Tag Archives: Queens

Identify this place in Queens


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

IDENTIFY

Do you know where in Queens this photo was taken? Guess by commenting below! The answer will be revealed next week.

Last week’s answer to “Identify this Place”: Northern Boulevard at Bell Boulevard in Bayside 

IDENTIFY-624x511

Identify this place in Queens


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

IDENTIFY

Do you know where in Queens this photo was taken? Guess by commenting below! The answer will be revealed next week.

Last week’s answer to “Identify this Place”: 30th Avenue N train stop in Astoria

WHERE-624x425

 

 

Identify this place in Queens


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

WHERE

Do you know where in Queens this photo was taken? Guess by commenting below! The answer will be revealed next week.

Last week’s answer to “Identify this Place”: St. John’s Episcopal Hospital

WHERE-624x517

First Miss Queens Pageant to be held in Long Island City


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Angy Altamirano

Next year Miss America might be from Queens.

For the first time, the borough will have an official Miss America preliminary competition, called the Miss Queens Pageant, held on Oct. 12 at RESOBOX located at 41-26 27th St. in Long Island City.

The inaugural event, presented by the Miss Queens Scholarship Organization, is open to women, between 17 and 24 years old, who live, work or go to college in Queens and Long Island. The winner of the pageant will go on to compete for the title of Miss New York in spring 2015.

The pageant is divided into talent, interview, onstage and swimsuit/fitness portions. Potential contestants still have until Sept. 30 to sign up for the pageant.

“It’s something that the community really wanted,” said Shekinah Monee, executive director of the Miss Queens Scholarship Organization. “To have a borough that never had their own pageant, it was important to bring that to them, to let them have that sense of pride as well.”

Through the pageant, the newly formed Miss Queens Scholarship Organization will award scholarships to the women for undergraduate and graduate school, a tradition first started by the Miss America Organization, according to Monee.

As part of qualifying as a contestant, each young woman must raise at least $100 for the Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals, which are dedicated to raising funds and awareness to help enhance medical facilities and health care for sick and injured children.

Tickets for the Miss Queens Pageant are $15 prior to the show and $18 at the door.

For more information visit www.missqueensorg.wix.com/missqueensorg.

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Top 10 places to watch football in Queens


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File photo

BY ECLEEN CARABALLO, ASHA MAHADEVAN AND CRISTABELLE TUMOLA

If you grow tired of watching the football games from your couch this season, there are plenty of bars in Queens that offer bigger TVs, fellow fans and an array of drink and beer specials to accompany the touchdowns.

Austin’s Steak and Ale House
82-70 Austin St., Kew Gardens
718-849-3939
austinsteakandalehouse.com

Photo courtesy of Austin's Ale House

Photo courtesy of Austin’s Ale House

Austin’s Ale House will be screening all of the games this football season on their 50-odd TV screens. In one of the rooms, they have TVs at the table. There is a 30-cent wing special all day on Sundays. Customers can also enjoy a Sunday brunch for $16.95 while watching the games, as well as 20 beers on draft and 50 beers in bottles.

Bar43
43-06 43rd St., Sunnyside
718-361-3090
bar43.com

For one, it has a sports bar with 10 TVs. Bar43 shows the games on all the days, and is offering specials on a mango fuel cocktail ($5) and high-water melon beer ($4).

Bohemian Hall and Beer Garden
29-19 24th Ave., Astoria
718-274-4925
bohemianhall.com

Bohemian Hall 3

Photo courtesy of Bohemian Hall and Beer Garden

There is happy hour between 5 and 7 p.m. every day, during which there are $4 mugs of craft beer. You can watch football games on the TV sets installed all over the garden. Sounds perfect? Ah, there is a catch. Bohemian Hall won’t have every game on, just the ones that are on local channels or ESPN.

Break Bar and Billiards
32-04b Broadway, Astoria
718-777-5400
break-ny.com

Photo courtesy of Break Bar and Billiards

Photo courtesy of Break Bar and Billiards

Break Bar and Billiards is showing all the games on 16 big-screen TVs and one 105-inch projector. Specials during the games are wings for $4.50 and beer towers (100 oz.) for $20. Happy hour is seven days a week, even when there is no game on.

