Tag Archives: Revival Home Health Care

HEALTH CRISIS


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Just when we thought Peninsula Hospital had gotten the life-saving CPR it needed, it seems the facility is once again flatlining.

Late last month, the hospital was barred from accepting new patients after the State Department of Health (DOH) shut down the lab. Reportedly, there was expired blood plasma and staffers handling samples were not wearing gloves.

Now, 230 employees — nurses, emergency room personnel and support staff — have been let go as a result.

And, as if that weren’t bad enough, the judge overseeing Peninsula’s Chapter 11 proceedings is ordering a trustee be appointed to handle all operations at the facility.

What is going on?

It seems that no one did their homework when it came to Revival Home Health Care, which took over the cash-strapped Peninsula from MediSys last year.

Already $60 million in debt at the time, Peninsula was seemingly “saved” by Steve Zakheim, whose wife owns Revival, but who was reportedly required by the DOH to sign an affidavit that he would steer clear of Revival’s operations.

Did anyone know this before Revival took over Peninsula? Or was the ink dry before the vetting process was complete?

And there are also concerns over a conflict of interest, since Todd Miller, former Chief Operating Officer for Revival, is now serving as Peninsula’s chief executive.

A very shrewd Zakheim reportedly included a provision that allows him to withdraw his offer if a trustee is appointed — meaning Peninsula may be forced to close after all.

We had hoped that the hospital would enter a new “chapter,” but it seems that its “revival” might be ill-fated.

 

Peninsula will make payroll


| mchan@queenscourier.com

The doors of Peninsula Hospital will be kept open, according to hospital officials.

“We’re definitely reaching payroll,” said Liz Sulik, the hospital’s director of external affairs.

The embattled Far Rockaway facility was previously in danger of not meeting payroll after December 26 without a cash infusion.

But now, the hospital is “moving forward at a steady pace.”

“We’re meeting the challenges as they arise, and we’re looking forward to a very bright future,” Sulik said.

Peninsula and its creditors will return to bankruptcy court on Thursday, December 22.

Sulik declined to comment on court proceedings, although published reports say the court will discuss a $3 million loan to the hospital from Revival Home Health Care, which took over hospital operations in September.

Joseph P. Addabbo Family Health Center has hope


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Officials of the Joseph P. Addabbo Family Health Center — and 15 students in the complex’s Children’s Day Treatment program — are hoping they won’t be left out on the streets the second the clock strikes midnight on New Year’s Day.

The health center and its treatment program have been housed by Peninsula Hospital in Far Rockaway for over 10 years.

But close to a month ago, Peninsula’s new management, Revival Home Health Care, said they needed the space back — and by the end of the year — in order to expand the hospital’s emergency room, according to officials.

Now — after first receiving notice to vacate the premises in only three months — Dr. Peter Nelson, the CEO of Addabbo Center, said the program has hope in its frantic search for a new home and more time.

“The message got through to him,” Nelson said of Todd Miller, the hospital’s new CEO, whom he had recently met with regarding the time frame of the removal process. “I think at this point, we’ve got his attention. He wanted to be reasonable, and he wanted to see that we were working hard to find a new place. I think we’ll be able to have more time to relocate than by December 31.”

Miller told The Courier that he has in fact granted the program an extension, but did not specify how long.

He said program officials, Peninsula personnel and representatives from the Department of Mental Health will meet next week on December 7 to discuss plans moving forward, including how much time will be actually needed.

“We’re not going to put them out on the street,” he said. “We’ve always been open to a solution that works for everyone. There was just a process that we needed to go through to make sure [program officials] were focused on the fact that they ultimately needed to find a new space.”

He said he was working closely with officials at the Department of Mental Health, as well as elected officials, including State Senator Joseph Addabbo Jr., to move forward, but no plans have been set in stone.

“It’s unfortunate that Mr. Miller is going to make a decision not to have the day treatment program at the hospital,” said Addabbo, who had also met with Miller to discuss the status of the center. “He feels that he wants to expand services of Peninsula Hospital, and I commend him for that and I commend him for his vision for the hospital, but it’s important to continue the program for the children and to find an alternative space for them.”

Addabbo said the one agreement made during his most recent meeting with Miller was that Miller would be “reasonable in providing the program enough time to find an appropriate, accessible space.”

“I appreciate that courtesy. It is an important program for these children, and the families depend on it,” Addabbo said.

The Children’s Day Treatment program provides clinical and academic services for children aged eight to 10, as well as therapeutic services — including individual and group therapy, psychiatry and parental guidance and counseling. The majority of the students are from the Rockaway community, according to officials, and suffer from profound behavioral and emotional difficulties.

“We’re just trying to make a plan about how we would move, when we would move and get them to work with us around that plan rather than work to try to evict us,” said Ronald Lamb, the program’s director. “I hope that it will lead to a mutually beneficial solution.”

Could it be the spirit of the season?


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

It might still be the worst way to start off a New Year.

Officials of the Joseph P. Addabbo Family Health Center in Far Rockaway — and 15 students in the complex’s Children’s Day Treatment program — are hoping they won’t be left on the street the second the clock strikes midnight on New Year’s Day.

With time winding down, Peninsula Hospital’s new management, Revival Home Health Care, had said they needed the space back by December 31 in order to expand the hospital’s emergency room, according to hospital officials.

Parents, staff, elected officials – and we at The Queens Courier – were outraged, especially since only three months’ notice was given for the Center to find a new home.

How could Revival seemingly be so heartless?

But, with a mere month to go, Dr. Peter Nelson, CEO of Addabbo Center, said that Todd Miller, CEO of Revival, has agreed to be “reasonable in providing the program enough time to find an appropriate, accessible space.”

Even State Senator Joseph Addabbo Jr., for whose father the Center is named, intervened on behalf of the children, meeting with Miller to discuss the status of the center.

We commend Dr. Nelson and Senator Addabbo on their efforts on behalf of the children.

As you know, The Courier has a long and storied history of advocacy, and we feel kudos are in order for these two men.

Now, we can only hope that Miller and Revival will be moved by the spirit of the season.