Tag Archives: Queens Schools

Class in session: City to get 54 new schools, two in Queens


| mpantelidis@queenscourier.com

Spring may signify new beginnings, but schools will be “bloom”ing this fall.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg joined Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott on April 17 to announce the opening of 54 new schools across the city for the 2012-2013 school year. The new schools – 30 of which will be run by the district, along with 24 charters – will serve more than 7,000 students from kindergarten through high school next year, and over 21,000 kids when they grow to full size.

Of the 54 schools, two will be in Queens – Wave Preparatory School, an elementary school in District 27, will replace P.S. 215 Lucretia Mott, located at 535 Briar Place in Far Rockaway, and Central Queens Academy Charter School will open in District 24.

Including those slated to open this fall, 589 new schools have now been created in the five boroughs since 2002.

“Our children deserve great schools, our parents deserve great options, and our administration is committed to delivering them to families in every neighborhood in the five boroughs,” Bloomberg said. “The 54 new schools that will open next year reflect our commitment to children and parents, and they will build on the successful records established by the hundreds of new small schools we have already created. These new schools, including our new Academy for Software Engineering, which will train students not just in the language of computers but also in the language of innovation, will help prepare our students to succeed in the new global economy.”

According to the mayor’s office, evidence has indicated that new schools rank higher on parent satisfaction surveys than other schools across the city and perform better on state math and reading exams and graduate students at considerably higher rates than schools they replace. New schools also serve similar percentages of black and Latino students, English language learners and students with disabilities compared to the schools they replace.

Many of the new schools opened during the Bloomberg administration have followed the model of smaller schools – a strategy MDRC, a nonpartisan education and social policy research group, says “markedly improves graduation rates for a large population of low-income, disadvantaged students of color.”

“As we’ve seen over the past decade, new schools have changed thousands of lives in New York City for the better, helping more students graduate and prepare for college and careers,” Walcott said. “I want to thank all 54 new school principals, who have taken the bold step of building a new school community and offering families high quality options. Every child and every neighborhood deserve a great school, and we are proud to continue a strategy that has delivered just that for the past 10 years.”

Queens schools get great report card


| rcasiano@queenscourier.com

Students in Queens may have a leg up when it comes to learning.

According to a progress report by the Department of Education (DOE), public schools in Queens were ranked the best in the city.

Queens had the highest percentage of schools in New York that received an “A” in the 2011 progress reports released by the DOE. The best performing school district in the city was also in Queens, the report found.

The annual progress reports award public schools letter grades from “A” to “F” based on student progress and performance, attendance and school environment. They also take into account academic progress made with students with disabilities and, new this year, the progress of black and Latino male students.

Out of the 253 schools in Queens serving grades K-8, 34 percent got an “A.” That is higher than all the other boroughs and closest to Manhattan, which had 30 percent of their K-8 schools get an “A.” District 26, which serves northeast Queens, was the best performing district academically, according to the report.

Still, not all schools in Queens were winners.

P.S. 215 in Far Rockaway, P.S. 80 in Jamaica and P.S. 182, also in Jamaica, were among the 13 schools in the borough that received grades of “C”s, “D”s, or “F”s.

For the schools that did fare well however, there was a lot to celebrate.

Phyllis Leinwand is the principal at P.S. 66 in Richmond Hill, one of the highest performing public schools in Queens, according to the report. Leinwand attributes the school’s success to their connections with parents, individualized instruction and working with students in groups.

“Small is the key,” said Leinwand, who has led the school for 11 years and was happy with the good news. “I am very proud of the results. They reflect the hard work of teachers, parents, children and the school community.”

The school grades only include elementary and middle public schools. Public high schools get their separate progress reports at the end of October, according to a spokesman for the DOE.

Graphic:

Top Schools Grades

P.S. 66 in Richmond Hill…………………..A

P.S. 254 in Richmond Hill……………….A

Worst Schools:

P.S. 215 in Far Rockaway…………………F

P.S. 80 in Jamaica………………………………F