Tag Archives: principal

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

EVENT of the DAY: Summerstage WR/Felix Hernandez’s Rhythm Revue 

With over forty years in the music industry, their music and history transcends generations of pop culture and has a universal appeal to parents, grandparents, and children across the world. Also featuring DJ Felix Hernandez mixing in soul, Motown, funk, salsa and disco dance classics.

[Click here for more info or submit your events]

New $500,000 New York Hospital Queens Center for  Wound Healing at Silvercrest opens in Briarwood  

New York Hospital Queens and Silvercrest Center For Nursing and Rehabilitation celebrated the opening of the NYHQ Center for Wound Healing at Silvercrest with a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Tuesday, July 10. The new $500,000 center, at 144-45 87th Ave., in Briarwood, addresses the increasing need for more aggressive wound treatment for people with hard-to-treat chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers, diabetic ulcers and radionecrosis, officials said. Read more: [New York Daily News] 

Queens high school principal Caril Hudson Jr. arrested for possession of methamphetamine 

A Queens high school principal was nabbed just a block away from his school when cops found a baggie of methamphetamine in his car during a traffic stop, police said. Carl Hudson Jr., 33, was around the corner from Flushing High School on Northern Blvd. about 8:35 p.m on Tuesday when police discovered the meth in the bag in the car’s center console, police said. Read more: [New York Daily News] 

Far Rockaway man pleads guilty to JFK luggage thefts 

A Queens man is facing three to six years in prison after pleading guilty to a series of thefts from passengers in the terminals at John F. Kennedy International Airport. Queens District Attorney Richard Brown said Wednesday that 46-year-old Frederick McDonald of Far Rockaway, N.Y., had pleaded guilty to grand larceny in connection to six thefts. Read more: [1010wins] 

Bicyclist killed in hit-&-run 

A cyclist was fatally struck in Queens last night by a speeding car whose driver fled the scene, cops and witnesses said. The victim, who was carrying a bouquet of flowers, was struck at around 10:50 p.m. at Greenpoint Avenue and 39th Place in Sunnyside. Read more: [New York Post] 

 

Flushing High School principal arrested for possession of meth (UPDATED)


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/photo by Melissa Chan

Carl Hudson, principal of Flushing High School, was arrested Tuesday night and charged with one count of criminal possession of a controlled substance after cops say they found a ziplock bag full of methamphetamine and a glass pipe in his car.

The 33-year-old city schools employee was taken into custody on July 17 in front of 141-54 Northern Boulevard — less than half a mile away from the high school —  at 8:35 p.m., according to authorities.

Police said they uncovered one ziplock bag full of meth in a cup holder in the center console of Hudson’s car during a routine traffic stop. Soon after, Hudson gave cops permission to search his trunk, where they then found a glass pipe, according to the district attorney’s office.

Hudson pled guilty to disorderly conduct when he was arraigned last night, the district attorney’s office said. He was sentenced to a conditional discharge, which means his case will be dismissed after a year if he stays out of trouble.

An official at the district attorney’s office said Hudson will not be subjected to a fine and since he pled guilty to a violation, which is a non-criminal offense, he will not have a criminal record.

Hudson, a decade-long city schools employee, was already set to be replaced by Magdalen Radovich at the new Rupert B. Thomas Academy at the Flushing Campus this September if Turnaround plans went through.

He had been serving in an administrative capacity, education officials said, and will continue with administrative duties.

“I was pretty shocked when I found out. He doesn’t seem like the type of guy to get into trouble,” said Flushing High School student David Beranger, 16. “He was a good principal. He’s always showing people what to do. He’s not a laid back person. He’s always trying to enforce a good type of way for the school.”

Hudson, who officials say currently makes $133,834 a year, was appointed principal of Flushing High in March 2011.

Multiple calls made to a number listed as Hudson’s did not go through.

Flushing introduces new principal


| mchan@queenscourier.com

The Courier/Photo by Melissa Chan

The epilogue has been written for Flushing High School — but as the city concludes the final chapter of the storied 137-year-old institution, a new protagonist has entered the plot.

The Department of Education Division of Portfolio Planning hosted a meeting at Flushing High School — one day before the Panel for Educational Policy’s highly-anticipated vote — to introduce the school’s new leader, Magdalen Radovich, who will take over the reins at the embattled institution.

Radovich is currently an assistant principal at Queens Vocational and Technical High School in Long Island City, where she has served for 16 years — with half of the time spent as a teacher and the other half as an administrator.

