Tag Archives: Rego Park

Health Department to treat parts of Queens against West Nile


| editorial@queenscourier.com

Images Courtesy of NYC Department of Health

On Tuesday, Aug. 19, the Health Department will treat parts of Queens to help reduce the mosquito population and the risk of West Nile virus.

The treatment, which will spray pesticide from trucks, will take place between the hours of 8:15 p.m. and 6 a.m. the following morning. In case of bad weather, the application will be delayed until Wednesday, Aug. 20. during the same hours.

For this spraying, the Health Department will use a very low concentration of Anvil® 10+10, a synthetic pesticide. When properly used, this product poses no significant risks to human health.

The Health Department recommends that people take the following precautions to minimize direct exposure:

• Whenever possible, stay indoors during spraying. People with asthma or other respiratory conditions are encouraged to stay inside during spraying since direct exposure could worsen these conditions.

• Air conditioners may remain on, however, if you wish to reduce the possibility of indoor exposure to pesticides, set the air conditioner vent to the closed position, or choose the re-circulate function.

• Remove children’s toys, outdoor equipment, and clothes from outdoor areas during spraying. If outdoor equipment and toys are exposed to pesticides, wash them with soap and water before using again.

• Wash skin and clothing exposed to pesticides with soap and water. Always wash your produce thoroughly with water before cooking or eating.

LOCATIONS:

Parts of Corona, Forest Hills, Forest Hill Gardens, Flushing, Kew Gardens Hills, Queensboro Hill and Rego Park (Bordered  by Long Island Expressway, College Point Boulevard and Booth Memorial Avenue to the north; 99th Street, 67th Avenue and Austin Street to the west; Jackie Robinson Parkway and Grand Central Parkway to the south; and Main Street to the east)

Parts of Bellrose, Douglaston, Floral Park, Hollis Hills, Glen Oaks and Little Neck (Bordered by Long Island Expressway, Douglaston Parkway and Van Zandt Avenue to the north; Cloverdale Boulevard,73rd Avenue and Springfield Boulevard to the west; Hillside Avenue to the south; Little Neck Parkway, Leith Road, Hewlett Street and Langdale Street to the east.)

 

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ULTA Beauty opens up in Glendale shopping center


| slicata@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Salvatore Licata

It was a beauty-full day on Friday at The Shops at Atlas Park as it welcomed ULTA Beauty to its complex.

This is ULTA Beauty’s second store to come to Queens with the first location opening up in Rego Park three years ago. The 10,000-square foot location at the Glendale shopping center has more than 20,000 products for both men and women. It features 20,000 beauty products, 4,000 testers and more than 1,000 scents while also offering in-store services for skin care, hair and eyebrows.

More than 200 people lined up for its Aug. 15 grand opening with the first 100 receiving gift certificates ranging from $5 to $100 for future purchases.  The store will also be offering free makeovers and consultations all weekend.

“ULTA is all things beauty, all in one place,” said Kelly Smith, who manages all grand openings for ULTA Beauty.  “We are truly a beauty destination for Glendale, and our ULTA beauty experts are ready to help with all of your beauty needs, from the basics to the perfect shade of lipstick to the newest hair tool.”

 

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Rego Park special needs school closing, displacing vulnerable students


| slicata@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photo by Salvatore Licata

A Rego Park school for children with special needs closes on Friday and many of the disabled students of the year-round school have nowhere to go, family members told The Courier.

Life-Skills School, which served students with mental and secondary emotional challenges ages 9 through 21, was the only school of its kind in Queens.

Its closure leave a vulnerable population without a local specialized school to go to.

“I have no real options for my brother right now,” Theresa Michie, whose brother Randy attended Life-Skills, said. “I don’t know what else to do.”

Parents and guardians of about 43 students received a notice from the school saying it was closing in 90 days, as required by the state, but many say they were not given enough time to make other arrangements.

While some parents have already found schools for their children, many children have yet to be placed.

“No one knew until late May that this was going to happen,” said Peg Rasmussen, whose daughter Gabriella goes to the school. “It was cruel to wait so long to tell us.”

Rasmussen was one of the lucky ones. She said she was able to place her daughter in an appropriate school with the assistance of state Sen. Joe Addabbo’s office.

“I was very fortunate to be able to help Mrs. Rasmussen and her daughter,” state Sen. Addabbo said, “but there are still children that need the proper assistance.