Buffalo Wild Wings
107-16 71st Ave., Forest Hills
718-544-9453
buffalowildwings.com

Manager George Criskos of the Buffalo Wild Wings in Forest Hills claims that it has the best chicken wings. But he says that’s only the beginning. With 95 televisions and two 14-foot projectors, you can watch the game from every angle and drink one of its 30 draft beers or 26 bottled beers while you’re at it.

Hooters of Fresh Meadows
61-09 190th St., Fresh Meadows
718-454-2800
facebook.com/hootersoffreshmeadows

THE COURIER/File photo

THE COURIER/File photo

As football season kicks off, the manager prepares by filling Hooters with jerseys that the restaurant will be giving away. The team at Hooters believes its locale is the best place to go during football season because it roots for every team, and gives back to those who come visit with prizes from jerseys to tickets to games.

Katch Astoria
31-19 Newtown Ave., Astoria
718-777-2230
katchastoria.com

Photo courtesy of Katch Brewery & Grill

Photo courtesy of Katch Brewery & Grill

Tino Tsutras, general manager, describes Katch Astoria, as a “sports capable bar,” with its 63 TVs, 50 craft beers on tap and entirely handmade menu created from nothing frozen. During Sunday and Monday football there are 60-cent wing and $5 Brooklyn Brewery beer specials. Thursday is ladies’ night, with 50 percent off on sangria, house liquor, wine and Prosecco. Katch has every sporting event offered by satellite TV.

Miller’s Ale House at Rego Park
61-35 Junction Blvd., Rego Park
718-760-1090
millersalehouse.com

Photo courtesy of millersalehouse.com

Photo courtesy of millersalehouse.com

Miller’s Ale House has 70 TVs showing the games through 20 separate satellites. No blackouts, it says. You can watch every single game on Mondays, Thursdays and Sundays. It has bucket specials (5 for $10), bottle specials (a pint of Bud Light for $2.75 and pitchers of Corona Light for $7) and food specials.

O’Neill’s Maspeth
64-21 53rd Dr., Maspeth
718-672-9696
oneillsmaspeth.com

THE COURIER/File photo

THE COURIER/File photo

With more than 50 TVs and surround sound, O’Neill’s wants to make you feel like you are at the game. Every day during football season, it’s offering $3 pints and $12 pitchers of Coors Light, Miller Lite and Pabst Blue Ribbon, $4 pints and $14 pitchers of Corona Light, and $3 sangria. On Mondays, Thursdays and Sundays there are Coors Light beer tubes with 10 wings of your choice for $25 as well as 5 for $15 Coors Light buckets and 5 for $20 Corona buckets. Thursday is ladies’ night with buy-one-get-one-free well drinks. On select weeks, Miller Lite, Coors Light and Corona reps come in and hold giveaways and raffles during the games. Grill rooms have personal TVs at each booth, and there are projectors in each of the catering rooms for private parties.

The Garden at Studio Square NYC
35-33 36th St., Astoria
718-383-1001
www.studiosquarebeergarden.com

File photo

File photo

The Garden is known for its 9-by-16-foot high definition video wall and its space, which fits more than 2,000 people in the garden. Chief Marketing Officer Pete Mason also proudly mentioned that it won “the ESPN ultimate sports bar challenge in NY for 2014,” and that “if you can’t be there at the stadium, this is the next best thing.”

What are your favorite places to watch football in Queens? Let us know by commenting below.

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House bill looks at Flushing’s connection to religious freedom


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

File Photo

There’s more than just tennis and the World’s Fair in Queens. U.S. Rep. Grace Meng wants to add the roots of American religious freedom to Queens’ list of accomplishments.

A bill, sponsored by Meng, would require the government to look into funding Flushing sites like the Bowne House and Quaker Meetinghouse, according to the Library of Congress. These sites are associated with the 1657 signing of the Flushing Remonstrance, the document recognized as the forerunner of religious freedom in America.

