Tag Archives: Richmond Hill

Five humongous Queens homes listing under $1M


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Multiple Listing Service and PropertyShark

While new apartments in Queens are getting smaller so developers can maximize profits, the borough still has a  treasure trove of spacious gems in older homes that offer prospective owners the best bang for their buck.

For many, size does matter, so here are five single-family homes with enough space for parents, the kids, grandma and maybe even a crazy uncle or two, and each are under $1 million.

59-35 Menahan St., Ridgewood

This property has seven bedrooms and three bathrooms and was originally built in 1920, according to its listing. It sits on a lot of 5,137 square feet, which has a two-car garage and a private driveway. There is a finished basement and a laundry room as well. The broker is Peter Caruso of Caruso & Boughton Realty, and the asking price is $945,000.

 

105-42 133rd St., Richmond Hill

If you thought that last price was low, this Richmond Hill seven-bedroom home is listed for $649,999. This three-story detached colonial home has three bathrooms and a recreational room in the basement, according to the listing. The residence uses about half of its 5,084-square-foot lot space. Raias Khan of Century 21 is the broker of record.

 

168-04 35th Ave., Flushing

Just in case seven bedrooms wasn’t enough, this three-story colonial style single-family Flushing home offers eight bedrooms, and three full bathrooms, according to the listing. Blocks away from the Auburndale LIRR station, the house is located on a corner property and has 3,087 square feet of space. The residence features a finished basement, which includes a laundry room. It also has a one-car garage. The asking price is $958,000. En Ja Chung of Promise Realty is the broker.

 

88-52 195th Pl., Hollis

Those looking for style with a bargain price may have found it with this large single-family home. The three-story Hollis residence features a formal dining room and living room with French pocket doors, according to its listing. It has seven bedrooms and three and a half bathrooms in 3,400 square feet of space. There is also a two-car garage on the property as well. Emmanuel Babayev of Charles Rutenberg Realty is the broker.

 

11-43 Beach 9th St., Far Rockaway

Access to transportation, a huge house, spacious lot and a bargain price — this home may have it all. This three-story residence sits on a nearly 8,000-square-foot lot and has about 3,500 square feet of living space, according to its listing. The asking price is $879,000. It has seven bedrooms, two bathrooms and a private driveway. The broker is Ann Bienstock of Five Towns Miller Realty.

Rockaway property

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New pastor coming to St. Helen’s in Howard Beach


| slicata@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Salvatore Licata

St. Helen’s Catholic Parish is getting ready to welcome a new pastor to their church.

Father Francis Colamaria will be coming to the Howard Beach parish on Jan. 31, taking over for its current pastor, Msgr. LoPinto. Colamaria is currently the administrative director and priest at Holy Child Jesus Parish in Richmond Hill and is excited about the change.

“Though I will miss Holy Child Jesus, I am really looking forward to serving the people of Howard Beach,” he said. “Msgr. LoPinto did a tremendous job of making new renovations to the church and school, which is great because now I can focus more on the spiritual portion.”

Colamaria, 39, has been a priest since 2001. He started at Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Ozone Park and remained there until 2007. After that, he moved on to St. Ephrem’s in Brooklyn for a year and was also the chaplain at Xaverian High School. He is now the deputy chief chaplain of the MTA and has been at Holy Child Jesus since 2008.

One thing Colamaria is looking forward to is being able to work with the school more closely as he feels Catholic education is very important for children to learn.

“Catholic education provides morals, responsibility and creates love of family and life, which is sometimes lacking in this world,” he said. “It creates a good environment for our children and is one of the best products we have as a church.”

During his time at his current parish, Colamaria has run annual Oktoberfests and huge block parties and made a connection between the parish and school. He is looking forward to bringing some of his new ideas to St. Helen’s and learning from the retired Msgr. Pfeiffer, who he says is “a seasoned veteran.”

LoPinto will be moving on to become the head of Catholic Charities once Colamaria takes over. He said the people of Howard Beach have been through a lot, especially when dealing with the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, but he knows that their spirits have been unchanged.

“The people of Howard Beach are good people,” Colamaria noted. “It is a great environment and I look forward to learning more about it.”

