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Primary Day 2014 coverage


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

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Check back here for The Queens Courier’s Primary Day coverage from the casting of ballots to the election results.

12:03 a.m. 

The District 11 race has been called: Incumbent state Sen. Tony Avella defeats John Liu.

11:05 p.m.

Leroy Comrie has been declared the winner in the State Senate District 14 race, defeating incumbent Malcolm Smith at 70.9% with 81.7% of the precincts reporting.

10:55 p.m.

Incumbent Toby Stavisky wins her race in State Senate District 16.

10:35 p.m.

Incumbents state Sen. James Sanders and Assemblywoman Margaret Markey have been declared winners in their races.

10:22 p.m.

Governor Andrew Cuomo has been declared the winner in the Democratic primary, Kathy Hochul in the lieutenant governor race: AP

9:00 p.m.

Polls are now closed.

6:16 p.m.

Leroy Comrie: “Honored to have Mayor @BilldeBlasio here in the 14th Senate District to help #gotv for our final push!”

Photo via Twitter/@Leroycomrie

Photo via Twitter/@Leroycomrie

5:06 p.m. “Speaking to voters in Briarwood with Assemblyman @DavidWeprin and @ElizCrowleyNYC”: 14th District State Senate candidate Leroy Comrie

Photo via Twitter/@Leroycomrie

3:18 p.m. State Senate candidate John Liu admonishes a Queens resident for wearing a Yankees shirt: “We’ll get you a Mets shirt.” 

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THE COURIER/Photo by Eric Jankiewicz

3:11 p.m. The Queens Courier found this John Liu  taxi getting the word out during Primary Day.

THE COURIER/Photo by Eric Jankiewicz

THE COURIER/Photo by Eric Jankiewicz

3:01 p.m. State Sen. Avella’s crew lays a stake at P.S. 191.

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THE COURIER/Photo by Eric Jankiewicz

2:37 p.m.  11th District State Senate candidate John Liu talks to a parent at P.S. 191, who told him to do something instead of just making promises.

THE COURIER/Photo by Eric Jankiewicz

THE COURIER/Photo by Eric Jankiewicz

2:26 p.m. “Happy to do my civic duty this Primary Day. #nycvotes,” Toby Ann Stavisky tweeted.

Photo via Twitter/@tobystavisky

Photo via Twitter/@tobystavisky

1:52 p.m. State Sen. Tony Avella talks to a constituent near the voting site at P.S 169. The polling place has recorded 400 votes since 6 a.m.

THE COURIER/Photo by Eric Jankiewicz

THE COURIER/Photo by Eric Jankiewicz

12:08 p.m. State Sen. Toby Ann Stavisky, who is up for re-election: “All smiles on Primary Day with @AndrewHevesi @CMKoslowitz”

Photo via Twitter/@tobystavisky

Photo via Twitter/@tobystavisky

11:30 a.m. John Liu votes this morning, hoping to defeat incumbent state Sen. Tony Avella. “Running and voting as a proud #truedemocrat, joined by @MelindaKatz on #PrimaryDay”

Photo via Twitter/@LiuNewYork

Photo via Twitter/@LiuNewYork

10:44 a.m. 30th District Assembly candidate Dmytro Fedkowskyj: “So proud of my daughter, Deanna, who is voting for the 1st time today. Let’s vote for change! #PrimaryDay #AD30″

Photo via Twitter/@FedkowskyjForNY

Photo via Twitter/@FedkowskyjForNY

10:22 a.m. State Sen. Tony Avella’s crew passes around fliers in Bayside just off of Bell Boulevard. 

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THE COURIER/Photo by Eric Jankiewicz

10:04 a.m. “Our support has been incredibly positive and when the polls close, we are confident that our campaign will be victorious, ” Tony Avella said in a statement after the incumbent state Senator voted this morning. “Voters understand that this race boils down to which candidate they trust to uphold this office with honor and integrity, and John Liu doesn’t pass the laugh test on either account.”

Photo courtesy of Tony Avella

Photo courtesy of Tony Avella

9:38 a.m. Leroy Comrie casts his vote. “I just voted! Thanks @TishJames for joining me! #gotv”

Photo via Twitter/@Leroycomrie

Photo via Twitter/@Leroycomrie

9:10 a.m. Public Advocate Letitia James joins 14th District State Senate candidate Leroy Comrie in Queens.

