Tag Archives: Queens Blvd

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| lguerre@queenscourier.com


State Supreme Court Judge Claims NYPD Officer Attacked Him

A State Supreme Court Judge claims that he was attacked by a police officer in Queens Friday night. Thomas Raffaele said he saw a scuffle between two police officers and another man handcuffed on the ground Friday night. Read more: [NY1]

Queens Women On Alert As NYPD Seeks Suspect In Violent Sex Attacks

Police are asking for the public’s help in finding a suspect wanted for sexual abuse, rape and robbery — all in the Forest Hills section of Queens.  The news has women in the neighborhood on alert. Read more: [1010WINS]

Queens bar installs regulation size basketball half-court 

A Forest Hills watering hole is giving new meaning to the term sports bar. Cobblestones Pub on Queens Blvd. has created a regulation-size half basketball court behind their establishment, raising the bar for what is considered a traditional parlor game. Read more: [New York Daily News]

Woman with blood disorder meets blood donor for first time 

When 37-year-old Radhika Sawh finally met one of the hundreds of anonymous donors who keep her alive, she shed tears for those who had shed blood for her. Read more: [New York Daily News]  

Belmont Stakes Favorite Draws 11th Spot; Strike Threat Averted

There was a gasp among some, but I’ll Have Another’s trainer, Doug O’Neill, seemed happy with the horse’s post position for the Belmont Stakes. I’ll Have Another was on the outside for the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness. So will a third outside position at post 11 be the key to the 12th Triple Crown racing history? Read more: [NY1]

Queens rivals for Congress duke it out for credit 

The only thing harder than getting something done in Albany is getting credit for it. So after New York State succeeded in making millionaires pay more in taxes, Assemblywoman Grace Meng’s supporters were furious when her rival in the race for Congress, Assemblyman Rory Lancman, sent out a mailing claiming he was “the only one who fought for the Millionaire’s Tax in the Assembly so the ultra-wealthy pay their fair share.” Read more: [New York Daily News]

Red Storm Baseball Prepares For Super Regionals

The St. John’s Red Storm baseball team is preparing for a date in the NCAA Super Regionals against Arizona. Watch video: [NY1]

New parking regulations to help businesses


| mpantelidis@queenscourier.com


Commuters utilizing the muni-meter lots on Queens Boulevard in Sunnyside are having their parking plans curbed by the Department of Transportation (DOT).

Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer joined DOT Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan and other local elected officials on September 29 to announce that 60 muni-meter parking spaces on Queens Boulevard and 40th Street underneath the No. 7 train will be converted to a four-hour maximum time limit next month.

In addition, the weekday “No Standing 7 a.m. to 10 a.m.” regulation on the north curb of westbound Queens Boulevard from 48th Street to 32nd Place will be removed, and two-hour muni-meter regulations will be installed. Street cleaning will also be in effect daily between 7:30 and 8 a.m.

Community leaders hope that the adjusted parking regulations, which begin on October 31, will make the area more accessible to motorists, particularly those looking to visit the neighborhood’s businesses. Among the intended benefits is the prevention of commuters leaving their cars in the lots prior to using the train to travel to their jobs in Manhattan.
“We live here, we shop here and we want to support our local neighborhood,” said Van Bramer. “We also want to make sure that there is sufficient turnover to allow more people to access the services on Queens Boulevard. If we limit so much parking to commuters who are coming very early, getting off the 7 train after work, getting in their cars and heading back east, then that is not benefitting our neighborhood.”

Before making the alterations, the DOT evaluated the traffic conditions on Queens Boulevard during the morning peak hours, and determined that the changes would create a better balance between short and long-term parking availability in the area.

“Sunnyside is more than a stop along the No. 7 train, it’s a destination for shoppers that local retailers depend on,” said Sadik-Khan. “By expanding short-term parking, we’re balancing the needs of commuters while providing access that will help boost the local economy.”
Stores in the area are excited about the potential surge in business that could come from having their shops more accessible to customers.

“The people who park here for 12 hours are the people who go to the city,” said Giovanni Brione, manager of Oasis Pizzeria, which is located across from a parking lot. “They shop and eat in the city, come back here and then go back to the island. If we have more space available for parking, then more people will come here to shop. Many times people don’t want to come around here because there is no parking. This change will help the businesses.”
Despite claims that the adjustments were requested and are heralded by Sunnyside residents, some believe the changes are less about improving parking flow and more about increasing cash flow to the city.

“I can’t believe the city is doing this,” said Adrian Ionas, a resident of Sunnyside. “This is not going to be an improvement for the people parking here. The city is just looking to make more money.”

New parking regulations to help businesses


| mpantelidis@queenscourier.com

doc4e8c73cc822b3081198902

Commuters utilizing the muni-meter lots on Queens Boulevard in Sunnyside are having their parking plans curbed by the Department of Transportation (DOT).

Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer joined DOT Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan and other local elected officials on September 29 to announce that 60 muni-meter parking spaces on Queens Boulevard and 40th Street underneath the No. 7 train will be converted to a four-hour maximum time limit next month.

In addition, the weekday “No Standing 7 a.m. to 10 a.m.” regulation on the north curb of westbound Queens Boulevard from 48th Street to 32nd Place will be removed, and two-hour muni-meter regulations will be installed. Street cleaning will also be in effect daily between 7:30 and 8 a.m.

Community leaders hope that the adjusted parking regulations, which begin on October 31, will make the area more accessible to motorists, particularly those looking to visit the neighborhood’s businesses. Among the intended benefits is the prevention of commuters leaving their cars in the lots prior to using the train to travel to their jobs in Manhattan.

“We live here, we shop here and we want to support our local neighborhood,” said Van Bramer. “We also want to make sure that there is sufficient turnover to allow more people to access the services on Queens Boulevard. If we limit so much parking to commuters who are coming very early, getting off the 7 train after work, getting in their cars and heading back east, then that is not benefitting our neighborhood.”

Before making the alterations, the DOT evaluated the traffic conditions on Queens Boulevard during the morning peak hours, and determined that the changes would create a better balance between short and long-term parking availability in the area.

“Sunnyside is more than a stop along the No. 7 train, it’s a destination for shoppers that local retailers depend on,” said Sadik-Khan. “By expanding short-term parking, we’re balancing the needs of commuters while providing access that will help boost the local economy.”

Stores in the area are excited about the potential surge in business that could come from having their shops more accessible to customers.

“The people who park here for 12 hours are the people who go to the city,” said Giovanni Brione, manager of Oasis Pizzeria, which is located across from a parking lot. “They shop and eat in the city, come back here and then go back to the island. If we have more space available for parking, then more people will come here to shop. Many times people don’t want to come around here because there is no parking. This change will help the businesses.”

Despite claims that the adjustments were requested and are heralded by Sunnyside residents, some believe the changes are less about improving parking flow and more about increasing cash flow to the city.

“I can’t believe the city is doing this,” said Adrian Ionas, a resident of Sunnyside. “This is not going to be an improvement for the people parking here. The city is just looking to make more money.”