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Four busted for drifting at Flushing Meadows Corona Park


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

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They may have been “Fast and Furious,” but four daredevil drivers ripping through a Queens park weren’t fast enough to escape from the police.

Four men were arrested for what officials describe as “movie-style stunt” performances in a parking lot at Flushing Meadows Corona Park, according to the district attorney’s office.

“Cars are not toys. Driving at high speeds and intentionally skidding a roughly 3,000-pound vehicle, especially where spectators are gathered, is dangerous and can result in tragedy,” District Attorney Richard Brown said. “Following a number of noise complaints from neighborhood residents, the police responded and shut down this illegal and potentially deadly activity. The vehicles have been seized and the drivers have been charged.”

The men used modified vehicles for drifting, a style of driving made popular by the “The Fast and the Furious” movies that combines high speeds and dangerous turns.

Spectators would watch these stunts, where the cars would sometimes allegedly strike other vehicles and stationary objects in the park’s parking lot, the district attorney said.

The four were busted after area residents called 311 to complain about the excessive noise. In total, 66 calls were received, and none have been logged in the neighborhood in the more than five weeks since the men were arrested.

Kareem Ali, 26, and Michael Mahabir, 27, both of Richmond Hill, Joel Santiago, 36, of Maspeth, and Darren Tang, 24, of Manhattan, were arraigned on Oct. 26 on charges of reckless endangerment, reckless driving, speed contests and races and failure to comply with directions, prosecutors said. Ali is also charged with unlawful possession of marijuana. The men, who face up to a year in jail if convicted, were released on their own recognizance.

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Clean streets initiative extended in southeast Queens


| slicata@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy of Councilman Ruben Wills

A successful street-cleaning program in southeast Queens has been extended through May of 2015, officials said.

Commercial corridors in the neighborhoods have long been eyesores due to the accumulation of litter and trash.

But since the Clean Streets, Safe Neighborhoods, Strong Communities (CSS) initiative started in April, this has changed.

“The restoration and revitalization of our community depends on our collective efforts to keep our streets clean and promote safe neighborhoods by having a sense of pride and respect for our area,” state Sen. James Sanders Jr. said. “Through the Clean Streets, Safe Neighborhoods, Strong Communities initiative, we have an opportunity to improve our community and ensure our children grow up in a safe and clean environment.”

The CSS program is a citywide initiative to hammer down on illegal dumpers. It increased fines for those people who illegally dump their garbage and others who use the city garbage cans for residential and commercial trash.

Along with these initiatives, commercial corridors throughout Richmond Hill and other neighborhoods in Queens had periodic clean-ups from the nonprofit organization Wildcat.

The clean-up by Wildcat, in connection with the DNSY, became a popular component of the initiative, according to Councilman Ruben Wills, and the city has expanded the organization’s role and extended its contract.

With the expansion, Wildcat will now clean commercial corridors on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. The organization will also help with snow and leaf removal, as well as removing garbage and other debris from vacant lots and abandoned homes.

Wildcat is a nonprofit organization that provides jobs for underemployed or formerly incarcerated residents of the city.

Wills commended them for the work they have done throughout his district and is looking forward to the continued partnership, but said it is not only on the organization to keep the streets of the neighborhood clean.

“[Wildcat] alone cannot shoulder the load of preserving the cleanliness of our neighborhoods,” Wills noted. “That responsibility also lies with us as citizens, and we all must do our share.”

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MTA bus driver charged after allegedly stabbing wife’s lover in Rockaways


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

POLICE TAPE

Updated Wednesday, Nov. 5, 4:45 p.m. 

A city bus driver from Richmond Hill has been arrested after he allegedly stabbed his romantic rival in Arverne Tuesday afternoon, according to District Attorney Richard Brown.

Ephraim Henry, 30, had completed his route and was driving the empty bus to the depot when he spotted the victim, Oscar Williams.

Williams, 48, was driving a Honda near Beach 67th St. and Beach Channel Drive, when Henry allegedly stopped the bus and began to argue with Williams, who is reportedly involved romantically with Henry’s wife. The two began to fight and Henry stabbed Williams in the arm, Brown said.

Williams survived the incident but had to undergo surgery at a nearby hospital.