Photo via Facebook/Leroy Comrie

Photo via Facebook/Leroy Comrie

7:48 a.m.

11th District State Senate candidate John Liu greets voters at the LIRR Bayside station.

“Greeting morning commuters bright and early with @edbraunstein reminding people to vote.”

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Photo via Twitter/@LiuNewYork

 

 6:00 a.m.

Polls are open and will close at 9 p.m. You can find your poll site location at http://nyc.pollsitelocator.com or by calling the voter Phone Bank at 1-866-VOTE-NYC.

Here are the list of Queens candidates in the Democratic primary for state Senate and Assembly, as well as the candidates for governor and lieutenant governor:

State Senator (10th District)
Everly Brown
Gian Jones
James Sanders Jr. *

State Senator (11th District)
Tony Avella*
John Liu

State Senator (14th District)
Munir Avery
Leroy Comrie
Malcolm Smith*

State Senator (16th District)
S.J. Jung
Toby Ann Stavisky*

Assembly (30th District)
Dmytro Fedkowskyj
Margaret Markey*

Governor
Andrew Cuomo*
Randy Credico
Zephyr Teachout

Lieutenant Governor
Kathy Hochul
Timothy Wu

Incumbent = *

PRIMARY DAY 2013 COVERAGE


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

File photo

Check back here for continuing Primary Day coverage from the casting of ballots to the election results.

11:52 p.m.

Projected winners in Queens city council districts:

City Council District 22 – Costa Constantinides

City Council District 28 - Ruben Wills

City Council District 24 -Rory Lancman

City Council District 31 -Donovan Richards

City Council District 32 – Lew Simon

11:36 p.m.

Melinda Katz projected as winner in Queens borough president race, beating Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr.

11:33 p.m.

Scott Stringer is projected as the winner in Democratic comptroller race, beating Eliot Spitzer.

11:25 p.m.

Christine Quinn has conceded the Democratic race for mayor.

11:13 p.m.

Councilmember Letitia James and State Senator Daniel Squadron will go on to runoff in Public Advocate race.

Squadron released the following statement:

“Over the next 21 days, we’ll keep talking about my record — about results, reform, and integrity. And we will talk about my plan to make the Public Advocate’s office essential to our city, getting results for New Yorkers who need them.”

“Thank you to all of our supporters. We wouldn’t have gotten this far without you. Now let’s bring it home.”

11:00 p.m.

Joe Lhota projected as winner of Republican mayoral primary.

10:45 p.m.

Democratic mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner makes concession speech:  “Sadly, I was an imperfect messenger.”

10:29 p.m.

Borough President race: Katz is a little over 25,000 and Vallone is not yet at 20,000 with more than half of precincts reporting.

10:22 p.m.

Leading in citywide races with 26 percent reporting: de Blasio 39 percent, Lhota 50 percent, Stringer 52 percent, Squadron 34 percent.

10:19 p.m.

City Council District 31 incumbent Donovan Richards with 61.2 percent of votes, with 13.8 percent precincts reporting.

Incumbent Councilmember Ruben Wills currently with 48.9 percent of votes, with 22.5 percent precincts reporting in City Council District 28 race.

10:12 p.m.

Borough President Candidate Melinda Katz is up about 1,000 votes now with 12 percent precincts reporting.

9:30 pm.

Exit polls show Bill de Blasio with a strong lead in the mayoral race, according to reports, and Scott Stringer ahead in the comptroller race.

9:00 p.m.

Polls are now closed.

3:43 p.m.

City Council District 22 candidate John J. Ciafone voted today together with his wife and son.

“I’m getting a good feeling but of course we don’t know until the end of the evening,” he said. “I’m optimistic.”

“It’s been a long journey and hopefully it’s not the end of the road, it’s a new beginning,” he said.

1 p.m.

Lew Simon, Democratic candidate for City Council District 32, votes at P.S. 114 in Belle Harbor.

Photo courtesy of Simon’s campaign

11:30 a.m.

Republican mayoral candidate John Catsimatidis stops by Bay Terrace poll site P.S. 169.

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

11:15 a.m.

State Senator Daniel Squadron, running in the Democratic Public Advocate Primary, votes alongside his son at P.S. 29.

Photo via @DanielSquadron

11:05 a.m.

Democratic City Council District 22 candidate Costa Constantinides voted together with his four-year old son, Nikolas, and wife, Lori, at P.S. 85 in Astoria this morning.

