Tag Archives: Ridgewood

Passenger stabs livery cab driver, steals car in Ridgewood: police  


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

POLICE TAPE

Updated 8:35 p.m.

Police are searching for a man who allegedly stabbed a 30-year-old livery cab driver several times before driving off with his car in Ridgewood early Thursday morning.

The driver was dispatched to Hemlock Street and Jamaica Avenue in Brooklyn, where he picked up the suspect at about 1:10 a.m., and was asked to drive the man to Ridgewood, police said.

Around 1:35 a.m. a witness saw the livery cab hit a parked car then speed off at 69th Avenue and Fresh Pond Road, cops said. A short time later and just a few blocks away, the driver was found near 70th Avenue and 60th Street with stab wounds to the chest, arm and hands. His passenger had allegedly taken off with his 2012 gray Toyota Camry after the two got into an argument and the suspect stabbed him.

The cabbie was transported to Elmhurst Hospital, where he is listed in critical but stable condition.

livery cab

Photo courtesy of NYPD

Police have released a photo of a man wanted for questioning in connection to the stabbing and stolen car, 41-year-old Kenneth Suden, and describe him as 5 feet 7 inches tall and 180 pounds. The vehicle has a New York registration number of T634876C.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging ontothe Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

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Middle Village, local 10-year-old featured in soon-to-be-released movie


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photos by Kelsey Bennett

Middle Village is ready for its close-up.

The neighborhood is the backdrop for a soon-to-be-released film focusing on an ex-mafia captain (“capo”) as he comes to grips with how his former life has changed after spending the last 20 years in federal prison. The movie also features a 10-year-old actress from the neighborhood, Olivia Panepinto, in her debut role.

Director, writer and producer David Rodriguez was inspired to make “Once Upon a Time in Queens” after seeing a program on the Investigation Discovery channel about an FBI agent who went undercover in the Gambino crime family in the Bronx. There was one member who was recently released from prison and came home to reclaim his old rackets, but most of the people from his former mob life were dead, in prison or informants.

“In his mind it was still the early 90s … where you could still survive in this world and be untouchable, and what he didn’t realize was that it was the opposite,” Rodriguez said.

In the film, Paul Sorvino plays Joseph Scoleri, who was sent away for racketeering and conspiracy to commit murder. After his release, he goes to live at his Middle Village home, with his 43-year-old daughter Rita (Renee Props). In addition to leaving his gangster lifestyle behind and being forbidden to speak to former associates, Scoleri must reestablish his relationship with his daughter and come to terms with how she has been living her life.

He also becomes reacquainted with his neighbor Bobby DiBianco, played by Michael Rapaport, whom he last saw as a teenager.

Bobby now has a family of his own and runs his father’s deli, and agrees to help run errands for the ailing Scoleri. The character represents a progressive, professional lifestyle, instead of a wannabe gangster, according to Rodriguez.

“He speaks to [Scoleri] like nobody has ever spoken to him,” Rodriguez said. “That is another shocker to him.”

Part of Bobby’s family man image is his daughter Liv, played by Olivia.

Olivia

The current fifth-grader landed the part after three impressive auditions. She was so good that her part was changed from a boy to a girl.

“She really knocked it out of the park in the audition,” Rodriguez said. The part was also changed to make the film less male-centric and more heartfelt.

Olivia’s dream of acting started at two years old when she was watching TV and asked, “How can I be in the box?”

After a trip to Los Angeles where she visited the Hollywood Walk of Fame and asked her parents how she could “get one of those stars,” Olivia started taking acting lessons, and landed her first part in “Once Upon a Time in Queens.”

“It was like my dream come true,” she said. “It was even more cool that we shot it in my neighborhood.”

Filming was somewhat challenging, but mostly fun, Olivia said, especially when Sorvino would sing opera between takes.

The young actress has also appeared in a web show called “Mona in Manhattan” with her older sisters, Alessandra, 14, and Emmanuela, 12, and will be filming a movie with them in LA this January called “Marilyn Monroe Zombie Hunter.”

Olivia  during a scene at a Middle Village deli with actor Michael Rapaport (far right).

Olivia during a scene at a Middle Village deli with actor Michael Rapaport (far right).