Henry was arraigned on Wednesday on charges of assault and criminal possession of a weapon. If convicted, he faces up to 25 years in prison.

The stabbing was within blocks of where several stray bullets hit an MTA bus on Monday night. No one aboard the bus was injured, but a 21-year-old man was hit in the leg. He was taken to the hospital, where he was listed in stable condition.

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Suspect charged in deadly 2013 Richmond Hill shooting


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

Police have arrested a Florida man for the murder of a 23-year-old in Richmond Hill last December.

Gerrard Edwards was near Liberty Avenue and 112th Street at about 3:30 a.m. on Dec. 22 when he was shot, cops said. He was killed after he got into a dispute with a group of men while out with some friends and was then jumped and shot several times in the chest, according to published reports.

Edwards, a Richmond Hill resident, was taken to Jamaica Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

This October, police released information on a suspect wanted in the shooting, 31-year-old David Haridat.

The NYPD said on Tuesday that Haridat, a Miami resident, had been arrested and charged with Edwards’ murder.

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Suspect wanted in connection to 21 Queens, Bronx commercial break-ins


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of the NYPD

Police are looking for a man wanted in connection with a string of citywide commercial burglaries.

In a total of 21 incidents, starting in June in Rosedale and most recently occurring on Oct. 20 in the Bronx, at least one suspect broke into commercial establishments via the roof, side or rear doors, or ventilation ducts while the business were closed, according authorities. Money from the cash register and broken-into ATMs, as well as miscellaneous items, such as cigarettes, were taken during the thefts.

In Queens, the burglaries have occurred in Laurelton, Broad Channel, Jamaica, Astoria, Queens Village, Bayside, Hollis, Glen Oaks, College Point, Richmond Hill and Flushing. The other break-ins all happened in the Bronx.

The NYPD has released surveillance photos of the male suspect wanted in an incident on Sept. 12 in Richmond Hill. During this burglary, at about 8 p.m. the suspect entered 88-24 Van Wyck Expressway via the roof, damaged the security system but did not remove any property, police said.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

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Ridgewood woman recounts childhood abduction to Egypt, escape in YouTube video


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photos © Moral Courage Project 2014

She found the courage to escape. She then found the courage to share her story.

Nashwa El-Sayed was abducted to Egypt from Queens at the age of 2 by her father. After suffering from abuse, years of separation from her mother and an impending arranged marriage at the age of 17, she was finally able to leave the country and return to America.

El-Sayed, now 24, and living in Ridgewood, has since graduated from Queens College with a degree in international relations and recounted her tale, hoping others in her situation will do the same.

“Hopefully they see it as something that can change lives,” she said.

Though El-Sayed has shared her story before, she is telling it in a new medium: video.

The Moral Courage Project, an educational nonprofit started in 2008, posted a video of El-Sayed’s story, “Forced marriage in Egypt: How I escaped,” on its YouTube channel last month.

The nonprofit mentors, teaches and provides role models for people who want to build up moral courage, or do “the right thing in the face of your fears,” according to Adam Grannick, multimedia producer with the Moral Courage Project.

It showcases its role models through videos it creates for its YouTube channel, Moral Courage TV. They are “everyday people” from a middle-schooler facing a bully to corporate whistleblowers and everyone in between.

Launched in April 2012, the videos are accompanied by related social media posts to bring awareness to whatever issue they highlight and can each have their own look, depending on the story.

Since filmmakers didn’t have footage from El-Sayed’s childhood, her video featured animation.
“Animation usually takes away from the seriousness of a story, but this one was not the case,” El-Sayed said.

NashwaElSayedMC7

El-Sayed’s story begins on Father’s Day 1993 — the day she was taken. She was living in Richmond Hill at the time, and her Egyptian father and American mother were in the process of filing for divorce.

“[My mother] knew deep down that she wasn’t going to see me again,” El-Sayed said in the video.

A couple of years after landing in Egypt, El-Sayed was living in Alexandria with her father and a stepmother who physically and emotionally abused her. She also had to be “a pious Muslim girl who should not be seen in public, who should not speak in public.”

At around age 9, she found some relief when her father divorced the woman. He soon married another woman who also tried to abuse El-Sayed, but she retaliated and the woman never tried it again.