“I feel great, it’s been a wonderful day,” he said.

“It was a really special moment to cast a ballot with my son,” he continued.

“Of course I’d like to win, but it’s more than me winning, it’s about representing the community.”

THE COURIER/Photo by Angy Altamirano

10:56 a.m.

City Council District 27 Candidate Joan Flowers gives a thumbs up after voting today.

THE COURIER/Photo by Maggie Hayes

10:31 a.m.

City Comptroller candidate and Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer voting today.

@Stringer2013:

“Just voted with my beautiful wife and family. An exciting and proud moment!”

Photo via Twitter

10:22 a.m.

Chrissy Voskerichian, candidate for City Council District 19 in northeast Queens, casts her ballot this morning in the Democratic Primary.

Photo courtesy of Voskerichian’s campaign

10:21 a.m.

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, vying for the Democratic mayoral nomination, votes in Manhattan.

@Quinn4NY:

“Joined by Kim and my dad to cast my vote this AM in Chelsea! We have work to do and a world to change! #VoteQuinn ”

Photo via Twitter

10:12 a.m.

Public Advocate candidate and Councilmember Letitia James voting this morning.

@TishJames:

” just did my civic duty and cast my #vote

10:09 a.m.

Republican mayoral candidate Joe Lhota casts his ballot.

Photo via @JoeLhota4Mayor

10:00 a.m.

City Council District 19 candidate Austin Shafran exits the booth after casting his vote in Bay Terrace.

9:52 a.m.

Democratic mayoral candidate Erick Salgado votes with his spouse Sonia and son Derick at I.S. 51 in Staten Island

Photo via @ErickSalgadoNYC

9:48 a.m.

Democratic mayoral candidate Sal Albanese votes.

@SalAlbanese2013:

“I voted this morning. Now, it’s your turn! ”

9:30 a.m.

City Council District 19 candidate John Duane votes at P.S. 94

9:00 a.m.

Borough president candidate Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr. cast his ballot at P.S. 122 in Astoria.

Photo courtesy of Vallone’s campaign

8:30 a.m.

Democratic City Comptroller candidate Eliot Spitzer in Queens this morning.

@Spitzer2013:

“#SpitzBlitz taking it to #Queens.  We need an independent voice for NYC”

Photo via Twitter

8:25 a.m.

City Council District 27 candidate Manuel Caughman voting this morning.

Photo courtesy Caughman’s campaign

8:24 a.m.

Republican mayoral candidate John Catsimatidis signing in to vote.

Photo via @JCats2013

7:47 a.m.

@deBlasioNYC:

Public Advocate and Democratic mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio casts his ballot in Park Slope, Brooklyn.

“Just voted! Make sure you do too: http://BLAS.IO/POLLS #VotedeBlasio”

Photo via Twitter

7:15 a.m.

City Council District 27 candidate Sondra Peeden votes at P.S. 118 Lorraine Hansberry School.

Photos courtesy of Peeden’s campaign 

7:06 a.m.

Democratic mayoral candidate and former City Comptroller Bill Thompson votes.

@BillThompsonNYC:

“I just voted! Now get out to the polls and exercise your right to vote. ”

Photo via Twitter

6 a.m.

Polls are now open and will close at 9 p.m. You can find your poll site location online at http://nyc.pollsitelocator.com or by calling the voter Phone Bank at 1-866-VOTE-NYC.

 

 

Street Talk: Are you voting in the Primary? Why or why not?


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

street talk

Yes, I am. I’m voting because I am tired of Mayor Michael Bloomberg. I want to see more change in our small communities, not only for the rich.

Michelle Rojas

I am definitely voting because I think it is important to narrow down our options so whoever is the better candidate in each party will be left for the people to make their ultimate decision.

Cris Capello

Yes, I’m going to vote. The number one reason is to exercise my right. Though I hate to see Mayor (Michael) Bloomberg go. He’s been a good and bad mayor.

Joseph Frank

Yes, because I am supposed to. I want to see that we keep the city safe.

Dimitri Sulantzos

Yes, I will because it is important to get your voice heard. Every vote counts.

Gina Liberta

I will be voting because it is my right to vote and I always vote. Narrowing down is better.

Cindy Rubin

I probably won’t. I just don’t really follow the primaries. When it comes to the mayoral elections I’ll vote.

