Tag Archives: primary

Sanders calls for Huntley to exit Senate race


| brennison@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/photo by Terence Cullen

In light of charges levied against State Senator Shirley Huntley, her primary opponent is calling for her to step down and exit the race for her seat immediately.

“With great regret, I am calling upon Senator Shirley Huntley to take the high road. Step aside so that a new voice can take over and you can deal with the legal problems you are dealing with,” said Councilmember James Sanders outside Queens County courthouse today, less than three weeks before the September 13 primary election.

Huntley was hit yesterday with conspiracy and tampering charges for allegedly attempting to cover up money her niece and aide stole from a Long Island nonprofit. Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said that when Huntley learned of the probe into her niece and aide, she penned a false backdated letter stating the nonprofit she founded, Parent Workshop, Inc.,  conducted workshops that never took place.

The three-time incumbent faces a fiercely contested primary in less than three weeks against Sanders and Gian Jones.

“The Senator should resign, effective immediately,” Sanders said.

The councilmember said Huntley deserves her day in court, but “you cannot deal with a 20-count indictment and effectively do the work of the people.”

This late in the game, the Board of Elections could not remove someone from the ballot, Sanders said, but a candidate could step aside and refuse to continue in the race.

Unions have contacted Sanders about switching their endorsements and the councilmember indicated some will come shortly. He added he looks forward to a “necessary” conversation with the Queens County Democrats, who endorsed Huntley, about possibly switching their support.

 

Electeds rally around Miller for re-election


| brennison@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/photo by Billy Rennison

A month before the polls open for the state primaries, local politicians stood alongside Assemblymember Mike Miller to lend their support for his re-election campaign.

Nearly half of the Queens assembly delegation and other area elected officials joined Miller, who is set to face off with Etienne David Adorno in the Democratic primary, outside his campaign office at 64-01 Myrtle Avenue in Glendale.

“Somebody who truly cares about the community, knows what the community needs, speaks for the community and works hard is not easy to find up in Albany, we have one in Mike Miller, he has to get re-elected,” said State Senator Joe Addabbo whose district overlaps with Miller’s.

The 38th Assembly District includes parts of Ridgewood, Glendale, Woodhaven, Richmond Hill and Ozone Park.

Community leaders and residents were also among the dozens of supporters that turned out for the Monday, August 13 rally.

“We had a lot of support tonight, because we work hard,” said Miller, whose campaign posters include his phone number, which he said will be answered 24 hours a day.

“We have residents here who we’ve helped at 2 or 3 in the morning.”

Adorno, 27, a resident member of the Woodhaven Residents Block Association and Community Board 9, joined the race in July, forcing the primary, which is set for September 13.

Today is deadline to register to vote in September primary; online registration now available


| brennison@queenscourier.com

File photo

With the state ranking near the bottom in voter registration, the governor announced a new initiative to allow online registration.

Residents can now log on to their computers to register to vote change their address or update party enrollment.

“We are knocking down longstanding barriers that have prevented many New Yorkers from participating in the democratic process, while creating a more streamlined and more efficient system that will save taxpayers’ money,” said Governor Andrew Cuomo.

Less than 64 percent of eligible voters are registered, ranking New York 47th in the nation.

If you want to register electronically, you can now visit the Department of Motor Vehicle’s “MyDMV” web site.  You will also be able to register paper-free at local DMV offices.

According to the governor’s office, registration rates jumped from 28 to 53 percent among voters 18 to 24 after online registration was introduced.

The announcement comes as the deadline approaches to register for the September primary.

If you want to be able to vote in the state primary elections on September 13, your application must be postmarked no later than Friday, August 17 and received by August 24.

Online registration must be done ahead of today’s deadline, also.

Click here to find out if you’re registered to vote

You may also register in person at your local Board of Elections or any voter registration center, but must do so no later than Friday, August 17.

If you need to file a change of address, it must be received by August 24.

Etienne David Adorno announces primary run against Assemblymember Miller


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

ADORNO 01w

Incumbent Assemblymember Mike Miller will now have a challenger for the 38th District, forcing a September 13 Democratic primary.

Etienne David Adorno, a 27-year-old Woodhaven native, announced on July 16 that he is running for the assembly seat, which Miller won in a 2009 special election.

“On September 13, 2012, I will be running in one of the most important primary elections we have ever seen in our days,” Adorno said during his announcement at the pedestrian plaza on Jamaica Avenue and Forest Parkway. “Winning the primary election in September will send a message to all, that come the general election in November, we will not only win, but also be taking the first steps to creating a more unified community.”

Adorno is a resident member of The Woodhaven Residents Block Association and Community Board 9. He most recently served as an aide to Manhattan Councilmember Robert Jackson.

Among the issues Adorno said he would work on if elected were safety and the cost of living.

“After all the years living here, I have witnessed so many of my closest friends move out of the area and others out of New York,” he said. “We need to change this, and ensure that we strengthen our middle class and reduce many of the tax burdens we impose on them.”

Miller said he’s confident going into the election.