Her bill won a majority in the House of Representatives on Monday night.

“The passage of this legislation brings us one step closer towards many more Americans learning about the important role that Queens played in the history of religious freedom in America,” Meng said.

If the bill passes the Senate and is signed by President Barack Obama, the Flushing sites would receive federal funding and, according to Meng, result in increased tourism.

“Not only would the two facilities become more well-known, but the sites would stand to receive many more visitors each year, and more tourism translates into more dollars for the Queens economy,” she said. “It’s time for more people across the country to know about the Flushing Remonstrance, and putting these sites on a national stage is a sure way to accomplish that.”

Rosemary Vietor, vice president of the Bowne House Historical Society, was “thrilled” to hear the news and said that the study would help lift the Flushing Remonstrance signing out of obscurity.

“The 1657 Remonstrance triggered events which established the principle of religious freedom in the colony of New Amsterdam,” she said, “which led to the guarantee of religious freedom in the First Amendment more than 100 years later.”

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West Nile spraying scheduled for parts of Queens this week


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYC Department of Health

On Tuesday, Sept. 16, there will be West Nile spraying in parts of Queens, including along the Brooklyn-Queens border, to help reduce the mosquito population and the risk of the disease.

The spraying will take place between the hours of 8:00 p.m. and 6 a.m. the next morning. In case of bad weather, the application will be delayed until Wednesday, Sept. 17 during the same hours.

The following neighborhoods are being treated due to rising West Nile virus activity with high mosquito populations, according to the city’s Health Department:

Parts of City Line, Cypress Hills, Highland Park, Howard Beach, Lindenwood, Ozone Park, Spring Creek and Woodhaven (Bordered by Jamaica Avenue and to the north; Shepherd Avenue, Fulton Street Line and Fountain Avenue to the west; Jamaica Bay to the south; and Rockaway Rail-Line, Rockaway Boulevard and Woodhaven Boulevard to the east).

For the application, the Health Department will spray pesticide from trucks and use a very low concentration of Anvil®, 10 + 10, a synthetic pesticide. When properly used, this product poses no significant risks to human health.

The Health Department recommends that people take the following precautions to minimize direct exposure:

  • Whenever possible, stay indoors during spraying. People with asthma or other respiratory conditions  are encouraged to stay inside during spraying since direct exposure could worsen these conditions.
  • Air conditioners may remain on, however, if you wish to reduce the possibility of indoor exposure to pesticides, set the air conditioner vent to the closed position, or choose the re-circulate function.
  •  Remove children’s toys, outdoor equipment, and clothes from outdoor areas during spraying. If  outdoor equipment and toys are exposed to pesticides, wash them with soap and water before using  again.
  • Wash skin and clothing exposed to pesticides with soap and water. Always wash your produce thoroughly with water before cooking or eating.

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What to do this weekend in Queens


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Mayo Arts

Saturday, Sept. 13

Walk, dance and bike along the boardwalk at the Rockaway Bike Parade. This year’s theme is the West Indian Carnival, so bring a colorful costume and steel pan drum. The parade departs from Firehouse 59 to Beach 17 at 11 a.m. Advanced registration is required.

Join Genesis Tree of Life for a monthly spiritual evening of lively discussion, singing, meditation, sharing of vegan food and socializing at the end of the evening. The event is from 8 to 10:30 p.m. and the fee to enter is a donation of $5 to $10 and a vegan drink or food for the group to share. RSVP on www.meetup.com or call 718-544-5997.  Also, call them if you do not know what to bring. The Yoga and Wellness Center is located on the lower level of 102-02/06 Metropolitan Ave.

Autumn leaves mean it’s time for fall fun. Young gardeners in weekend sessions plant cool-season vegetables, explore Queens Botanical Garden’s Herb and Bee Gardens, and cook with just-harvested produce. Ages 5 through 12 are invited to participate. The event is from 2 to 4 p.m. Visit www.queensbotanical.org/programs/childrensgarden for more information and to register.