Alanna Cohen

I won’t and really never have. I always vote for the mayor and the president though.

Jenna Massa

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Primary Day voters’ guide


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

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Mark your calendars: Tuesday, September 10 is Primary Day.

Voting is our American right, and we strongly urge everyone to make his or her way to the polls. There is no excuse.

On Election Day, polling places are open from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.

According to the Board of Elections, you can find your poll site location online at http://nyc.pollsitelocator.com or by calling the voter Phone Bank at 1-866-VOTE-NYC.

This year we will be casting our Primary ballots for mayor, public advocate, city comptroller, borough president, city council and even state committee members.

If needed, a runoff is scheduled for October 1 when no candidates in a citywide primary election receive at least 40 percent of the vote.

In case you missed the primary guides we’ve been posting on our website, here are the links:

Read them, learn about the candidates and make an informed decision.

It is up to us to elect those men and women who will lead our city and our borough most effectively.

Let your voice be heard. Every vote counts.

Voters, pols say poll site mix-ups were rampant


| mchan@queenscourier.com

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A series of mix-ups, stemming from confusion from both voters and poll workers, plagued several election sites in the borough during last week’s primary, according to local elected officials.

Assemblymember Mike Miller — who bested his opponent, Etienne David Adorno, by a 71 to 29 percent margin — said he had to battle several slipups by poll site workers and the Board of Elections (BOE) last Thursday, September 13, before securing his win.

A major mishap, he said, occurred for the first four hours on election day, when a poll site inspector at P.S. 113 in Glendale shooed away Democratic voters, saying there was only a Republican and Independent primary in the 38th District.

“That was a major issue,” said Miller, who is now running unopposed in the upcoming November general election. “It could have cost both of us votes. It was a crazy day. We just wanted to get it taken care of.”

At least five different individuals looking to exercise their rights were also misled by poll workers at P.S. 239, the incumbent said. They were sent back and forth between the Ridgewood elementary school and Christ Tabernacle in Glendale, which is almost a mile away. A Woodhaven woman was also denied an affidavit ballot at P.S. 97, Miller said.

Several poll sites across the city changed after recent redistricting redrew the boundaries of election districts, said BOE spokesperson Valerie Vazquez. Alternative poll sites also needed to replace numerous locations throughout all five boroughs, including 51 in Queens, that were found not to be handicap accessible, she said.

But some mailers sent out by the BOE last month notifying voters they had new stations were given the incorrect address, officials said. Vasquez said the agency was under pressure to get the mailers out between August 1 and 5 and said some voting sites were incorrect as a result.

State Senator Toby Ann Stavisky, who also claimed victory in her district race, said her office fielded a mixture of complaints last Thursday, primarily stemming from people who were sent to the wrong polling place.

Primary Day Election Guide


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

ELECTION

There are nine state primaries in Queens to be decided today — six Democatic, two Republican, one Independence.  Polls opened at 6 a.m. and will remain open until 9 p.m.  To find out where you can vote click here.

Primary Guides:

Senate District 10

Senate District 15

Senate District 16

Assembly District 25

Assembly District 33

Assembly District 38

Assembly District 40

Live Coverage: Queens Primary Day at the races


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/photo by Alexa Altman

11:40 P.M.

In a released written statement, Bob Turner, who lost tonight’s U.S. Senate Republican primary to Wendy Long said:

“I congratulate Ms. Long on her impressive victory tonight. I want to thank Chairman Cox and all of the Republicans from across the state who supported me in this campaign. I went to Congress last year as a citizen legislator on a clear mission to help save our nation from the harmful big-government policies that are keeping New Yorkers out of work, small businesses shuttered and record levels of debt on the backs of our children. Senator Gillibrand has made a dramatic transformation from her days as a conservative Democrat to now being named the nation’s most liberal senator as a loyal supporter of the Obama-Reid agenda. I remain steadfastly committed to these goals and I pledge to work with Ms. Long to unite all Republicans and Conservatives in the effort to defeat Kirsten Gillibrand in November.”

11:30 P.M. 

Several media sources are also reporting Gregory Meeks the primary winner in District 5, Grace Meng in District 6 and Wendy Long in the  U.S. Senate Republican primary.

 

 

 

 

 

11:05 p.m.

Incumbent Congressmember Nydia Velazquez will continue her run for an 11th term on Capitol Hill, after the New York Times reported the Brooklyn-based representative had won a four-way primary. Velazquez—who is running in the new Congressional District 7— is now running unopposed for the seat, as there is no current Republican candidate.