“I look forward to campaigning against him,” he said, adding that he believed his record of serving the community over the last three years would help. “I feel very confident.”

Race for Lancman’s seat heats up as he declines district leader nom


| mchan@queenscourier.com

A defeated congressional hopeful abandoned his run for re-election as party district leader, giving his county-backed opponent an uncontested free ride to the September election.

Assemblymember Rory Lancman filed declinations with the Board of Elections on July 16 to pull his candidacy in the Democratic Leadership 25th District Part A race as male district leader.

The move allows Queens County Democratic Party pick Yuen Yee Kui of Flushing to run without an opponent. By bowing out, Lancman — a decade-long district leader — will also avoid the second battle in a year with a county candidate.

Lancman defied the county in the 6th Congressional District when he chose to run against party-pick Assemblymember Grace Meng, who won with nearly 53 percent of the vote in the June 26 primary.

He pledged not to run for re-election in his current Assembly seat if his campaign fell short of Capitol Hill, but sources close to him could not specify his next plans. There is, however, speculation he may seek a run for City Council or borough president.

“Rory has other professional and political priorities right now other than running for re-election as a Democratic District Leader,” said Dominic Panakal, Lancman’s chief of staff.

Meanwhile, the race to replace him is heating up as the two Democratic primary hopefuls battle it out over their campaign war chests.

Democrat Nily Rozic of Fresh Meadows, a first-time candidate, boasted she outraised her opponent Jerry Iannece, who is a county-backed Community Board 11 chair with an army of institutional support, with over $60,000 from more than 250 individual donors across the city.

But Iannece, who holds a war chest of a little over $53,000, said the bulk of Rozic’s funds came from family members at the 11th hour and residents who live outside of the district.

According to the state’s Board of Elections financial disclosure report, more than $17,000 came from contributors who appear to be Rozic’s family members. A large majority of donors, the report shows, also live in other districts around the borough, city and some out of state.

“Money doesn’t win an election,” Iannece said. “I didn’t try to play games and show people I have support. At the end of the day, I’m going to have more than enough money to run. I’m more than where I thought I would be.”

A source close to Rozic’s campaign said it is not uncommon for large funds to come from contributors who live outside of the district and that funds from blood relatives hold the same amount in weight as those from outside the family.

“Bottom line is I outraised him,” Rozic said.

 

Meng wins 6th District Congressional primary


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Alexa Altman

Assemblymember Grace Meng claimed victory by large margins in the hotly-contested 6th District Congressional primary race, according to Associated Press results.

“This is an important victory for Queens,” Meng said during her victory party at Plum Restaurant in Bayside. “This victory is about we. We made this together.”

Meng beat our her three rivals – Assemblymember Rory Lancman, Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley and Bayside allergist Dr. Robert Mittman – by winning 51 percent of the vote, according to AP reports as of 1 a.m. on June 27 when 89 percent of precincts were reporting.

Lancman who was largely seen as Meng’s top competitor — raked in the second highest amount of votes, taking in 28 percent, while Crowley garnered 16 percent and Mittman 5 percent.

“We are celebrating this evening because of you [voters]. We are here for each other and all look out for each other,” Meng said. “Let’s go win this thing in November.”

The candidates each threw their hats in the ring to replace U.S. Congressmember Gary Ackerman after the 15-term elected official announced in March he would not seek re-election this year.

Ackerman threw his support behind Meng on May 29, saying she was “head and shoulders above the rest” in the race. Meng went into the race already backed by the Queens County Democratic Party and gained a huge endorsement at the 11th hour from Governor Andrew Cuomo. She bagged several key endorsements along the way, including a last minute boost from the New York Times.

Lancman, who saw his “almost dream of a lifetime” come to an end, said in his concession speech he would support his Assembly colleague in the general election against Republican runner Councilmember Dan Halloran.

He also praised Crowley, saying she showed “extraordinary personal courage and hard work” in her try for the seat, and thanked his campaign team and supporters.

“What we built here as a campaign — I think starting from scratch and really starting without the infrastructure that comes with the support of the county organization — is something we can be extraordinarily proud of,” he said.

Before his speech, Lancman told a supporter he thinks Mittman may have taken the difference in votes between him and Meng.

The assemblymember, who pledged not to seek re-election for his current seat, did not specify his next plans. However, there are speculations he may seek a City Council or borough president position.

The race to replace him has already begun, with two Democratic and two Republican hopefuls announcing their candidacy.

It was also unclear after her concession whether Crowley intends to seek re-election to her Council seat, but she did confirm she would help get Meng elected.

While Crowley unofficially came in third in the race, she in her speech that her efforts three months ago showed how people choose the candidates, not an organization – alluding to her lack of support from both the County and possibly the party’s chair, who is also her cousin.

“This has been a rollercoaster ride of a campaign, and we really put up a good fight,” she said. “We showed that organized labor still has a voice in New York City.”

Meanwhile, a handful of hopefuls have already been eyeing Meng’s seat, while the assemblymember prepares for the November 6 general election against Halloran and Green Party candidate Evergreen Chou.