The Richmond Hill Block Association’s 41st Annual Park Fair will be held today from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., rain or shine. There will be food, rides, games, music, raffles and vendors at Forest Park located at Myrtle Avenue and Park Lane South. For more information and applications please call 718-849-3759 or email RHBA@att.net.

Attend Oktoberfest at Poppenhusen Institute from noon to 6 p.m. There will be German singers and dancers from 1 to 4 p.m. and tournaments, games and a beer stein holding contest. Face painting and caricatures will be featured and refreshments will be sold. German-American food, beer, wine, soft beverages, apple strudel and black forest cake will be served. Admission is $15 and free for kids 5 and under. Oktoberfest is held at 114-04 14th Rd. Contact poppenhusen@juno.com or 718-358-0067 for more information.

A New York Council for the Humanities Community Conversations for Kids Workshop is coming to the Queens Historical Society from 1 to 2 p.m. Karyn Balan will be guiding the children and their family members through Jeanette Winter’s book, “September Roses,” and will be followed by a discussion and activity. This event is free for children and their adult companions. The society is located at 143-35 37th Ave. For more information call 718-939-0647, ext. 17.

Come join the fun at Socrates Sculpture Park with Circus Amok from 1 to 6 p.m. Admission is free and is open to audiences of all ages. Circus Amok blends traditional circus skills – tight rope walking, juggling, acrobatics, stilt walking and clowning – with experimental dance, puppetry and more. The park is located at 32-01 Vernon Blvd.

The Queens Botanical Garden’s lawn care expert will take you through the basics of how to care for your lawn in the fall. The session will show you how to see to it that your lawn stays healthy without using artificial fertilizers and pesticides. The three-hour-long workshop begins at 10 a.m. and costs $5. Email compost@queensbotanical.org or call 718-539-5296 to register for the workshop. The garden is located at 43-50 Main St.

State Senator Joseph Addabbo Jr. will host a mobile van outside of his Middle Village office at 66-85 73rd Pl. from 10 a.m. to noon, where representatives from the Integrated Medical Foundation will provide no-cost prostate cancer screenings. The screening is open to men ages 40 and older who have not been previously treated for prostate cancer, regardless of whether or not they have insurance. Patients should bring photo ID, a stamped, self-addressed envelope and their physician’s name and address. Appointments are recommended, walk-ins welcome. Call 718-738-1111 for more information or to make an appointment.

Explore the natural forests amid the concrete jungle from 10 a.m. to noon at Forest Park. The Natural Areas Conservancy is organizing walks through the trails of Forest Park as part of its Explore NYC’s Natural Side series. The two-hour walk is free. Please be prepared with walking shoes and water. The park is located at Park Lane South and Myrtle Avenue.

Sunday, Sept. 14

Prevent identity theft! Come join the NYPD’s Crime Prevention Section to shred your documents containing your personal/sensitive information. This is a free service. You can also register your electronic devices with the NYPD’s Operation ID Program. The event will be held at Waldbaum’s Supermarket’s parking lot at 156-01 Cross Bay Blvd. from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

From apiary tours to beekeeping lessons to honey tastings to a cooking class to a kiddie costume-making session to the Be-A-Bee Parade, there’s something for everyone at NY Honey Week. The event runs from 11 a.m. to sunset and is free. The location is at Rockaway Beach 97, 97th and Ocean.

The 34th Annual Antique Motorcycle Show will take place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Queens County Farm Museum at 73-50 Little Neck Parkway. The event will showcase motorcycles of various makes and models that have been out of production for 10 years or longer. There will also be music, hayrides, farmhouse tours and food. Admission costs $5 per person and or free with farm membership.

Mets game attendees at the 8th Annual Stitch N’ Pitch will enjoy discounted seats in the Left Field Landing and an opportunity to stitch 7-by-9-inch squares to benefit Warm Up America. Admission is $30 and the event is located at Citi Field at 123-01 Roosevelt Ave.