Also at 9 years old, she saw her mother for the first time since she was abducted. That moment was when she knew there was another place she belonged to and that she could study what she wanted.

Her mother from then on would send her items from the U.S. — media, such as music from the Backstreet Boys; toys, such as Barbies; new gadgets, such as CD players; and school supplies, such as glitter.

NashwaElSayedMC5

El-Sayed’s father promised she could go to college in America as long as she got good grades. But during her final year of high school, her father told her that he found her a husband and that she was going to meet him on her wedding day in four months.

“All of a sudden there is a major change in plans and that is when I decided it was time to go,” El-Sayed said.

She called her mother in April 2008, who contacted the appropriate authorities, and within a few months El-Sayed was touch with the FBI and American embassy to plan a way out of the country.

But after her father found out about a visit she made to the embassy, she was put on lockdown and became suicidal.

As she recounts in the video, El-Sayed, through luck and bravery, managed to escape while she was at a friend’s house in Cairo.

But El-Sayed’s story and her ups and downs didn’t end with her escape.

NashwaElSayedMC2

Most of the Moral Courage Project videos are two to three minutes long, but El-Sayed’s is 10 minutes.

“I tried cutting it down but it just felt wrong to leave out a lot of it,” said Grannick, who wanted the video to discuss El-Sayed’s life after she returned to America.

Back living in Richmond Hill with her mother, El-Sayed went through a major depression the first year as she tried to figure out her purpose and why she went through what she did.

Her relationship with her mother, good for the first two years, became fractured when differences began to show between them, and they disagreed over El-Sayed’s publicly sharing her story, including a June 2013 Daily News article.

But she considers herself one of the lucky ones. Children around the world are abducted by parents every year, she said, and she is not only one of the few who has survived and is functional, but is one of the few who has also come out with her story and become an activist.

NashwaElSayedMC3

After graduating from Queens College in the summer of 2013, El-Sayed now works with the school’s Ibrahim Leadership and Dialogue Program as the assistant manager. The program gives college students from a variety of religious backgrounds the opportunity to travel to the Middle East to interact with government officials, entrepreneurs, students, educators and philanthropists, create a dialogue and experience what the region is really like.

El-Sayed also works, through the Epic Theatre Ensemble, with a women’s group regarding issues in the Arab American community, and continues to work with the FBI to bring awareness to the issue of childhood abduction by parents.

“It is possible for you to survive,” she says to end the video. “It is possible for you to leave behind the stigmas and actually carry on and make something of yourself.”

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Queens Hindus to celebrate Diwali


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Buddy Singh

BY ASHA MAHADEVAN

After a two-year hiatus, the annual motorcade in Richmond Hill celebrating the Hindu festival of Diwali will drive down Liberty Avenue on Saturday. More than 30 cars will be featured in this celebration of the Festival of Lights, which is traditional to West Indian and Indian communities. Each car will be decorated with flowers, lights and the rich colors associated with the festival. The three best-dressed cars will be awarded cash prizes.

While the motorcade has been an annual event for more than 15 years, the excitement is heightened this year as the event could not be organized the past two years. According to Lakshmee Singh of the Divya Jyoti Association, which organizes the event, the motorcade could not be held in 2012 because city officials were unable to spare the manpower after Hurricane Sandy. In 2013, the association’s request for a permit was denied.

The organizers had to get creative and held a “nagar” or fair where participants installed booths and sold traditional Indo-Caribbean clothes, jewelry and food, while attendees enjoyed a cultural show with dancers performing to classical songs.

motorcade 2011 (508)

“This year, for the first time, we are having both the motorcade and the nagar,” said Singh.
The festivities will begin at 3 p.m. with a “havan” or prayer to Lakshmi, the Hindu goddess of wealth, at the Arya Spiritual Center Grounds at 104-20 133rd St. The motorcade will begin from near Sybil’s Bakery at 133rd St. and Liberty Ave. at 5:30 p.m. It will be followed by a cultural program featuring classical singers and dancers.

The Natya Tilakam Dance Company is participating in both the motorcade and the cultural show, said its founder Dana Marajh. “We are performing a fusion of semi-classical tandava [a dance form] and Bollywood,” said Marajh, as she and her team strung lights and hung curtains in preparation to decorate their car.