The new district spans from Chinatown, through Brooklyn and into Woodhaven. Queens residents who were once represented in the soon-to-be defunct District 9 had expressed concern about the redistricting and how they would be represented in such a diverse Congressional area.

10:50 p.m.

Assemblymember Hakeem Jeffries defeated Councilmember Charles Barron in the Democratic primary, and will now face Republican Allan Bellone on November 6. In the days and weeks leading up to the election, Jeffries received key endorsements from Senator Charles Schumer, former Mayor Ed Koch, Assemblymember Philip Goldfeder and State Senator Joseph Addabbo. The newly-drawn District 8—though mainly made up of Brooklyn neighborhoods—includes parts of Howard Beach and Ozone Park.

10:25 p.m.

Eddie Boles, treasurer of the Uniformed Fire Officers Union, who campaigned with Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley throughout Queens today, spoke with many undecided voters:

“We emphasized the point that she’s a person that cares about constituents, community.”

“She’s a doer. She provides results.”

While he said he couldn’t know for sure whether Crowley would win, Boles did say “I’m confidant in her ability to be a good congresswoman.”

9 p.m.

Poll are closed. Stay with the Queens Courier for all the results.

6:50 p.m.

Quotes from outside P.S. 173 in Fresh Meadow:

“I’m voting for Crowley because she looks intelligent.  If she wins we will give her a chance to prove to us what she is worth,” Rose Giraldo, 64.

“I don’t really know who is on the ballot, but I’m going to go check it out,” Victor Chan, 36.

6:30 p.m.

Poll monitors at P.S. 173 in Fresh Meadows said 450 voters have been there and the after work crowd is picking up.

5:45 p.m.

According to poll monitors at M.S. 158 in Bayside, 132 have voted between the hours of 6 a.m. and 5 p.m.

5:30 p.m.

The Courier spotted poll workers at M.S. 158 in Bayside single-handedly taking down Assemblymember Grace Meng’s campaign flyers, which were placed on the gates surrounding the school. It is prohibited to place or wear campaign paraphernalia within 500 feet of polling locations, they said.

Earlier this morning, a poll worker at P.S. 173 in Fresh Meadows told Assemblymember Rory Lancman to take off a campaign sticker he was wearing on his suit that displayed his name when he went to cast his vote.

4:17 p.m.

City & State is reporting that supporters of Assemblymember Rory Lancman and Robert Mittman got into a “heated altercation.”

A man from the Orthodox Jewish anti gay-marriage group Jews For Morality told the site, “I don’t understand why I was attacked by several members of the Lancman campaign. They felt somehow that we were being disingenuous.”

2:30 p.m.

As Congressmember Nydia Velazquez is out at polling stations just hours before polls close, she has been advising that her name is mistranslated in Chinese, DNAinfo has reported.

Velazquez is running in a four-way primary in a newly-drawn district that spans from Chinatown, through Brooklyn and into Woodhaven.

The translation of the 10-term congressmember’s name was in eight characters, DNAinfo reported, which when pronounced did not sound like Velazquez’s name.

Multiple calls to the Board of Elections were not answered.

1:35 p.m.

By 11:30 a.m., 120 voters had cast their ballots at St. Andrew Avellino School in Flushing. While the turnout seemed weak for such a contentious race, those present fervently believed their involvement could make a difference.

“The primary is more important than the general election,” said Moogseog Mah, a 60-year-old Flushing resident. “Without the primary, I can’t choose who I want.”

Claudia Sargent, a 57-year-old Flushing resident, said voting in the primary allotted her a “grassroots approach” to politics.

“The primary is where you really get to make your mark, both literally and figuratively,” said Sargent. “I see good possibilities in two candidates, but I voted my conscience. When you vote in the general election, you are voting for the candidate that the [political] machine has chosen for you.”

1:30 p.m.

Assemblymember Hakeem Jeffries, running for the 8th congressional district, walked to P.S. 9 in Brooklyn shortly after 9:45 a.m., with his two sons, Joshua, 8, and Jeremiah, 10, to cast his ballot.

He was completely confident of victory.

“Oh we’re going to win the Democratic primary,” said Jeffries when asked if he doesn’t win the primaries will he still run with another party.

Jeffries said that the early primaries and redistricting presents a challenge, but he still connected with the community.