“This has to be one of the most awkward meetings,” Radovich said to a small group of parents and students. “I don’t have all the answers. I know as little as some of you do about what’s going to happen tomorrow or the next day. I can promise you only that I will bring you the energy, commitment, dedication and the real belief that success is the only option for every kid, no matter what.”

Queens Vocational was on the city’s list of Persistently Lowest Achieving (PLA) schools up until recently, Radovich said. In terms of data, she said Flushing is similar to where Queens Vocational was six years ago, when the passing rate in the ninth grade was only about 50 percent — 38 percent less than its current standing.

“While we were on the PLA list, we felt kind of demoralized and stigmatized. But we knew that we had really good people who were working really hard to move us forward despite that. What really kept us moving were the kids,” Radovich said.
While similar in certain aspects, Radovich said Queens Vocational and Flushing largely differ in size, with Flushing being home to almost double the amount of students as Queens Vocational.

“You need to see things with different eyes. If something doesn’t work, it doesn’t mean that people aren’t working hard. It means that a different approach needs to be implemented,” she said.

Radovich — a mother of four, including one who is a junior in high school — began teaching in 1996 after dabbling in social justice work. She was a college professor for about 10 years, teaching remedial courses at New York University, Cooper Union, Pace University and John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

She said she hopes to carry on some of Flushing’s successful programs in the new school.

“I don’t have anything in particular in mind at this moment because it seems to me you have an awful lot here already that needs to be looked at carefully by the community and either built up or revised, but it’s definitely something that’s a priority for me,” Radovich said.

Flushing received a “D” on its most recent progress report, with an “F” in student performance, said DOE spokesperson Frank Thomas. The school was first designated as PLA in 2009 due to its consistently low graduation rates. While the numbers rose to 60 percent in 2010, the statistics still landed Flushing in the bottom 27 percent of schools in the city.

The new school — which has yet to be named — will serve between 3,035 to 3,075 students from grades nine through twelve, according to the DOE.

Parents call for P.S. 118 principal’s ouster


| chudson@queenscourier.com

Visit P.S. 118 in St. Albans most afternoons and you’ll find what you’d expect: rambunctious school kids chattering as they stream from the building, parents waiting, with varying degrees Of patience, to pick up their sons and daughters. But Fridays are a different story.

On Fridays what you find are a small but dedicated group of protesters calling for the ouster of Cynthia Ofori-Feaster, principal of the elementary school since 2009. Holding signs and chanting, “Save our children, Feaster must go!,” concerned parents and students have made a weekly appointment of their protest, with some going as far as rearranging their work schedules in order to attend regularly.

Several parents echo the same litany of charges against Feaster: she allegedly locked school bathrooms and turned off the water supply; she closed the school’s computer lab; a teacher’s aide was fired over the public address system; students are often left unsupervised in the school yard, with more than one parent citing that their children were injured as a result.

“It’s an endless cycle,” said Stacy Paupaw, who has two sons in the school, while wearing a T-shirt emblazoned with the “Feaster Must Go!” slogan. “The teachers in here are scared. They can’t even do their jobs because they’re frustrated. They used to come in happy. Now it’s like they can’t wait to clock out.”

PTA President Jasmin Farrier has been organizing the protests since January. According to Farrier, an investigation into the situation at P.S. 118 is currently underway by the Department of Education’s Office of Special Investigation (OSI). An OSI rep stated that their office does not speak to the media.

Prior to her election in June of 2011, Farrier had what she described as a “good rapport” with Feaster, and ran for the position in hopes that she could help ease tensions between the principal and the school community. Upon her election, and with her executive board accompanying her, Farrier had a meeting with the principal that left her confident that the PTA and Feaster could work together in a positive way moving forward. “We were ecstatic,” Farrier said.

But according to Farrier, the day after her election she attend a meeting of the School Leadership Team, a mandated body within each city school composed of parents and staff that has responsibility for creating the school’s Comprehensive Education Plan. Teachers at the meeting were “livid” over having been cut out of the crafting of the CEP, which per Chancellor’s regulation must be developed using a “consensus-based decision-making process.”

When addressing teachers’ concerns to Feaster, Farrier alleges the principal “called the teachers upstairs and began to scream at them as if they were animals.” Farrier was “blown away.” Since then, the relationship between Farrier and the principal has deteriorated.

Parent Kisha Noel recently quit her job in management in order to become more actively involved in her son’s school community. Invited to join the PTA by Farrier, Noel learned of the Learning Leaders School Volunteer Program. It was only after completing her requisite training that Noel learned P.S. 118′s participation in the program was suspended by the principal.