“Let’s run this campaign based on issues,” she said to Halloran. “Let’s not discuss race or religion or partake in scare tactics.”

With additional reporting by Alexa Altman and Billy Rennison

Primary Guide: U.S. Senate


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Name: Wendy Long

Party: Republican

Current Position: Long is a member of Mitt Romney’s Justice Advisory Committee, teaches Roman Catholic catechism in New York City for the Narnia program, and is a member of the New York City Parks Mounted Auxiliary Unit.

Personal Info: Long lives in Manhattan with her husband, Arthur, their two children, Arthur and Mado.

Issues: From the candidate’s website:

• Outrageous levels of debt

• Corporate cronyism

• Lack of an American energy policy

Platforms: “Men and women of good faith in every party want to see a new way of doing business in Washington. That is what I intend to offer in this campaign, and that is what I will deliver as the next United States Senator from the State of New York. I want to work for the people of New York to make it shine brightly again as a jewel in our national crown. Already, many good people all across this great state have put their trust in me. I intend to make myself worthy of that trust,” Long said on her website.

 

Name: George Maragos

Party: Republican

Current Position: Maragos is the elected Nassau County Comptroller. He was elected in 2009.

Personal Info: Maragos, a graduate of McGill University, has had over 35 years of senior management experience and accomplishments with leading organizations in banking, consulting and information systems, including founding and guiding a Wall Street financial technology services company. He is married to his wife, Angela, for 37 years. Together, they have two sons, a daughter-in-law and two grandchildren.

Issues: According to Maragos, government’s top priority should be to restore economic growth and enable the creation of good paying private sector jobs. He also believes Americans must make a national commitment to achieve energy dependence in 10 years and become a global leader in renewable energy technology.

Platforms: Maragos is running to reduce government deficit and entitlements, clear foreign policy, strengthen national security and improve education by abolishing the federal Department of Education and giving authority back to the states.

 

Name: Robert “Bob” Turner

Party: Republican

Current Position: Representative for the 9th Congressional District

Personal info: Turner has spent nearly his entire life within the 9th Congressional District. He grew up in Woodside – the oldest of three boys — and raised his own family in Richmond Hill. Turner has a bachelor’s degree from St. John’s University and served in the US Army. He ran against incumbent Congressmember Anthony Weiner in 2010 and lost. Turner beat State Assemblymember David Weprin in a 2011 Special Election after Weiner resigned – becoming the first Republican to hold the seat since 1922. Former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani endorsed Turner’s bid for the Senate seat. Before running for Congress, he spent more than 40 years in the television industry.

Issues/Platforms:

• Cutting taxes

• Supports the construction of the Keystone Pipeline

• Well-prepared military

• Small government

• Following the Constitution

• Repeal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

 

Check out the primary guide for all the races:

5th Congressional District

6th Congressional District

7th Congressional District

8th Congressional District

Low voter turnout expected in 6th District primary


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Candidates in a hotly contested Queens congressional contest expect few of the more than 180,000 registered Democrats to head to the polls for the upcoming primary.

The estimates of the 6th District’s candidates align with a recently released study that found less than a third of registered voters cast a ballot in New York City.

“Voter Turnout in New York City,” a report by the city’s Campaign Finance Board, found that New York City falls well below the state and nation in the percentage of voters that head to the polls.

Only 28 percent of registered voters cast a ballot during 2010’s midterm election, compared to 53 percent in the rest of New York, and 46 percent nationally. A major city race in 2009 did little to boost that number, as just 29 percent of people voted in that year’s mayoral election.

Candidates in the upcoming 6th District Democratic primary do not expect to approach even those numbers.

The campaigns for Assemblymembers Grace Meng and Rory Lancman both expect about 32,000 voters — which equals just 17 percent of the 183,000 registered Democrats.

Candidate Dr. Robert Mittman said he would be surprised to see even 30,000 people at the polls.

Most of the district had between 11 and 25 percent voter turnout in the 2009 elections, the finance board’s report found.

“It’s difficult to predict turnout for such an unprecedented primary election date,” said Austin Finan, Meng’s spokesperson.

Prior to this year, federal primaries were held in September, but were moved in January to comply with the federal MOVE Act, which was enacted to aid voting for those serving in the military overseas.

“It’s going to be a low turnout election,” Lancman’s spokesperson Eric Walker said. “Ask any political professional what’s the most important thing in a low turnout election — and it’s your field operation and your ‘get out the vote’ operation.”

Lancman’s field operation includes going door to door and identifying voters.

With low numbers expected, every vote takes on greater importance.

“We are trying to get as many people out to vote as possible,” said Eric Yun, Crowley’s spokesperson. “We are targeting every vote we could possibly get.”

The campaigning will go down to the very last minute, said Finan.

“We’ve run the strongest, grassroots field operation throughout the course of the campaign, and we are extremely well prepared to get out the vote in the final days of the campaign,” Finan said.

The primary is set for June 26.

- Additional reporting by Melissa Chan