They are hopeful about winning the motorcade competition and already have plans for the prize money. “If we win, the proceeds will go toward a clothing drive we are doing for Halloween,” said Marajh.

One of their competitors is Singh’s Roti Shop. “We are hoping to win,” said Shivani Harryginsingh, 28, the shop’s manager, adding that the celebration is a great way for the young generation born and raised in the U.S. to stay in touch with their traditions. “You cannot be a Hindu and not know what it means,” she said. “This is not something you learn in school. You have to learn on your own. It’s our heritage and culture. We need to keep the tradition going.”
The event is free and open to people from all communities.

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Richmond Hill resident wins Sunshine Award for dancing


| slicata@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Dheeraj Gayaram

Guyana native and Richmond Hill resident Dheraaj Gayaram has won more than 150 awards in Indian dancing competitions around the world.

But even after he retired from competition, he is still winning awards.

Gayaram, 49, was honored for his talents at the Sunshine Awards, which recognize excellence in performing arts, education, sports and science in various Caribbean Cultures.

The Sunshine Awards were founded in 1989, and Gayaram was honored in the performing arts category during an Oct. 4 Manhattan ceremony.

“I was really happy because I never thought, at this age, I would win another award,” Gayaram said. “It was an unbelievable.”

Gayaram started his dancing career in Guyana at the age of 9, which is when he won his first award.

He knew at that time that he had a talent for dance but was hesitant to pursue it even though his father begged him to.

“I wanted to be a doctor at the time,” Gayaram said. “But my father was persistent; he wanted me to dance.”

He continued to dance but it was only one of his hobbies until the age of 15 when his father passed away. He then made a choice to take his dancing talents more seriously and turn it into a career.

“From that point I made a choice and there was no turning back,” Gayaram said.

He took first place in nearly every competition he entered, so much so that he was later banned from competing because of how good he was.

In 1989, he moved from Guyana to Richmond Hill, where he continued to crush his competition in Indian dancing. Even though he has had such an illustrious career as a dancer, Gayaram struggles daily with continuing his dream due to the way he is treated by many people.

“I’m 49 years old and people are still making fun of me and trying to hurt me,” said Gayaram, who has two daughters. “There are many times when I think about quitting, but if there is one thing dancing taught me it was to be strong.”

Although Gayaram has encountered an abundance of hurtful people in his life, the huge support system that he has, headed by his children, helps him overcome the cruelty.

dheeraj

“I do it for my daughters,” Gayaram said. “I want to be the best father I can be for them and support them through my talents.”

Done with his competition career, Gayaram focuses his time on his dance studio now. He not only helps his students progress as dancers but also teaches them life lessons that have helped him get to where he is.

“I tell them you have to be happy with yourself. If you don’t like what you see in the mirror, no one will,” Gayaram noted. “Stay strong throughout your life and do not let people get to you.”

When he was honored at the Sunshine Awards, he said he was humbled to be surrounded by so many talented people.

“Just to be on the same stage as some of those people was an accomplishment,” Gayaram said. “It was the icing on the cake.”

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Plans released for possible QueensWay


| slicata@queenscourier.com

Renderings courtesy of thequeensway.org

It’s the Queens way.

A 3.5-mile stretch of recreational, walking and biking trails is planned for central and southern Queens as part of a multi-million dollar proposal that has coined the name, QueensWay.

“This will be a wonderful park for Queens,” said Will Rogers, president of The Trust for Public Land.

The QueensWay plans, proposed by W X Y architecture + urban design, will add a mix of new recreational and cultural opportunities and nature trails for the borough, said the Friends of the QueensWay.

The path, if built, will cross through the neighborhoods of Rego Park, Forest Hills, Glendale, Richmond Hill, Woodhaven and Ozone Park, affecting over 322,000 people living within a mile of it.

In the plans, there are proposed areas for ecology and education, where planners are hoping to build an outdoor classroom for children to be able to learn the biodiversity in Queens.

Also, there will be two sets of trails for bicyclist and pedestrians to ensure the safety of everyone who uses the QueensWay.

Furthermore, there are plans for basketball courts, a skate park, habitat wetlands, arts-related programs and a gateway entrance from the QueensWay to Forest Park.

