Tag Archives: Q train

Man wanted for exposing himself while riding subway in Astoria

| asuriel@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of the NYPD

Police are asking the public for assistance in identifying a suspect wanted for exposing himself on a Q train in Astoria earlier this week.

On Sept. 21 at about 12:57 p.m, a 27-year-old female riding on a Ditmars Boulevard-bound train, in the vicinity of 31st Street and 30th Avenue, saw the suspect exposing his penis and engaging in a lewd act, according to cops.

The perpetrator is described as a white male in his 30s with brown eyes and black hair, standing between 5 foot 5 and 5 foot 8 inches tall.

He was last seen wearing a red, short-sleeved T-shirt with a black design on the front, black shorts and white, orange and gray sneakers.

Anyone with information in regards to this incident is asked to call the NYPD’s Crime Stoppers Hotline at 800-577-TIPS. The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or texting their tips to 274637(CRIMES) then enter TIP577.


Queens N, Q and 7 train riders share ‘subway horror stories’

| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Riders Alliance

Subway riders were given a platform Tuesday morning — the N, Q and 7 train platform to be exact — to share their angst of trying to catch a train in New York City.

As part of a weeklong citywide initiative to collect subway riders’ “horror stories,” the organization Riders Alliance, dedicated to winning better transit, gathered at the Queensboro Plaza subway station Tuesday morning to get riders of the N, Q and 7 trains to share their tales.

The decision to collect these stories arises after a drastic increase in complaints from Riders Alliance members. The complaints include signal malfunctions, unexplained train delays and general “deteriorating service” in the past weeks, according to Riders Alliance.

“Our transit system is better in every way than it was in the 1980s, but if we don’t invest the funds to maintain it, we’ll see the bad old days come back,” said John Raskin, executive director of the Riders Alliance.

On Tuesday, riders were asked by Riders Alliance members to share their experiences and write them on a piece of paper provided of the organization that read, “My subway horror story is…”

“I rely on the 7 train to get me from Queens to work in the Upper West Side. But lately, weekend and late night service on the 7 train has been a joke,” said Carol Crump, a Rider Alliance member, who added that at times, she has to resort to taking a bus or car service. “We need a well-funded capital plan that will provide the money for countdown clocks, service announcements and faster trains.”

The stories, which can also be submitted online at www.ridersny.org/horror-stories, will be compiled and later presented to Governor Andrew Cuomo and different members of the state legislature.

In the upcoming months, a decision will have to be made whether or not to fund the MTA’s proposed over-$30 billion 2015-2019 capital plan.

“Signal problems have stranded me at night several times in the past year on the N/Q,” said Emily Hultman, another Riders Alliance member. “It isn’t safe to be kicked off a train to fend for yourself in a deserted part of town at night, especially when the only options to complete the trip are buses that run twice an hour or less. I pay my MTA fee to get all the way home, safely.”


New legislation to protect Astoria school from ‘disruptive’ subway noise

| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photos by Angy Altamirano

Members of one Astoria school, located about 50 feet away from a subway platform, are hoping a new proposed bill will help bring “peaceful learning.”

The community at P.S. 85 is met daily with noise problems caused by the N and Q elevated subway line, which shakes windows and disrupts lessons, according to parents and teachers. 

Looking to bring a stop to the noise pollution, U.S. Rep. Joseph Crowley announced on Monday the Peaceful Learning Act of 2014, new legislation that would require the formation of a program to lessen railway noise levels that “negatively impact” public schools in the city. 

“As another school year begins, it is unconscionable that so many children whose schools are located near elevated trains are forced to learn under these adverse conditions,” said Crowley. “If we are serious about helping our children reach their full potential, providing an adequate and peaceful learning environment is priority number one.” 

During the morning announcement, speakers were interrupted by trains passing by in front of the school. Teachers, parents and elected officials held up two fingers, a gesture used daily to pause school lectures every time a train passes.

During rush hour trains pass by every two minutes and during normal hours, every five minutes, according to officials.

The proposed federal bill will direct the National Academy of Sciences to conduct a study on the impact of the subway noise on schools, determine acceptable ideas and evaluate the usefulness of noise reduction programs, according to the congressman.

Then schools that would be considered subject to unacceptable noise levels will be qualified to receive a grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation, together with local matching funds, to build barriers or acoustical shielding to soundproof the sites.

Last December, the P.S. 85 community and elected officials rallied to call on the MTA and Department of Education to help alleviate the noise problems.

“This cannot go on any longer. This school has been here for over a hundred years, trains came after, and the school has adjusted,” said Evie Hantzopoulos, vice president of the parent association at P.S. 85. “Our kids go with it, our teachers go with it. And we all know we shouldn’t get used to things that are bad for you.”

Rebecca Bratspies, who is director of the City University of New York School of Law Center for Urban Environmental Reform and also the parent of a third grader at P.S. 85, said last fall she and another parent, Eric Black, recorded a video from inside the classroom to show the level of noise students face. 

While they recorded, the parents measured the noise level in the classroom to be 90 decibels, almost double the normal standard. 

“[The children] come here every day trying hard to learn. They do their best,” said Bratspies. “Now we have to do our best.”


Late night Q trains to run local in Manhattan, decreasing wait times: MTA

| ctumola@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Cristabelle Tumola

Late night Q trains will be making all local stops in Manhattan starting this December, cutting wait times for straphangers, the MTA announced this week.