Barbara Hendricks, director of the Life-Skills board of trustees, said she only gave the allotted amount of time because she was trying to look for other options and because if she had told families earlier, she would have had “pure chaos on [her] hands.”

“The school was running on a deficit for years now,” Hendricks said. “We wouldn’t have been able to fund the programs our students need this year. I did not want to do this. It was a very difficult decision.”

Life-Skills is a nonprofit private school that is publicly funded by New York State. With salaries, high rent prices and the lack of enrollment, the school did not have enough money and now must shut its doors, according to Hendricks.

When the closure notices went out, each child was paired with case worker to help with the placement process. The options for many parents depended on the classification of disabilities their children have. Some children were placed in private specialized schools in Queens, but others were given the option of going out of the borough or to District 75 public schools, such as Randy was offered.

But some children, like Randy, who go to Life-Skills have been let down by public schooling already, which makes his sister reluctant to put him back in the system.

“I took him out of public school already because it was not working for him,” said Michie, who lives in Astoria. “Now, the only school like Life-Skills that is currently willing to take him is in Westchester. I can’t send him there.”

There were many days that Michie had to rush over to Life-Skills because of situations involving her brother.

She said if she sends Randy to Westchester and a problem arose it would take her over an hour to get there, which is too long for her to feel safe.

Hendricks said that 95 percent of the displaced children have been offered slots in private schools “all over” the city and surrounding counties, but 13 families had yet to accept the outplacement. She added that she frequently follows up with the Department of Education and that they are working closely with all students to place them in schools that work for them.

For now, guardians and parents who do not like the options they were given will have to keep looking for viable schools. Michie said it is very difficult to find a school close enough for a child with multiple disabilities, like her brother Randy.

“We just have to hope that we can find a place to send Randy,” Michie, who cancelled a trip to Florida just in case she has to meet with a school, said. “[Since she got the letter] It’s been a headache every day.”

 

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Rego Park man facing eviction jumps to death: reports


| editorial@queenscourier.com


A Rego Park man jumped four stories to his death Monday after a marshal came to serve him an eviction notice, according to published reports.

The 61-year-old man leapt from his Wetherole Street apartment window at about 12:45 p.m., the New York Post said, and fell into the building’s courtyard when he heard the knocking at his door.

He was pronounced dead at the scene.

 

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79-year-old woman fatally struck by van in Rego Park


| ctumola@queenscourier.com



An elderly pedestrian was killed Friday morning after she was hit by a van in Rego Park, cops said

The victim, a 79-year-old woman, who has yet to be identified by police, was trying to cross 99th Street at about 8:40 a.m. when she was struck as the vehicle was making a left-hand turn from 62nd Road, authorities said.

The woman was taken to Elmhurst Hospital, where she was pronounced dead.

Police said the driver remained on the scene and the NYPD’s Collision Investigation Squad is investigating.

 

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Queens filmmaker co-creates first ‘TV series’ made exclusively for Instagram


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of “Artistically Challenged”

A Queens man and his fellow filmmakers are hoping their “TV series” is an Insta-nt hit.

Artistically Challenged,” the first “TV series” written, directed, shot and formatted specifically for Instagram, launched on July 1, with seven episodes. Rego Park resident Aleks Arcabascio, and co-producers and co-writers Samuel Delmara and Jeremy Boros, are releasing an episode each day until the end of the month, when all 32 videos will be available on the photo sharing app.

“Instagram is where my friends and family my age spend so much of their time and attention anyway and if that’s where the eyeballs are at, why not make something for them?” Arcabascio said.

The series, shot over two weeks in more than 20 locations throughout New York City, including several in Queens, surrounds the story of Nick Romaine, played by Boros. Romaine is a struggling young artist “who tells a small lie and becomes an overnight celebrity only to find that his success comes with a hefty price.” Among the crazy characters that Romaine meets are powerful players in the New York art world, and the series examines the fine line between art and trash, according to the creators.

One of the biggest challenges for the writing trio was penning the series within Instagram’s 15-second video time limit.

They saw an advantage, however, in the platform’s ability to share content, and tag the entire series with the account name.

“The ultimate compliment is that people are sharing [the show],” Delmara said.

The filmmakers also had to work with a 640-by-640 pixel square screen to fit the smartphone format.

Queens resident Aleks Arcabascio (right) helps set up a shot while directing “Artistically Challenged.”

Arcabascio, who also co-directed “Artistically Challenged” with Delmara, compared the “minimalist storytelling” process to making a silent film.

