery, has announced it plans to make its way to Queens within the first few months of 2015.

The Brooklyn-based company, which launched in 2010 and has since been operating in Manhattan and Brooklyn, also debuted a new app for Apple and Android users. Customers will be able to schedule, track and personalize the care of their laundry and dry cleaning through an “easy three-tap method.”

“We’re creating a path that is disrupting the way the laundry and dry cleaning industry operates,” said Rick Rome, president of WashClub NYC. “By releasing our app and entering select neighborhoods of Queens, we are going to reach more New York customers than ever before.”

The way WashClub NYC works is customers, either on the web or via the app, create an account and schedule a free pickup. They will then have to get the laundry ready to be picked up on the scheduled date and time.

Within 24 to 48 hours, customers will receive an email or text message notification about 30 minutes or less before the driver arrives. Delivery is free and people can choose what time works best for them. On the app, customers can also track via Google maps where the driver is and how close they are.

Services offered by WashClub NYC, which does all the cleaning in-house, include wash and fold, dry cleaning and tailoring. All first-time users receive 20 percent off and a free laundry bag.

“Our overall company goal is to be able to service all of New York City eventually,” Rome said. “It’s the most convenient and easiest way to do your laundry.”

Rome added that the reason services will start being offered in Long Island City, Ridgewood and Maspeth is because of their proximity to the Brooklyn facility.

However, he said in the future he plans to open a facility in Queens to be able to serve the entire borough.

“Queens is a very important and exciting next step for us. We think Queens is going to be an absolute fantastic market place,” Rome said. “Queens is a stepping stone to the next area.”

For more information or to set up an account, visit www.WashClubNYC.com or call 888-920-1370.

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Ridgewood community members will hold panel to talk about its future


| slicata@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of the Landmark Preservation Commission

Ridgewood is changing, but the historic stability of the neighborhood makes it different from most communities in the city that are gentrifying, said Henry Cross, a Ridgewood resident and community activist.

It has been a long-debated topic with many articles and publications talking about the new look of the small neighborhood in southwest Queens, but residents don’t want to be grouped in with New York neighborhoods known for rising rents and new restaurants, bars and shops popping up around the area.

Cross, along with other community stakeholders, will hold a panel discussion on Feb. 4 to talk about some recent issues.

“I feel that this discussion will be a step in the right direction to specifically address community topics,” Cross said. “I absolutely see change and this discussion is going to focus on where the neighborhood was, where it is and where it is going.”

Cross has lived in the neighborhood for six years and said the reason Ridgewood is different from the neighborhoods across the border in Brooklyn, which it is usually compared to, is because of its history. He said there is a very stable environment in Ridgewood even with the recent change because the people who have recently moved in respect the preservation of its history.

He backed this up by talking about how another section of the neighborhood, Central Ridgewood, was recently designated as a  historic district by the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission, joining Ridgewood North, Ridgewood South and the  Stockholm Street historic districts.

“There is valued work that has been done by people in the neighborhood,” Cross said. When asked whether he thinks the recent change in the neighborhood will weaken its fabric, he replied, “Those without the means of change are without the means of preservation.”

The panel discussion will take place at Topos Bookstore Café, located on 788 Woodward Ave., from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Cross has chosen three people to address the preservation of the neighborhood, two people to discuss what can be discovered about the neighborhood and one person to talk about redefining the neighborhood.

“I want to discuss what needs to be preserved in the neighborhood, what people can discover and what people could say about how the neighborhood has been,” Cross said. “We have to figure out how we could continue to shape it for the next generations.”

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Ridgewood rents skyrocketing since end of recession


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Charts and photos courtesy of StreetEasy.com

“Quooklyn,” “Ridgewick,” “Ridgebetween,” whatever you want to call it, rents in Ridgewood have exploded in the city’s newest hot neighborhood since the end of the recession.

Rents in Ridgewood last year increased about 63 percent since 2009, according to data compiled by real estate website StreetEasy.com at the request of The Courier, as more luxury rental buildings moved down the L and M train lines from Bushwick and Williamsburg.

The data finds the median price of rents in Ridgewood last year increased to $2,182 from $1,340 in 2009, good for first place in rents charged in Queens. Even when comparing year-to-date numbers between last year and 2013, Ridgewood experienced median rent increases of more than $382, while Astoria saw only a $50 increase and Long Island City actually had a decline.

“While rents remained flat in Queens between 2013 and 2014, some neighborhoods experienced a surge in prices,” said Alan Lightfeldt, a StreetEasy data scientist. “Ridgewood — also known as ‘Ridgebetween’ because of its new found status as an ‘in-between’ neighborhood of Brooklyn and Queens — saw prices increase by just over 21 percent as demand for the neighborhood has surged in recent years.”

This “new-found status” has helped businesses and created a buzz about Ridgewood that excites some longtime locals, and makes former residents want to come back, but renters are paying for it.

 

09-14 Rents

Another interesting find from the data suggests rising prices will continue in the Rockaways, which had previously recorded a drop due to effects from Superstorm Sandy.

“As this neighborhood continues its recovery from the destruction of Superstorm Sandy, rents have increased rapidly but still remain lower than they were five years ago — a sign that the rental market in Rockaways still has room for further recovery in the months and years ahead,“ Lightfeldt said.

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Port Authority releases Tier 1 study of cross harbor freight program


| slicata@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Salvatore Licata

The Port Authority is looking for a better way to move freight through the New York metropolitan area including new proposals to boost rail traffic along a sleepy freight line through western Queens that could leave some homeowners shaking in their beds.

