Tag Archives: repairs

Subway service returns to normal in Queens as derailment investigation continues


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo: MTA / Patrick Cashin

Updated Monday, May 5, 5:20 p.m.

As transit service returns to normal following a subway derailment in Woodside Friday, the MTA continues to investigate the derailment and why a section of rail at the accident site broke.

A preliminary investigation has found that the broken rail that was discovered where the train derailed was manufactured last November and installed this March, the MTA said.

“The MTA has not determined how or why the rail broke. Speed or human error do not appear to be a factor [in the derailment],” MTA spokesman Kevin Ortiz said.

The broken rail section will be sent for testing as the investigation into the derailment’s cause continues.

In a release Saturday, the transit agency emphasized its safety record, and track and other maintenance efforts, and said the city’s subway system has experienced only 17 mainline derailments in the last decade.

Crews spent the weekend removing the subway train that derailed about 10:25 a.m. Friday just south of the 65th and Broadway R and M local stop. By 5 a.m. Monday E, F, M and R service, which had been affected by the accident, had returned to normal along the Queens Boulevard line.

The Brooklyn-bound F train was on the express track when the six center cars of the eight-car train derailed, injuring 19 and forcing about a 1,000 riders to evacuate, officials said. Of those hurt, 15 suffered minor injuries and four were taken to the hospital with potentially serious injuries.

 

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Stranger pays for elderly Queens couple’s sidewalk repairs


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

A good Samaritan — and complete stranger — has stepped up to aid an embattled, elderly Whitestone couple burdened with the charge of sidewalk repairs they say should not have been on their hands to begin with.

Judith Smith, 68, and her husband Everett, 71, were told by the city’s Department of Transportation in June to fix two concrete slabs, totaling 70 square feet of sidewalk, deemed broken and improperly sloped, according to a notice of violation issued by the agency.

But the furious pair said the defective squares are not their legal responsibility, pointing to their house deed as proof. The slabs, instead, are connected to an adjacent community driveway, jointly owned by the 22 homeowners on the street, they said.

The 14-foot driveway — or “right of way,” as described in the couple’s mortgage — leads up to a parking area filled with 22 separate garages and belongs to each of the homeowners along 147-23 Willets Point Boulevard.

The total cost of repair should be split between each of the homeowners, the Smiths said, but since their home is planted directly next to the easement — located in the middle of the residential street — the charge for repairs and role of the lot’s sole caretaker involuntarily had come barreling down on them.

According to the city’s repair guideline prices, the landowners of 30 years, who rely on retirement income, could have found themselves shelling out close to $700.

But after The Courier first reported the couple’s grievance in a detailed August 30 cover story, the Smiths were then reached out to by a major television network. Their troubles were broadcast at 8 a.m. on Tuesday, September 4, and within 30 minutes, the Smiths said they received a phone call from a private cement company contractor who wanted to help them out for free.

“I’m thrilled. I couldn’t be happier. I’m really indebted to them,” Judith said. “He’s taken the liberty to dip into his own pockets to repair two flags that I should really sue the neighbors for. I’m forever grateful to him.”

The couple’s hero, who they have yet to meet, wanted to remain anonymous.

Whitestone couple faces walkway woes


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

An infuriated Whitestone couple has a bone to pick with the city after they were pinned for violations on 70 square feet of sidewalk outside their property line.

The city’s Department of Transportation (DOT) told Judith and Everett Smith this June to fix two broken and improperly sloped concrete slabs of sidewalk, according to a notice of violation issued by the agency. But the furious pair said the defective squares are not their legal responsibility — pointing to their deed as proof — and instead are connected to an adjacent community driveway, jointly owned by the 22 homeowners on the street.

The 14-foot driveway — or “right of way,” as described in the couple’s mortgage — leads up to a parking area filled with 22 separate garages and belongs to each of the homeowners along 147-23 Willets Point Boulevard.

But since the Smiths’ home is planted directly next to the easement — located in the middle of the residential street — the charge for repairs and role of the lot’s sole caretaker involuntarily came barreling down on the embattled landowners.

“I feel dejected,” said Judith, 68. “We shouldn’t be held accountable for fixing it.”

The Smiths, Whitestone residents for 30 years, had recently made repairs to two other defective sidewalk slabs outside their home, shelling out close to $600 to do so, they said. But costs to maintain the two slabs connected to the driveway, they said, should be split between the 22 homeowners who share the garage area.

“Every house should be forced to pay for it,” said Everett, 71. “It’s disappointing. I wouldn’t live in the city if I had to do it all over. They’re chasing people out. Why should I pay for everybody here and they get the benefit?”

The total cost of repairs was unknown as of press time, but according to the DOT’s guideline prices, the Smiths, who rely on retirement income, could find themselves out of pocket close to another $700.

A spokesperson for the DOT said the owners of the two properties adjacent to the driveway entrance are responsible for making the sidewalk corrections.

“This responsibility remains regardless of any separate arrangement the property owners may have made with other parties for use of the parking area,” the spokesperson said.

The homeowner living on the other side of the driveway declined to comment when approached by The Courier. But neighbor John Holmes, who lives in one of the 22 houses along the easement, said he would not mind relieving some of the Smiths’ burden.

“It seems to make sense for all of us to foot the money. It’s a common driveway,” Holmes said. “The city has to assign it to somebody, but everybody uses it. It’s everybody’s problem.”