“A lot of what we knew about film grammar got thrown out the window when we understood the time and space we had to use,” he said.

Filming was made easier by their volunteer crew and others who helped them along the way, including those who lent them spaces to shoot scenes.

One of those locations was Arcabascio’s parents’ Long Island City pizzeria, An Italian Affair, where they filmed episode 2. Episode 21 was shot in the Astoria dentist office of his father’s friend.

His parents also own Redken Saloon Salon in Astoria, and the place was used as a home base when filming the dentist scenes. The salon is also where Arcabascio honed his filmmaking skills. As a young boy he would make flip books out of Post-it pads when he would help sweep hair off the floor for tips on Saturdays.

Arcabascio, who was born in Whitestone and moved to Long Island as a child, turned to animation in middle school and soon discovered video. Shortly after graduating from NYU in 2012, where he studied film and television, he settled in Rego Park. Since that time has kept busy with several production, writing and directing projects, including creating the web series “The Four Thirty in the Morning Show.”

He would like his future filmmaking plans to include another season of “Artistically Challenged.”
Arcabascio also hopes their endeavor will inspire similar Instagram creations.

“The limits are pretty concrete, but the possibilities are endless,” he said. “I can’t wait to see where it goes and I’m glad we’re a part of that.”

Episodes of “Artistically Challenged” can be viewed on Instagram at @actheseries.

 

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New architecture exhibit shows possibilities for QueensWay


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

Image courtesy of Carrie Wilbert

A new exhibition is opening Thursday that features winners of a QueensWay design competition.

The Center for Architecture will be hosting the exhibit, “QueensWay Connection: Elevating the Public Realm,” and the competition, which occurred earlier this year, was held by The Emerging New York Architects committee of the American Institute of Architecture.

In the competition, contestants were asked to come up with theoretical designs for what the 3.5-mile stretch from Rego Park to Ozone Park could be used for. The four winning designs and an honorable mention of the biennial competition will now go on to be displayed in Manhattan, where the Center of Architecture is located.

The QueensWay, an abandoned rail line, has been a point of much debate and controversy, with advocates arguing that it should be turned into a high line-style park.

Since the LIRR Rockaway Beach Line was abandoned in the 1960s, little has been changed to the elevated train. But over the last few years, The Trust for Public Land and Friends of the Queensway are currently studying the area.

New York Assemblyman Phil Goldfeder, along with the Queens College Urban Studies Department, launched a community impact study to help assess the best use for the line.

The competition received 120 entries form 28 countries. They were judged, according to the EMergin New York Architects, “based on the design’s ability to provide an effective and welcoming transition between the street and future greenway.”

But the assumption that the line will be a “future greenway” is a premature  at this point.


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Mini-documentary features ‘remarkable stories’ from Queens magic shop


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Michael “Six” Muldoon


America already knows he’s “Got Talent.” A new mini-documentary is now showing how one Queens magician has helped a pair of local tricksters and countless others through his shop.

“The Magic Man,” a six-minute film recently released on YouTube as part of Bacardi’s The Untameable Series, features Rogue Magic and Funshop on Queens Boulevard in Elmhurst.

The store is owned by 35-year-old Briarwood magician Roger “Rogue” Quan who appeared on the July 1 episode of “America’s Got Talent,” and also owns Rogue Magic Bar & Theatre in Rego Park.

Quan opened the store in 2000, and in addition to selling tricks, the business became like a sanctuary for local youngsters.

“I pushed these kids. If they needed money, needed a place to stay,” Quan said, he helped them out. “I created another family and they helped me out.”

Two of those people’s stories are the focus of “The Magic Man” — Ridgewood resident Michael “Six” Muldoon and Brooklyn native Devonte Rosero.

Both men have made careers out of magic after dealing with personal struggles.

At a young age, Muldoon, now 25, coped with having a sixth finger and weight issues. His Maspeth house burned downed when he was 11 and his parents separated around that time.

Muldoon found magic at about age 13, and bought his first trick from Quan’s store.

“It kind of became an addiction after that,” said Muldoon, who eventually started working at the shop.

Quan not only helped give Muldoon the confidence he needed, but also his stage name — ”Six.”

“He gave us a place to connect, to be open, to find ourselves,” Muldoon said.

After Muldoon nearly died from a ruptured spleen at 18, and was looking to give back, Rosero, who had just met the founder of Magicians Without Borders, suggested that Muldoon work with the organization.