Olivia’s father Ignazio was also involved in “Once Upon a Time in Queens,” receiving a co-executive producer credit for helping find most the locations for the film, which was mainly shot in Middle Village and Ridgewood. Some scenes were filmed at Juniper Valley Park and Village Gourmet on Eliot Avenue, a stand-in for Bobby’s deli.

Though the film was shown at several film festivals around the country last year, including the 2013 Austin Film Festival, its official premiere, with its new name, will take place this Wednesday in the East Village.

In February, Lionsgate purchased the movie, which was originally called “Last I Heard,” and renamed it “Once Upon a Time in Queens.”

It also will have a Los Angeles premiere on Thursday, which will be followed by a seven-day theatrical run in the city. On Nov. 11 it will be available on DVD, iTunes, Netflix and Amazon Instant Video.

Rodriguez hopes audiences “see the film for what it is.”

“I don’t want people to see the movie and think it’s a mob movie,” he said. “It’s a slice of New York life.”

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First Queens Art Intervention Day to offer interactive projects throughout borough


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photos by RPGA Studios

Communities throughout Queens are set for an artistic intervention, looking to inspire, educate and empower residents and feed the pulse of the borough.

The nonprofit studio Rego Park Green Alliance, which uses creative methods to address community issues, will host the first Queens Art Intervention Day on Sept. 27 throughout the borough from Long Island City to the Rockaways.

“We see something that we are not happy with and we try to think about how we can fix it in a creative way,” said Yvonne Shortt, who started the studio and is currently the executive director.

The day-long event, which has a rain date for Oct. 4, will feature a total of 30 projects including murals, art installations, performance pieces, hands-on programs, and many more creative activities taking place outdoors in Astoria, LIC, Kew Gardens, Elmhurst, Rego Park, Forest Hills, Jackson Heights, Ozone Park, Ridgewood, Laurelton, Corona, Whitestone and the Rockaways.

QAIposter6

“We want our borough to be seen as a place that people want to come and do interesting things,” Shortt said. “We hope this will help Queens continue to grow and continue to thrive and not just have one spot thought of as artistic and creative.”

According to Shortt, along with being visually appealing, the pieces will also serve to bring about change and to get community members thinking about certain issues.

For example, posters for one project called “Stat Girl” depict a super hero displaying statistics on traffic accidents that have occurred on Queens Boulevard in the past two years. The posters will be put up all day down the thoroughfare.

stat girl photo by RPGA Studios

“We would love for people to stop and engage,” Shortt said. “It’s really about the communities themselves to find some inspiration and advocate for better communities.”

Shortt said that although there were over 160 submissions this year, funding, provided solely by Shortt, only allowed for 25 projects to be part of the event. In the future, she hopes to expand the event to more days and many more communities in the borough.

“There’s an active pulse throughout the borough of Queens and I’m very excited to help it move forward. I feel that if you have ideas and are willing to push it forward, that Queens is a very inviting borough.” Shortt said. “We’re showing the vitality of Queens.”

For more information and the full list of projects for Queens Art Intervention Day, click here.

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Report: Queens rental prices drop in August


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Charts courtesy of MNS Real Estate 

The fluctuating Queens rental market saw a decrease in prices in August, after increases in July, according to the “Queens Rental Market Report” by MNS Real Estate.

Average rents throughout the borough dropped 3.74 percent from $2,113 in July to $2,034 in August, the report stated.

The report focused on several neighborhoods, including Long Island City, Astoria, Ridgewood, Flushing, Rego Park, Forest Hills and Jackson Heights.

The biggest changes occurred in studio apartments in Ridgewood, where prices dropped 43.5 percent — about $848 — to $1,100, the least expensive rental price for any type of apartment in the borough. The average price of a studio in the borough is $1,550, according to the report.

Studios page

Also, two-bedroom units in Jackson Heights dipped 26.12 percent to $1,841 from $2,494 in July, a decrease of $653.

“Smaller neighborhoods in Queens are seeing slower progression, however more new developments are scheduled to open their doors in the coming months offering high-end amenities and exceptional convenience,” the report said. “As is evident from the overall decrease in prices this month Queens is expected to have up and down monthly fluctuations, but long-term projections have prices increasing steadily.”