Currently, the line runs express in Manhattan between midnight and 6:30 a.m., bypassing the Prince St, 8 St-NYU, 23 St, 28 St, and 49 St stops.

With both the N and Q trains serving those stations during the late night hours, riders will see wait times decrease from an average of 10 minutes to 5 minutes because they could catch either line, according to the MTA.

After examining MetroCard data, the transit agency determined that riders at local stations will see average reduced travel times of more than six minutes, and express station customers will see average increased travel times of about one minute.

Though local Q service will lengthen the trips of approximately 1,700 customers, it will be off-set by the reduced wait times for about 1,300 customers at local stations, the transit agency said.

“We are constantly analyzing service and ridership trends in order to provide the best service possible to all of our customers at all hours,” said New York City Transit President Carmen Bianco.  “As we saw increased ridership at local stations along the Broadway Line, it simply made sense to provide these customers with more service.”

The increased service, which does not need MTA Board approval, will cost the agency $73,000 each year.




Overnight service disruptions on N, Q, R trains this week

By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

File photo

Starting Monday night, there will be service disruptions on the N, Q and R trains between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5 a.m for four consecutive weeknights, as part of the MTA’s Fastrack maintenance program:

  • N trains run in Queens and Brooklyn only.
  • Q trains run in Brooklyn and are rerouted via the D line in Manhattan.
  • R service ends early in Manhattan and Queens each night. (R shuttle service between 95th Street and 36th Street, Brooklyn runs all night.)

Travel alternatives

  • In Queens, take the M (or E local) instead of the R.
  • Take the 7 for service between Queens and Manhattan.
  • In Manhattan, use nearby stations on the 8th Avenue (A, E), 7th Avenue (1, 2) 6th Avenue (D, F, Q) and Lexington Avenue (4, 6) Lines.
  • Take the 2, 4, D, F or Q between Manhattan and Brooklyn.
  • N trains make local R stops between Jay Street-MetroTech and 36th Street.

Service disruptions on ‘N,’ ‘Q,’ ‘R’ lines this week

| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of MTA / Patrick Cashin

Starting tonight, there will be service disruptions on the “N,” “Q” and “R” trains between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5 a.m, as part of the MTA’s Fastrack maintenance program. The changes will last until Friday, February 1.

There will only be “N” service in Brooklyn and Queens, and the line will operate in two sections between Ditmars Boulevard and Queensboro Plaza, and between Stillwell Avenue and Jay Street-MetroTech.

After DeKalb Avenue, “Q” Manhattan-bound trains will run on the “D” line to 47-50th Streets, then to the 57 Street “F” station. Coney Island-bound “Q” trains will originate at the 57th Street “F” station then run via the “D” train to Brooklyn. Regular Coney Island-bound service resumes at DeKalb Avenue.

“R” train service will end early in Manhattan and Queens, with the last 95th Street-bound “R” train leaving 71st Avenue, and the last 71st Avenue-bound train leaving 95 Street at about 9:20 p.m. In Brooklyn, shuttle service between 36 Street and 95 Street will start early.

For alternative subway service during these disruptions, click here.



Pols call for safety measures after second subway shove death

| brennison@queenscourier.com

Photo by Wikimedia Commons user Hokachung

After a second New Yorker was pushed to his death in a subway station last month, a pair of local pols are calling for the MTA to take measures to ensure the safety of city straphangers.

Sunando Sen, 46, was killed Thursday, December 27 when he was shoved in front of an oncoming No. 7 train at the 40th Street/Lowery Street station in Sunnyside.

Police arrested and charged Erika Menendez, 31, of Rego Park, with murder as a hate crime after the suspect allegedly told investigators she pushed Sen because of her scorn for Muslims and Hindus.

“I pushed a Muslim off the train tracks because I hate Hindus and Muslims. Ever since 2001 when they put down the Twin Towers I’ve been beating them up,” she allegedly told detectives.

Menendez, who was seen at the station muttering to herself before shoving Sen, is reportedly undergoing psychiatric evaluation to determine if she is mentally stable.

“The defendant is accused of committing what is every subway commuter’s worst nightmare — being suddenly and senselessly pushed into the path of an oncoming train,” said District Attorney Richard Brown. “Beyond that, the hateful remarks allegedly made by the defendant and which precipitated the defendant’s actions can never be tolerated by a civilized society.”

This marked the second incident in December that someone was pushed to their death in a subway station. Ki-Suk Han, 58, of Elmhurst, was killed on December 3 when he was pushed in front of a Q train at the 49th Street-Seventh Avenue station. Suspect Naeem Davis was arrested and charged with second-degree murder.

Aside from the two push deaths, 52 other straphangers were killed on subway tracks this year, whether by accident or suicide.

Among the safety steps State Senator Jose Peralta and Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer proposed to prevent further fatalities were installing sliding doors, an intercom system that could connect riders with the Rail Control Center and more security cameras.

“It does strike me that in a post-9/11 world that there are no cameras at any stop,” Van Bramer said at a recent press conference.

The station where Sen was killed did not have any working cameras; Menendez was captured fleeing by nearby surveillance cameras.

“In less than a month, two of my constituents have been pushed onto subway tracks and killed,” Peralta said. “I urge the MTA to immediately act on common-sense measures to improve rider safety and security.”

Installing barriers between passengers and the train would “be both expensive and extremely challenging,” the MTA said in a statement. The agency did say though that they are considering testing such equipment “on a limited basis.”

— Additional reporting by Maggie Hayes