Today, the two are still involved with the group, which travels to more than 30 countries “using magic to entertain, educate and empower.”

They also both started System 6 Magic, a company that produces playing cards and DVDs, and have each become accomplished performers and entrepreneurs.

Though he became interested in magic at an early age, in his teen years Rosero, now 24, started associating with local street gangs.

After landing in the hospital, Rosero received a call from Quan, whose shop he used to go to four or five years earlier, urging him to try out for a magic competition, he recalls in “The Magic Man.”

“If Rouge had not called me, I would be in jail or dead,” Rosero said.

The mini-documentary is not the first time Quan’s magic shop and some of the people it’s helped have been captured on film.

A full-length documentary called “The Magic Men,” featuring Rosero and another local magician, Miles Thorn, was screened at the Woodstock Film Festival in 2013. The film’s producer is trying to get it distributed for full release in New York City, according to Quan. He believes it may have been the reason the filmmakers behind the Bacardi piece came calling.

The aim of the Bacardi series is to tell “remarkable stories of irrepressible spirits from around the world.”

Some of that spirit is summed up in how Quan answers the question about why he does what he does in the documentary.

“Why do I do it? Because I want people to believe. That’s what magic’s all about.”

 

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WATCH: Queens magician performs staple gun Russian roulette on ‘America’s Got Talent,’ wows judges


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo by Craig Blankenhorn/NBC


Queens magician Roger “Rogue” Quan took his chances with one out of four loaded staple guns on “America’s Got Talent” Tuesday night and four out of four judges loved it.

The Briarwood resident and owner of  Rogue Magic and Funshop in Elmhurst performed his staple gun Russian roulette routine on the July 1 episode.

Judge Mel B acted as an assistant, loading one industrial staple gun and shuffling it with three empty ones in a bag. Then, using her “woman’s intuition” she had to pick the three empty ones out of the bag and fire each of them at his temple.

“Do not trust me,” Mel B said as she was about to choose the third gun.

But Quan did trust her, and it was empty. Then, with the fourth gun, he stapled a photo of himself into a piece of wood.

The “dangerous magic” trick as Quan described it rendered Mel B and fellow judges Heidi Klum, Howie Mandel and Howard Stern nervous during the performance and impressed at the finish.

But most importantly it left them wanting more.

“I haven’t seen anything like it. I thought you were fantastic. I want to see more of you,” Klum said.

“You entertained us. It was a great presentation. After seeing that I can’t wait to see you again and that’s how this works,” Stern said.

“It was the most fulfilling moment of my performing career,” Quan told The Queens Courier.

Quan is now slated to appear on Judgment Week later this month, where it will be decided which 48 acts will compete in the live show.

 

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Queens magician to perform on ‘America’s Got Talent’


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo by Craig Blankenhorn/NBC / Below photos courtesy of Roger “Rogue” Quan


Will Briarwood resident Roger “Rogue” Quan be able to work his magic on the “America’s Got Talent” judges this Tuesday night?

The 35-year-old owner of Rogue Magic and Funshop in Elmhurst will appear on the July 1 episode where he will perform a “dangerous magic” act.

Quan is not only aiming for the reality competition’s $1 million prize, but also hopes the show will help him become a world-known performer.

His passion for magic started when he was 6 years old and saw David Copperfield make the Statue of Liberty disappear.

“After that I guess I got bit by the magic bug,” Quan said.

He was soon asking his family to buy him magic tricks, reading books on the art and started performing for whoever wanted to watch, even charging for the shows.

Growing up in Queens, where he lived in Jackson Heights most of his life, magic was just a hobby for Quan.

Following college, the art major had several jobs, but “nothing made me totally happy but performing,” he said.

Quan then took to the streets to sell magic tricks out of a backpack and perform. He later moved the operation to his parent’s home, where people would also come to learn from him.

But Quan knew he needed a proper space and in 2000 found a Rego Park bookstore that had a counter he could use for his burgeoning business. After seven months, the store had to close down, and he decided it was time for his own store. But it wasn’t easy to find someone who would rent to a young man with a magic shop.

He eventually found an affordable space at his current location at 85-08 Queens Blvd., and opened his store in August 2000.

“I was like the king of Queens,” Quan said, describing his business when it first started.

With the Internet and competition from other stores, business is much tougher for his magic shop today, he admits.