Flushing had the largest decrease in overall average rents with 7.47 percent. Two-bedroom units in Flushing experienced a fall of 17.8 percent from $2,599 in July to $2,136 in August.

The biggest increase was in Ridgewood, where prices for one-bedroom apartments rose 15.3 percent or $260 to $1,960.

Prices in Astoria and Long Island City remained fairly stable, although dropped slightly, according to the report.

Click here to view the full report.

 

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Report: Queens rental prices increase


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Charts courtesy of MNS Real Estate

Rental prices are continuing to rise in the borough, according to the Queens Rental Market Report by MNS Real Estate.

Rents in Queens jumped about 1.76 percent from approximately $2,077 in June to $2,113 in July, according to the report, which targeted several Queens neighborhoods, including Long Island City, Astoria, Ridgewood, Flushing, Forest Hills, Jackson Heights and Rego Park.

The largest percentage increase in rent prices was seen in studios in Jackson Heights, which saw a 21 percent jump over a month. Studios in the neighborhood shot up from $1,238 in June to about $1,500 in July.

Two-bedrooms in Flushing also experienced a huge surge as prices soared more than 15 percent—an increase of $345 from $2,254 in June to $2,599 in July.

web Market report Jax Hts

The most expensive neighborhood was Long Island City. Although prices fell 0.65 percent for the month because of “a maturing luxury rental market,” according to the report, the average rent prices ranged from $2,410 for a studio to $3,908 for a two-bedroom apartment.

“The rental market throughout Queens is still following the patterns of recent months as the borough continues to see major growth, particularly in Long Island City and Astoria,” the report points out. “With new developments and conversions hitting the market recently, renters have flocked to these areas seeking more options and value for their money.”

Market report page 2 beds web

Studios in Forest Hills had the largest percentage decrease. Prices for a studio in the neighborhood dropped 27 percent ($501) from $1,851 in June to $1,350 in July.

To see the full report, click here.

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Painting helps connect Ridgewood resident to his home


| slicata@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Salvatore Licata

The simple act of painting his surroundings helped draw a Texas transplant closer to his new hometown of Ridgewood.

David Nakabayashi, 52, has been painting since his early childhood. He moved to Ridgewood from Texas in December and right away began painting the landscape of his new area.

“This takes me out of the studio and connects me to my neighborhood,” he said. “It’s a great area to paint.”

Nakabayashi can be spotted throughout the neighborhood about two to three times a week as he does his paintings of Ridgewood en plein air.

He picks a spot to set up his paint stand and illustrates the scene taking place in front of him on a tiny 7-by-7-inch canvas.

During his usual four to five hours of painting, in which he finishes about two to three canvases, locals stop to admire the work and talk about the history of some of the buildings or scenery he may be painting.

Paint_3

“There are times where I’ll be painting a building and people come up to me and start talking about different stores that used to be there or the different people that once lived there,” he said. “If I hadn’t been out on the streets I would have never learned so much [about Ridgewood].”

Nakabayashi is a self-taught painter. He relies on his artwork as his main source of income but does it for more than just monetary purposes.

“I feel it is my civic duty if I’m a talented guy to give back to my neighborhood,” he said. “Although my paintings are about the neighborhood what’s really important is the connection between me and the art.”

He described Ridgewood as a tight-knit community and said he has never had a bad comment come from any resident who passes by to watch him paint.

“Ridgewood has been super nice to me,” Nakabayashi said. “It’s an ideal place to paint because there is so much diversity in the area.”

paint

He said he has held many “normal” jobs throughout his life, mostly in Texas and New Mexico, but none have given him more pride than painting. The art scene in New York drew him to the city as he is now just a train ride away from some of the most famous art museums in the world. He believes that Ridgewood has been the place for him to live all along.

“I never had the experience of being able to go anywhere and see art all over,” he said. “I think this might be home. I like it here.”

To check out more of Nakabayashi’s work go to www.davidnakabayashi.com.

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Ridgewood bar hosts first variety and burlesque show


| slicata@queenscourier.com

Photos Courtesy of KissedPR

Queens County took on a whole new meaning when a Ridgewood bar hosted a burlesque show.