“There is certainly a challenge as it relates to the accelerated primary and the fact that we have to deal with the redistricting year,” he said. “But that said we’re confident that we’ve identified thousands of supporters who are going to come out and support us today.”

Jeffries also said the district lines, which are comprised of parts of Brooklyn and Queens, will not be a problem.

“There are things that unify people all across this congressional district. Everybody cares about safe streets. Everybody cares about good public schools everybody cares about a strong economy. We are bringing people together all across the congressional district in neighborhoods throughout Brooklyn and queens. I’m confident that at the end of the day we are going to be successful,” he said.

12:30 p.m.

Assemblymember Grace Meng arrived at St. Andrew Avellino School in Flushing at 11 a.m., ready to cast her vote.  Accompanied by husband Wayne, 37, and their young sons, Tyler, 4, and Brandon, 2, the congressional hopeful smiled as she received a warm welcome.

“We’re expecting a slightly low turnout,” said Meng, who joked she just spotted a family trailing suitcases, leaving for vacation. “We’re still hopeful for the evening rush. Hopefully more people will come out to vote.”

The predicted low turnout did not bother the assemblymember, who mentioned she feels she is getting a great amount of support from the community.

“Several people have said they’re voting for me,” she said.

Meng claimed a major push of her campaign involved spreading the word throughout the borough about voting in the primary, held this year in June for the first time in many years.

“We’ve made tons of phone calls and knocked on tons of doors and hopefully by the close of voting today and the close of the polls we’ll see a good turnout,” said Meng.

Toting Brandon on her hip, Meng strolled into the building to file her ballot.

“We’re very excited to cast out vote for Grace Meng,” said the assemblymember. “We look forward to the results and getting right to work.”

 

12:30 p.m.

Assemblymember Rory Lancman cast his vote at 11 a.m. at P.S. 173 in Fresh Meadows with the support of his two daughters, who helped scan his ballot.

“I’ve always been excited about election day, just being involved in politics my whole life. The elections that I get to vote for myself are even more exciting,” said Lancman, one of four 6th District primary candidates.

Lancman was surrounded by his two daughters, 10-year-old Laura Hannah and 12-year-old Gail, his 14-year-old son Jonathan and his wife Morgan.

“Running for office is a lot of fun, but it’s a tremendous sacrifice for the family,” he said. “It really is a team effort.  My two daughters in particular helping me put my ballot through the scanner was really very nice.”

According to volunteer at a poll site, 211 people had casted their vote at about 11 a.m.

“I feel very confident that we’re going to win,” Lancman said. “I think we have an understanding of what the universal voters are going to be in this race based on past races. We focused our efforts on making sure that we get our message out to who we think is going to vote. From what we can see, we’ve pretty much been accurate about what the universe is. I think we’ll have a good result tonight.”

12:40 p.m. Congressmember Bob Turner cast his vote in the Republican primary race for U.S. Senate earlier this morning in his hometown neighborhood of Breezy Point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

11:00 a.m.

Congressmember Gregory Meeks cast his vote at about 9:45 this morning in St. Albans at P.S. 118 Lorraine Hansbury School.

With him was his wife, Simone Marie Meeks, who also cast her vote. The long-time congressmember said he was confident going into the last stretch of campaigning before ballots close tonight.

“I feel good, you never take anything for granted,” Meeks said. “You know you’ve got to earn everybody’s vote, and that’s what we try to do.”

Meeks said Congressional District 5’s diversity in many ways made it an area he looked forward to representing again. “I think it’s an exciting district,” he said. “It’s a district that looks like America when you think of it.”

 

 

 

10: 45 a.m.

Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley cast her vote this morning at P.S. 113 in Glendale flanked by her sons Dennis and Owen after talking to voters in Forest Hills.

“I feel strong. Ive been getting a great response from the people,” the 6th District candidate said.  “I outworked my opponents and I think its been a good campaign.”

The primary comes a day after the city agreed on a new budget that saved the 20 fire companies that were threatened to close.

Crowley who chairs the Fire and Criminal Justice committee said, “Closing even one fire company would have reduced response times and people’s lives would have hung in the balance.”

Surrounded by supporters from the Uniformed Fire Officers union, who endorsed her, Crowley added, “I’m so grateful to have the support of the uniformed fire officers, the firefighters, they’re out there working hard and helping get out message across to the voters.”