“As technology progresses people have seen the bigger things in the world, and magic is pushed aside. It is hard to really impress people nowadays.”

In addition to selling magic tricks, magic performance DVDs, spy equipment and costumes, his store also provides magic classes, entertainers for hire, and has magic and comedy shows.  But he is now trying to transition the business into more of a magic school.

He also has another venture, the Rogue Magic Bar, which opened inside of Panda Asian Bistro in Rego Park this March. The bar, which is about “bringing Vegas to Queens,” features magically-served drinks, magic shows and other entertainment.

As Quan tries to promote his businesses, he is trying to boost his magic career, and “America’s Got Talent” could be his way to do it.

Friends and family were telling him to try out for the show for a long time, but a tweet from the show, saying they were looking for unique talent like him, finally persuaded him to go for it.

“I’m not a very competitive person,” he said.

Quan does everything from close-up to stage magic, including card tricks and illusions with levitation, but excels at magic that has an element of danger to it, which he performed for “America’s Got Talent” judges  Heidi Klum, Mel B, Howie Mandel and Howard Stern.

“I really enjoy the danger magic because of the way people react. It’s priceless,” Quan said.

Quan is not the first Queens resident to appear on “America’s Got Talent” this season.

Mike “Mighty Atom Jr.” Greenstein , a 93-year-old Rockaway man, performed his strongman act on the season nine premiere last month, where he earned three out of four yeses from the judges.

To see how Quan did on the July 1 episode of “America’s Got Talent,” click here

 

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Astoria-based Stitchin’ Queens brings together members with a love for crafts


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo by Jaime Burger

An Astoria-based group is knitting together women of all ages from throughout Queens who share a love for crafts.

Stitchin’ Queens is a knitting, crochet, needlework and general craft group that gets together every two weeks at the Astoria Panera Bread, located at 38-01 35th Ave., to practice the craft, eat and socialize.

The group originally began in 2007 under a different name and in 2012 Danielle Burger, who was a member of the group since it started, took over and changed the name. Since then, Burger has started to advertise the group and establish a Facebook presence as well, in order to attract new members.

“I really enjoyed [the group] because you get to meet other people you wouldn’t otherwise meet,” said Burger, who moved to Rego Park from Astoria in 2008. “It’s not a place to come and put your head down and just knit or crochet. It’s a social experience.”

Burger has also created a group on Ravelry.com, a website for knitters, crocheters, designers, spinners, weavers and dyers to share information and research projects, patterns and much more.

Stitchin’ Queens, which varies in the number of members because some move or can’t make meetings, according to Burger, not only brings together people who share the same love for the craft but also opens doors for members to socialize and learn from each other.

Cheryl Pasternack, 67, from Kew Gardens has been involved in Stitchin’ Queens since 2008 and found it to be a great outlet to pick up knitting once again since stopping in her college years.


                                 Cheryl Pasternack knitting 

“I wanted to start knitting again and I knew that unless I got involved in a group I wouldn’t do it,” said Pasternack, who is currently knitting a sweater and hat for her nephew who will be born in August. “I am older than most of the people in the group and I find that it is amazing because it opened a whole new world for me.”

Pasternack said the group members have helped her develop the skill being left-handed and also help her whenever she has issues with technology.

Astoria resident Franchesca Bisignano, 26, has been knitting for the past three years and says she likes the environment of getting together with the members of Stitchin’ Queens and attends the meetings for the social aspect.

“You get to interact and see what other people are working on,” Bisignano said. “It’s a great way to get ideas on new projects. It’s just amazing — the spectrum of women that you meet is so broad and its women that I wouldn’t have met otherwise. We get along so well, we have the same characteristics.”

The next Stitchin’ Queens meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, June 18. For more info visit www.facebook.com/stitchin.queens.

 

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New retail space coming to Rego Park


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Rendering Courtesy of Winick Realty Group

New retail opportunities are coming to Rego Park just blocks from three major Queens malls.

Leasing has begun on 8,095 square feet of ground retail space at 92-77 Queens Blvd., which is currently under construction, Winick Realty Group announced. The site is expected to be move-in ready by 2015.

“We truly believe that this is an unparalleled opportunity for any retailer to position themselves in front of three major malls, Queens Boulevard, the Long Island Expressway, two subway lines and 10 bus lines,” said Winick Realty Group real estate broker Robert Heicklen.