The first-ever Ridgewood Variety Show, held on Aug. 14, bedazzled patrons at the Queens Tavern on Fresh Pond Road.

“There were so many talented acts,” said Sarah Feldman, one of the organizers of the event and operator of the website Ridgewood Social. “The bar owner and the locals had a fabulous time.”

The two–hour show, held in front of more than 30 cheering guests, included drag, dance, singing, comedy and burlesque acts.

Headliners included New Orleans chanteuse Bronze Bettina, “Maven of the Underworld” Lady Zombie, premiere female drag queen Miss Crimson Kitty and Jantina, the “Burlesque Booty Queen.”

“This was a variety show and the difference between a variety show and a burlesque is you have an opportunity to entertain people with more unique performers,” Feldman said.

The event was put together by both Ridgewood Social and KissedPR, a public relations firm for small businesses. One person even commented on how the performances reminded them of what used to happen in Greenwich Village and said it was a “very New York City” kind of night.

The show worked out so well that Feldman was asked to put together another one and is hoping that she can have it as a monthly event at the tavern.

Already, she and the owner of the Queens Tavern have scheduled for the next show to be on Sept. 18 and hope for an even bigger crowd.

 

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Police looking for driver in fatal Maspeth hit-and-run


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

PoliceCarHC0312_L_300_C_R

A 32-year-old Ridgewood man was struck and killed in a hit-and-run accident early Monday morning, police said.

Police responded to a call at about 2:52 a.m. on Fresh Pond Road between 60th Drive and Elliot Avenue where they found Karoll Grzegorczyk unconscious with trauma on his body, lying on the road. Grzegorczyk was taken to Elmhurst Hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival, according to the NYPD.

Further investigation showed that Grzegorczyk was walking on Fresh Pond Road when mid-block he entered the street between parked cars, police said. The Ridgewood resident was then struck by a dark-colored sedan, which fled the scene.

No arrests have been made and the investigation is ongoing.

 

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L’Arte del Gelato opening factory, first Queens spot in LIC


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy of Jamestown

Long Island City is getting a taste of “la dolce vita.”

L’Arte del Gelato, which has three locations in Manhattan, has stationed a cart outside The Food Box located in the Falchi Building at 31-00 47th Ave.

The cart will be serving 12 flavors of gelato on weekdays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and will be offering a buy one, get one free gelato deal every Friday. Nine of the popular flavors will stay the same and three flavors change every Monday.

“I think this is an upcoming area,” said Francesco Realmuto, owner of L’Arte del Gelato, about deciding to open up a spot in Long Island City, the first in Queens. “I think the building is great. There are a lot of people in the area, there is a lot of new construction. I think the next couple of years we’ll see a stronger community.”

L’Arte del Gelato products are made from recipes brought from Sicily, where Realmuto is from, and feature all-natural ingredients found in either local markets or imported from Italy.

“We’re a really authentic product,” said Realmuto, a Ridgewood resident. “We’re a great product.”

The gelato cart will be in front of the Falchi Building as long as weather is permitting, according to Realmuto, and will come back in the spring.

In the next couple of weeks, Realmuto also said he plans on opening a gelato factory inside the Falchi Building. The factory will make gelato to sell to supermarkets such as Dean & DeLuca.

The Food Box is a 2,000-square-foot pop-up artisanal food fair located on the ground floor of the five-story, 657,660-square-foot, multi-tenant and mixed-use building.

Vendors within The Food Box include Karu Café, ReCaFo, Made from Scratch and Mrs. Soupy & Friends.

Last year, Jamestown announced the multi-million dollar repositioning and capital improvement program at the Falchi Building, built in 1920 as a warehouse and distribution facility. This program includes façade and lobby renovations, furniture upgrades, art installations and the introduction of food purveyors, such as L’Arte del Gelato and Artisanal Cheese.

Other Falchi Building tenants include jewelry manufacturers, government and medical offices, and media, technology and engineering companies.

 

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Ridgewood thrift shop shutting its doors


| slicata@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photo by Salvatore Licata


A Second Glance, a thrift store in Ridgewood, will be closing up shop later this month but hopes to make a comeback within the neighborhood soon.