“Parks are too often neglected and QueensWay would offer more access to open space and parkland,” said state Sen. Toby Ann Stavisky. “Parks provide an economic benefit to local business, retail establishments and restaurants and people of all ages would be able to enjoy the recreational opportunities which this new green space would provide.”

The estimated cost for the QueensWay is $120 million and, if started, will take three to five years to build.

Although it has the backing of many elected officials and community leaders, some feel the narrow stretch of former rail line could be put to better use.

Assemblyman Phil Goldfeder is a staunch advocate for the restoration of the Rockaway Beach rail line, which once ran on the property being looked at for the QueensWay. He has formed a coalition to fight to get it back.

“The QueensWay and Trust for Public Land have wasted taxpayer dollars on expensive, out-of-state consultants and one-sided studies that don’t actually represent the interests or needs of Queens’ families,” Goldfeder said. “Our growing coalition, including the MTA, will continue the fight to expand transit in Queens while easing commutes, creating jobs, cleaning the environment and expanding our economic development.”

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Real estate roundup: New Rego Park building rendering revealed, controversial luxury building opening in Elmhurst


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of GF55 Partners

Revealed: 65-70 Austin Street, Rego Park

“The building, designed by GF55, will fit in perfectly with the other seven-story buildings that have been erected on the south side of Austin Street over the past decade or two. The structures have been filling in a formerly industrial low-rise strip, set up against the Long Island Rail Road’s Main Line, right beside what used to be the Rego Park station, shuttered in 1962.” Read more [New York YIMBY]

Controversial High-End Building Opening as Part of Elmhurst ‘Renaissance’

“A controversial apartment building that was the subject of recent litigation is getting a luxury makeover as part of a hoped-for neighborhood “renaissance,” according to developers.” Read more [DNAinfo]

New program aims to battle the growing graffiti menace in parts of south Queens

“The residents of Richmond Hill, Ozone Park and Woodhaven are about to find out as officials kick off a new anti-graffiti program on Wednesday. For the first time, the Queens Economic Development Corp. is heading the program funded by City Councilman Eric Ulrich.” Read more [New York Daily News]

Bones discovered in Richmond Hill  


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

POLICE TAPE

Authorities are investigating unidentified bones that were unearthed by a utility worker in Richmond Hill Tuesday morning.

A National Grid subcontractor was digging a trench at a site on 108th Street near Jamaica Avenue at about 11:10 a.m. when he found five pieces of bone that appear to be human, cops said.

Police were called and the medical examiner is investigating.

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Man sought in 2013 Richmond Hill murder


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

Police are looking for a man wanted in connection to the deadly shooting of a 23-year-old in Richmond Hill last December.

Gerrard Edwards was near Liberty Avenue and 112th Street at about 3:30 a.m. on Dec. 22 when he was shot, cops said. He was killed after he got into a dispute with a group of men while out with some friends and was then jumped and shot several times in the chest, according to published reports.

Edwards, a Richmond Hill resident, was taken to Jamaica Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

Authorities describe the suspect, David Haridat, 31, as 5 feet 4 inches and about 150 pounds.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

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Richmond Hill manufacturer expanding into new warehouse


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Kalmon Dolgin Affiliates

Richmond Hill-based KPA Studio, a provider of metal, glass, and windows to architectural firms and general contractors, has signed a lease for a 10,000-square-foot building in the neighborhood.

The signing, arranged by real estate firm Kalmon Dolgin Affiliates, is for the one-story building at 91-20 130th St. and will expand operations for KPA Studio. Its original location in the neighborhood is at 130-29 91st Ave. A majority of the new facility will be used for aluminum production, according to Kalmon’s Dmitri Gourianov, who handled the leasing. 

KPA has supplied various architectural firms with materials for projects around the city, including the Kupferberg Holocaust Resource Center at Queensborough Community College, which is designed by TEK Architects, the Brooklyn Bowery and some H&M locations.

The new KPA location has 18-foot ceilings, three drive-in doors, and is located near the E, J, and Z subway lines.

There are a number of manufacturing and construction companies in the area of the new location, Gourianov said, including sheet metal, window and doors, and food production.

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