Located adjacent to Rego Center and blocks away from Queens Center and Queens Place malls, 92-77 offers retailers 35 feet of all-glass frontage on 93rd Street and front- and rear-facing backlit signage.

Deals including one for a 16,000-square foot fitness center and another for a “well-known national coffee brand” are pending for two of the three spaces on the property, according to Winick Realty Group. The overall site features a 400-square-foot loading dock and on-site parking.

According to a Winick Realty Group online flyer, Retro Fitness and Starbucks are expected soon.

“Winick Realty Group is excited to represent this type of high-profile, high-visibility exclusive as we continue to expand our leasing efforts in the borough of Queens,” said Winick Realty Group President Steven Baker.

 

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Suspects try to nab birds from Rego Park pet store: cops


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of NYPD

Two men are accused of stealing an assortment of birds from a Rego Park pet store, minutes after trying to burglarize a dental office down the street.

In addition to taking the animals, the pair also swiped bird cages from the Petland Discounts on 63rd Drive near Saunders Street at about 3:20 a.m. Wednesday before dumping them in a nearby alleyway, cops said.

The break-in triggered the store alarm and the manager was called, according to police. The birds, which included a white ringneck, a red bronze canary and several varieties of finches, along with three cages, were then found next to the store.

Around 2:55 a.m., the suspects also attempted to burglarize a dentist office, located at 94-24 63rd Drive, but fled without taking anything, officials said.

Police describe both suspects as 17 to 20 years old and about 5 feet 8 inches to 5 feet 11 inches tall.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

 

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EXCLUSIVE: A new old way to look at the New York State Pavilion


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy Natali S. Bravo

Follow me @liamlaguerre

 

 

Many people dream of time travel, but Rego Park freelance photographer Natali Bravo has actually completed a photo essay through time.

Using a 1964 World’s Fair Kodak camera and vintage film, Bravo captured the opening of the New York State Pavilion to the public last month through the same lens that people a half-century ago would have been able to use. She developed and released the photos exclusively to The Courier for readers to view.

Bravo, who is also a camera collector, found the old Kodak being sold online from a woman in Virginia in February. It was a bargain at $25, as currently, the rare camera runs for about five times that price on average on eBay.

About two months later, the shutterbug found someone selling six rolls of vintage film for just $35. And a week after that, she learned that the New York State Pavilion — a space-like relic left over from the 1964-65 World’s Fair — would be opening to the public for the first time in decades.

“I couldn’t believe it,” Bravo said. “I had the camera and the film, so the universe was telling me something here.”
She seized the opportunity to capture the event with her vintage Kodak.

With her half-century-old Kodak slung by her side, Bravo shot 39 frames from the camera of the pavilion, politicians and people viewing the wonders of the structure.

The Darkroom, a business in California, developed the images, which revealed rich black-and-white shots of the modern day pavilion opening, making the event look as though it took place 50 years ago.

Bravo felt delighted to know that she was able to shoot photos the same way people did decades ago.

“For a photographer traveling is very significant,” Bravo said. “To be able to travel through time is beyond words.”

 

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‘Dangerous’ Elmhurst intersection to get crossing guard


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photo by Angy Altamirano

Pedestrians and school children will soon be able to safely cross a busy Elmhurst intersection.

Last year, state Sen. Jose Peralta called on the Department of Transportation to study the intersection of Junction Boulevard and the Horace Harding Expressway and restore a school crossing guard to ensure the safety of pedestrians, especially school children, who cross the “dangerous” thoroughfare.

P.S. 206, located at 61-02 98th St., is near the heavily trafficked area. Students cross the intersection on their way between home and school every day.

“The children and the parents are in great danger each time they navigate this intersection because the drivers do not drive with care or follow traffic regulations,” P.S. 206 Principal Joan Thomas wrote in February, requesting to bring back a school crossing guard. “In addition, we have had some instances in which some of our walkers have been harassed on their way to school in the morning and there is no adult present who can assist them.”

The 110th and 112th Precincts had previously told Peralta that a crossing guard was that assigned to the area because  guards are stationed at other nearby intersections.

Now, after Peralta renewed the call for a crossing guard once Vision Zero was implemented, he has learned that the 112th Precinct will assign a crossing guard to P.S. 206 in the upcoming months.

“This is a very dangerous intersection for children and there’s simply no substitute for the direct, hands-on traffic control and help that a crossing guard provides to kids,” Peralta said. ”Thankfully, a crossing guard will finally be reinstated there.”

 

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