Co-owners Aaron and Jola Amrhern, both 28 and residents of Ridgewood, said their storefront will be closing Aug. 17 because their sub-lease is up. They have generated a large following in their two years of leasing, at 61-65 Metropolitan Ave., and hope to find another spot nearby to keep serving them.

“I grew up two blocks from [the store]. This neighborhood is my home,” Aaron said. “We’re looking for another spot around here and hopefully we can continue to do what we love in this community.”

Once closed, a furniture store will take up the location, which will be operated by the property owner, according to the Amrherns. But they hope to continue to sell their unique items in the neighborhood again sometime in the winter. They said they have already looked at two nearby locations, one on Fresh Pond Road and one on Myrtle Avenue, but will keep shopping around until they find the right fit.

A Second Glance is no ordinary thrift shop, according to the Amrherns, who consider it more of an antique store because of the rich history many of the items have. Among many other items, they have a pair of J.J. Slater shoes from the 1800s; similar shoes can also be found on display on the Smithsonian Institution. The Amrherns once had a $15,000 bottle of A.E. Dor cognac from 1889, of which only two were made, come through the door.

“I won’t put just anything on my shelves,” Aaron, who finds most of his items while traveling, said. “I am very selective with my stuff.”

For now, they are having sales up to 50 percent off on some items. Everything that isn’t sold by the Aug. 17 will go to their warehouse.

Once the store closes, they are going on a two-week search for new antiques and items, which according to the couple, is their vacation. They said they hope the new items they find will be on display in their new store soon.

 

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Historic Ridgewood Onderdonk House finally getting roof replacement


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre


It’s finally time to raise the roof off this old house.

Work to replace the roof of the landmarked Vander Ende-Onderdonk House, the city’s oldest Dutch Colonial residence, has finally commenced after being delayed a year.

The Ridgewood site, which has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a city landmark, serves as a museum in the neighborhood and hosts public and private events during the year, including weddings. It is also the home of the Greater Ridgewood Historical Society.

However, wear and tear on the more than 30-year-old roof, caused leaks during rain and after melting of large snow accumulations.

“If you were to go up to the second floor and look up you would see a lot of daylight,” said Steve Monte, a board member of the Greater Ridgewood Historical Society. “And it would only get worse.”

The Onderdonk House, named for former owners Paulus Vander Ende and Adrian Onderdonk, served as the boundary line between the towns of Newtown and Bushwick in 1769, settling a Brooklyn-Queens dispute.

In 2009, the society hosted a fundraiser to collect money for the roof replacement. And in the 2012, capital budget former Councilwoman Diana Reyna allocated $500,000 to the Greater Ridgewood Historical Society for the project. The budget for the project is $670,000, according to Community Board 5.

While the roof is being replaced, the museum is still open to the public on Saturdays and it will continue to host events. The roof replacement is scheduled to be completed by late September.

 

 

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Ridgewood coffee shop gives a helping hand to local artists


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Salvatore Licata

SALVATORE LICATA

It is not easy for local artists to get their names heard but Norma’s, a coffee shop in Ridgewood, is doing everything they can to help.

Denise Plowman and Crystal Williams started their “support local art” initiative in their coffee shop after they opened on Catalpa Avenue two years ago.

They allow the artists to promote their work, free of charge, and then give the proceeds from the sales to the artists—without taking a cut.

“It was our dream to open up Norma’s,” Plowman said. “This gives us an opportunity to help other locals’ dreams come true.”

The shop’s walls and furniture is filled with all types of creative works, ranging from jewelry, books, greeting cards and paintings to handcrafted pins and miniature aprons.

Currently, the store holds the work of about 12 different locals. Sarah Feldman, the first designer showcased in Norma’s, said the store helped to rejuvenate her jewelry business.

“I stopped making jewelry for a while but decided to set up some of my work in Norma’s when [Plowman and Williams] asked me to,” said Feldman, who now operates the jewelry website princepeacock.com. “It got me so motivated once I heard my stuff was selling. It’s a great feeling to have people come up to you in the neighborhood and say, ‘Wow, you’re the jewelry girl!’”