Tony and Olivier Award winner Patti LuPone in her new concert “Coulda, Woulda, Shoulda…played that part” performs songs from musicals that she could have played, should have played, did play and will play. Musicals include “Hair,” “Bye Bye Birdie,” “Funny Girl,” “West Side Story,” “Peter Pan” and her Tony Award-winning performances in “Evita” and “Gypsy.” Orchestra seats are $65 and rear orchestra/mezzanine seats are $55. The concert is located at the Queensborough Performing Arts Center at 222-05 56th Ave.

Saturdays and Sundays

The popular Long Island City flea market LIC Flea & Food  is opened on weekends at the outdoor lot by the waterfront at the corner of 5th Street and 46th Avenue from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Items for sale at the market include food and drinks, collectibles, antiques, arts and crafts, fashion and more. This Saturday, the market will debut the LIC Flea Beer Garden with outdoor seating set up along the basin in the back of the market with views of the Manhattan skyline. Only artisanal beer made by Queens breweries will be served, along with wine.

Through Nov. 1

The Queens Botanical Garden is hosting an exhibit about its past and explains the impact that the 1939 and 1964 New York World’s Fairs left on the garden. The exhibit includes material from the garden’s archives and includes photographs from that era. It is open to the public from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the Visitor and Administration Building Gallery at 43-50 Main St. through Nov. 1. A multimedia exhibit about the World’s Fairs, which focuses on the Port Authority’s role in bringing trade to the city, is on view at the auditorium lobby. Entry for both is included in the garden admission.

Identify this place in Queens


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

where

Do you know where in Queens this photo was taken? Guess by commenting below! The answer will be revealed next week.

Last week’s answer to “Identify this Place”: Pier 1 at Gantry Plaza State Park in Long Island CIty

DSC_0441-624x473

Queens pols remember 9/11 during 13th anniversary


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo via Twitter/@TonyAvella

BY ASHA MAHADEVAN

Queens marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks across the borough on Thursday.

State Sen.Tony Avella, fresh off his victory in the primary, joined the 109th Precinct at the 9/11 Park Dedication ceremony in the morning to honor the lives lost 13 years ago. After the ceremony, he embarked on his annual motorcade, visiting the streets in his district which have been renamed after those who died that day. He hung wreaths on the poles of 26 streets that bear the names of the fallen.

Paul Vallone, councilman for Bayside, Whitestone, Auburndale, College Point, Little Neck, Douglaston, and North Flushing, observed the 9/11 anniversary with students at P.S.169 and Bell Academy

Assemblywoman Nily Rozic attended the remembrance ceremony at Queens College. The ceremony honored alum Mohammad Salman Hamdani, who died on 9/11, but was falsely implicated as a terrorist.

Rozic is expected to also attend the candlelight vigil at 7 p.m. in Bayside Hills

U.S. Rep. Joe Crowley released a statement in which he said that every detail of that day is etched in our collective memories.

“But just as vivid are the memories of all those we lost – mothers, fathers, children, friends, and complete strangers whom we, as a nation, grieved for as if they were family,” he said. These memories make today “a bit more manageable” and we should “honor our service members who continue to protect our nation.”

New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman stated that “we continue to feel the ache of such a swift and immeasurable loss” but while we mourn the dead, “an attack meant to shatter us instead brought out the great hope and resilience within all New Yorkers and all Americans” and on this day, we should “recommit to our work toward a more secure future.”

State Sen. Joseph P. Addabbo, Jr. called upon the people to not only remember the first responders and uniformed personnel in the city but to also “support our military who remain vigilant in the fight against the evil and hatred of terrorists.”

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Raccoons to be vaccinated in Queens, Brooklyn to help prevent rabies


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of NYC Health Department

BY ECLEEN CARABALLO

Wildlife biologists will distribute oral rabies vaccine in parts of Queens and Brooklyn this month to help prevent the spread of the virus among raccoons, according to the city’s Health Department.