Now Noel is committed to showing up each week to advocate for the parents’ goal: the removal of Feaster.

“I strongly believe that with her removal a change will come about. But because of what she’s instated and embedded in there for these three years, it will be a long time before we can clean it out,” she said.

Calls to P.S. 118 for comment went unanswered.

Top Headlines From Around the Web


| jlane@queenscourier.com

Graphic by Jay Lane

Jets get Tebow from Broncos for two late draft picks

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Two bandits hold up Brooklyn bodega at gunpoint

Two bandits held up a Brooklyn grocery store during a terrifying gunpoint robbery this morning. The crooks stormed into Monumental Grocery store on Flatbush Avenue at 8:30 a.m. shocking a group of customers stuck inside, according to the owner Erasmos Perez, 55, who spoke to an employee manning the register when the mayhem unfolded. Read More: New York Post

 

Republican Holds Lead In Brooklyn State Senate Race

A special election for a State Senate seat in Brooklyn remains too close to call. Democratic City Councilman Lew Fidler and Republican lawyer David Storobin are vying for the seat in the 27th State Senate District. With 100 percent of precincts reporting, Storobin leads by 120 votes. Nearly 2,100 absentee ballots were issued and have yet to be counted. The seat used to be held by Carl Kruger, who resigned in December after pleading guilty to corruption charges in connection with a bribery scheme. Read More: NY1

 

Occupy Wall Street protesters rush back in when Union Square Park reopens in morning

Occupy Wall Street protesters reclaimed a space in Union Square at dawn Wednesday, minutes after police reopened the park to the public for the day. Cops erected temporary barriers around the plaza near the south entrance to the park at nightfall, pushing the demonstrators out of the area to prevent them setting up camp. Read More: Daily News

 

Student busted for assaulting dean at Brooklyn high school

A student was arrested after assaulting a faculty member at a Brooklyn high school this morning, school officials said. The 17-year-old boy got into a heated dispute with Edmund Ludde, the dean at William H. Maxwell High School, as he was getting scanned at the school’s security checkpoint at 9:20 a.m., officials said. Read More: New York Post

 

NYPD and FBI tussle over turf, with consequences for terror cases as police expand role: report 

In the fall of 2010, the FBI and New York Police Department were working together on a terrorism investigation on Long Island. The cyber case had been open for more than a year at the U.S. attorney’s office in Brooklyn. So, the Justice Department was surprised when, without notice, the NYPD went to federal prosecutors in Manhattan and asked them to approve a search warrant in the case. Read More: Daily News

 

The Situation realized alcohol intake out of control while filming ‘Jersey Shore’: report

Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino hit rock bottom while filming the most recent season of reality hit “Jersey Shore,” reports say. With Sorrentino reported to have checked into rehab, sources tell TMZ that the hard-partying star’s substance abuse issues were progressively “getting worse” throughout the filming of season five of the series, which recently aired on MTV. Read More: New York Post

P.S. 159 consistently got an ‘A’


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan. Class 3-313 posed with Principal DiDio and Assistant Principal Andrew Pecorella.

The unwavering commitment toward consistency paid off for newly-minted Blue Ribbon school P.S. 159.

The Bayside school was honored for being a high performing school on September 15. According to David Thomas, spokesperson for the United States Department of Education, the school received the award for consistently performing at high levels on New York State assessments in both reading and mathematics. The school’s most recent assessment test scores place it amongst the highest in the nation.

In fact, the school has received an “A” on every state exam for the last four years.

“I’ve been here for 15 years. For a school to do well, perform well, have high performing students for any length of time is a great feat,” said Assistant Principal Andrew Pecorella.

The award couldn’t have come at a better time for Principal Paul DiDio, who took over the post only two months ago. DiDio said former principal Marlene Zucker — who retired after 20 years — deserves due credit.

“If you don’t have a good leader, you don’t have a good school,” he said. “She set the bar high, but I’m very happy to have landed in this school. It’s been a really great ride so far.”

DiDio and Pecorella said the award could not have been achieved without the joint efforts between good teachers, an active parent population, students and the community.

“We take a very holistic approach. You don’t win an award like this without a joint effort,” Pecorella said. “We view this school as a family. We’re all working together toward the same goals — improving students’ academic performance and making sure they grow emotionally and socially.”

And more hard work is still to come.

“My goal as a first year principal is to continue the success of the school. I hope to have another ‘A’ at the end of the year, keep with what’s been positive here and keep leading the school down the right path,” DiDio said. “We just need to continue our success and build upon it.”