Plowman said more and more artists have asked to display their work just from hearing about her store’s campaign through word of mouth. She said the art has been flying off the walls and that she always gets comments about how great the pieces are.

“There’s a lot of creative people in this neighborhood but not a lot of exposure for them,” Plowman said. “I think it’s important to do this to help them grow.”

 

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The Doe Fund to help clean up Myrtle, Grand avenues


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Councilwoman Elizabeth Crowley's Office

CHRIS BUMBACA

In an effort to beautify Queens and support job growth within District 30, Councilwoman Elizabeth Crowley and The Doe Fund announced on Thursday discretionary budget funding of The Doe Fund’s Ready, Willing & Able program.

The Fund’s president and founder, George McDonald as well as other local community leaders, were also on hand for the announcement. The Doe Fund’s workers, men who were formerly incarcerated or homelessness, will take part in this year-long transitional program, and service streets and sidewalks along Myrtle and Grand avenues in communities such as Glendale, Ridgewood and Maspeth, improving cleanliness and safety throughout the community.

Crowley acquired $61,800 in funding in the current budget to fund these street-cleaning crews.

“I’m so thrilled to welcome The Doe Fund to District 30. Myrtle and Grand Avenues have been major sources of sanitation complaints for years, but thanks to The Doe Fund, residents and business owners along these commercial corridors will begin to see a big difference almost immediately,” Crowley, who also serves as Chair of the Committee on Fire and Criminal Justice, said. “This program is win-win: keeping our community clean, while simultaneously providing jobs, education, and career development services for hardworking New Yorkers trying to turn their lives around and make a positive impact.”

The crews will pick up litter and clean trash on Myrtle Avenue from Cooper Avenue to Fresh Pond Road and on Grand Avenue from 61st to 74th streets, three days a week for the next year. Clean-up on Myrtle Avenue began on July 15, and crews began cleaning Grand Avenue on July 15.

“We’re grateful and proud to join Councilmember Crowley in her commitment to her district and the vibrant communities in it,” McDonald said. “By choosing The Doe Fund’s ‘men in blue’ to service Myrtle Avenue and the surrounding area, Ms. Crowley is leading by example, providing our men the opportunity and work they need to transform their lives, while improving the cleanliness and safety of the district’s streets.”

“This is only the beginning, and I look forward to expanding this program over the next several years,” Crowley added.

 

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Two men arrested in Ridgewood attempted rape of 18-year-old


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

Two men have been charged with attempted rape after attacking a teen in Ridgewood earlier this week, according to police.

The 18-year-old victim was walking near Putnam and Seneca avenues at about 2:50 a.m. on Wednesday when the two suspects came up behind her, and one of the men choked the girl and covered her mouth with his hand, cops said.

The second suspect tried to steal her purse, but she was able to hold on to it. The first suspect then attempted to sexually assault her, but both men fled when someone passed by them, authorities said.

The victim was taken to Woodhull Hospital where she was treated and released.

Franclin Velazquez, 21, of Brooklyn, and Jorge Maldonado, 28, of the Bronx, have both been charged with attempted rape and sexual abuse, police said. Maldonado has also been charged with assault.

 

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Pair sought in Ridgewood attempted rape of teen


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photos and video courtesy of NYPD


An 18-year-old was attacked by two men who punched and choked the girl before trying to rob and rape her in Ridgewood on Wednesday, police said.

The victim was walking near Putnam and Seneca avenues at about 2:50 a.m. when the two suspects came up behind her, according to authorities.

One of the suspects punched her in the head while the second suspect choked the teen and covered her mouth with his hand, cops said. The second suspect then tried to swipe her pocketbook, but she was able to hold on to it, cops said.

The first suspect attempted to sexually assault her, but both men fled when a passerby approached, according to police.

The victim was taken to Woodhull Medical Center  where she was treated and released.

Police describe both suspects as Hispanic, in their early 30s and 5 feet 5 inches tall. The first suspect  was last seen wearing a striped shirt, white hat, and camouflaged shorts, and had a backpack. The second suspect had a ponytail and was last seen wearing a dark colored shirt with “Aero 199″ on the left sleeve and had a backpack.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

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