The Health Department decided to take action after the continuing identification of raccoons and other animals with rabies in all five boroughs of New York City. Specifically, two cases of infected raccoons arose in Brooklyn this year. The most recent reported cases in Queens were a raccoon and opossum in 2010. In New York City and New York State, rabies occurs primarily in raccoons, skunks, bats and skunks.

The Health Department, and wildlife biologists with the United States Department of Agriculture and Cornell University are hoping the vaccine distribution will decrease those numbers. Cornell received state funding to pursue this program in New York City and it is an expansion of a program being conducted in Long Island and parts of upstate New York.

When brought to Queens and south Brooklyn, fixed bait stations will be placed in several wooded areas, parks, public green spaces, and even private properties with the owner’s permission.

rabies-vaccine

The vaccination being distributed is specifically for raccoons, and it will help to further limit the spread of rabies to other animals, including pets. Although it is not harmful to pets, and will not cause rabies, it can cause vomiting if several baits are consumed. In the case that pets do find it, do not try to take it away from them to avoid being bitten and exposed to the vaccine.

The bait itself will not harm people. But in rare instances, exposure to the liquid can cause a rash. In the unlikely event someone comes in contact with the liquid, wash his or her hands with warm, soapy water, talk to a doctor, and notify the Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222.

For the raccoons, vaccinating them is harmless, and is used in many other U.S. locations.

Rabies, a viral disease that infects the central nervous system of mammals, can be fatal to humans unless treatment is administered soon after exposure.

There have been no human cases of rabies in New York City for more than 50 years.

 

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Malba defends its smell


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Eric Jankiewicz

Malba residents say something stinks about a recent website ranking that named their affluent neighborhood as the smelliest in Queens.

New York City real estate website BrickUnderground and apartment data site AddressReport compiled the list, which rated the 10 smelliest and 10 least smelly neighborhoods in Queens, Brooklyn and Manhattan. The ranking used data from the frequency of 311 complaints for odor-related issues, such as missed trash collection, sewer backups and odors, vehicle and restaurant fumes, and dirty sidewalks and alleyways. The data was then weighted for each area’s population.

Malba was not only rated as Queens’ smelliest neighborhood, but also as the third smelliest in the three boroughs.

Malba locals had issues with the analysis, saying that the neighborhood, a section of northeast Queens with multi-million dollar houses and expansive water views, was clean, well-maintained and virtually odor-free.

“As a lifelong resident of Malba, I find this [ranking] highly insulting,” said Christopher Biancaniello, who likened the area to Beverly Hills.

“All of us homeowners take pride in our properties,” he added.

On a hot Friday afternoon last week, Steven Vitale, 24, who has also lived in the neighborhood his whole life, made an observation about the smell in the neighborhood.

“The smelliest thing here is me,” the jogger said, shirt soaked in sweat. “Otherwise, this area smells fine to me.”

Eliza Kalas, who has lived in Malba for the last five years, agreed.

“It’s not that bad here and it’s certainly not worth complaining about,” she said, referring to the 311 complaints. The only area she noticed with a slight smell was by the water on Boulevard Street.

USE

Other Queens neighborhoods on the smelliest list included Lindenwood, which came in at number two in the borough, followed by Neponsit, St. Albans, College Point, Howard Beach, Bayswater, Cambria Heights, Broad Channel and Beechurst/Whitestone.

Queens’ least smelly neighborhoods included North Corona, at number one, followed by Corona, Woodside and Elmhurst, Rego Park, Sunnyside, Jackson Heights, Bellerose, East Flushing and Ridgewood.

Nicholas Kaizer, vice president of the Malba Association, found issue with how the data was analyzed since, according to him, there are only around 400 homes in the area.

“Though not a statistician, it’s pretty obvious that the tiny size of the sample population seriously calls into question the value of the per capita method of analyzing odor complaints to the city,” he said, calling the data skewed.

“The sounds and smells coming off of our waterfront — and throughout our small neighborhood — are among our greatest assets and we jealously guard our native habitat, policing and tending to the grounds regularly, as our community has done for over 100 years,” Kaizer said.

-With additional reporting by Eric Jankiewicz

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