A new study, released at a Queens Borough Hall meeting on Jan. 12, outlined 10 different proposals for shipping rail freight across the harbor, from New Jersey to a rail line that stretches from the Brooklyn waterfront up to the Hellgate Bridge in Astoria. The line now carries an average of one freight train a day. If any of the proposals come to fruition, there would be many more — and larger — trains rolling down that track.

Among the hardest hit would be neighborhoods in the Glendale and Ridgewood area where the Fresh Pond train yard is located.

Proposals for a cross-harbor freight tunnel have been explored for almost a century. But the Port Authority, facing exploding growth of freight that is now moved through the city almost entirely by truck, needs another option to keep its bridges and tunnels from overflowing with truck traffic.

“We have to figure out a better way to move freight,” said Mark Hoffer, director of New Port Initiatives for the Port Authority. “We must analyze, study [the area] and come up with alternatives.”

Hoffer said that 90 percent of freight, nationally produced, comes in to the area by truck. By 2035, the Port Authority projected that over 300 million more tons of freight will have to come into the area. To meet that demand, the PA has come up with a range of options, from building a new tunnel to creating a water-borne shipping system that would carry rail cars across the harbor. Either proposal would boost freight rail through Brooklyn and Queens.

Currently, the closest rail crossing over the Hudson is in Selkirk, N.Y., about 150 miles north of the city. That means that the vast majority of freight shipped by rail from the west is unloaded in New Jersey and trucked across the river to New York City, Long Island, the northern suburbs and parts of New England.

“Using a rail option for this project would severely impact my district,” said Councilwomen Elizabeth Crowley, who covers the Glendale and Ridgewood area. She also said the noise pollution added by the influx of diesel-powered freight trains would hurt the quality of life of people in the area.

Hoffer did not deny the claim saying that it would affect some communities that are near the railway. But he was quick to say that the use of freight trains would be something that would benefit the area as a whole.

The Port Authority estimated that upgrading the rail system in the area, which could include building tunnels under water for freight to ship through, would cost anywhere from $7 to $11 billion and take about eight years to build. The waterborne options have been estimated to cost anywhere from $100 to $600 million and take two to four years to finish.

The next step for the Port Authority is to meet with local elected officials, community groups and other interested parties. They are also holding a public meeting to hear any concerns of residents in Queens on Jan. 29 from 4 to 8 p.m. at Queens Borough Hall.

Following that their initial study, the Port Authority will be publishing a Record of Decision, which will list a group of alternatives they will take into their next, more detailed, study.

“The population is growing and we are going to be consuming more. We have to do something, the question is finding the right something,” Hoffer said. “We don’t have a realistic option in doing nothing.”

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Ridgewood magician competes on ‘Worst Cooks in America’


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Food Network

A Ridgewood magician is trying to make his disastrous cooking skills disappear — and he’s turned to the Food Network for help.

Michael “Six” Muldoon, 26, is a contestant on “Worst Cooks in America,” which kicked off its sixth season on Jan. 4. The show takes 14 abysmal home cooks and divides them into two teams — one led by returning Chef Anne Burrell and the second by first-time opponent Chef Tyler Florence.

The contestants go through a culinary boot camp, during which two of them are eliminated each week. Two finalists, one from each team, will face off in the finale, where they will prepare a three-course menu. The winner will receive $25,000 and bragging rights for their chef.

Just how bad are these cooks? Some admit to starting kitchen fires and even poisoning friends and family.

When the contestants are told to create their signature dish in the first episode so the chefs can choose their teams, one contestant substitutes gummy bears for goose fat, then tries to cut the candy with the wrong end of a knife. Another woman cooks a baked potato by microwaving it in a plastic bag.

But Muldoon is just as clueless.

“I try to make meals that look like one thing and taste like something else, and it just never seems to work,” the magician says as he tries to explain his spaghetti and meatball cake, which looks like a cake but tastes like spaghetti and meatballs.

Florence is not impressed.

“Surprise, it’s burnt,” he says. And Burrell ends up picking Muldoon for her team.

Muldoon’s magic skills are better left for the stage, not the kitchen.

At a young age, Muldoon coped with having a sixth finger and weight issues. His Maspeth house burned down when he was 11 and his parents separated around that time. Muldoon found magic at about age 13, which helped give him the confidence he needed. He later turned the hobby into a career.

In addition to performing, he started System 6 Magic, a company that produces playing cards and DVDs. He is also vice president of Magicians Without Borders, which travels to more than 30 countries “using magic to entertain, educate and empower.”

Muldoon, who was 25 when he appeared on “Worst Cooks,” was nominated to be a contestant by his brother for his magic-inspired food that constantly missed the mark. The two have a bet that if Muldoon learns to cook, then his brother will learn some magic tricks.

“I wasn’t cooking bad. I was cooking over the top more than anything else, ” Muldoon said.

He only heard of the show in passing before being nominated, and after watching past episodes he wasn’t sure he could take the humiliation. But he ultimately decided the challenge was worth it.

“This is one of the hardest things I’ve had to do. You are learning and you’re memorizing and there are a lot steps,” he said.

Muldoon also wanted to appear on the competition so he could learn to cook for his girlfriend. With his new skills, he says it’s nice to give her a break from making meals.

Though Muldoon says the biggest lesson he’s learned from the show is simplicity, it doesn’t mean he has given up on his magic dishes.

“It’s in the back of my head,” he said. “Knowing what I know, I wonder if I can pull off a good one now.”

To see Muldoon compete in the next episode of “Worst Cooks in America,” watch Sunday, Jan. 18, at 9 p.m. on the Food Network.

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Identify this place in Queens


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

WHERE

Do you know where in Queens this photo was taken? Guess by commenting below! The answer will be revealed next week.

Last week’s answer to “Identify this Place”: Evergreen Park in Ridgewood
Evergreen Park

 

 

 

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