Tag Archives: presidential election

What Obama and Romney said at the final presidential debate


| brennison@queenscourier.com

romney obama


More than 17,000 words were spoken during the third and final debate between President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney at Lynn University in Boca Raton. The words uttered tonight will be dissected in the next two weeks ahead of the election on November 6. The most common words were what you would expect to hear in a debate on foreign policy — except maybe bayonets.

World (said 67 times), military (49), Iran (47), leadership (46), nuclear (39), budget (35) all were among the most stated terms during the 90-minute clash moderated by Bob Schieffer.

But instead of telling you, take a look yourself at the top 250 words you heard over and
over tonight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 12 last day to register for general election, mayoral primary


| brennison@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/photo by Alexa Altman

If you want to cast a ballot in this year’s presidential election — or next year’s mayoral primary — October 12 is the last day to register to vote.

New York ranks near the bottom of the country in voter registration; less than 64 percent of eligible residents are registered to vote, ranking the state 47th in the nation.

Click here to find out if you’re registered to vote

To be able to vote in the general elections — which includes president, Congress, Senate and state offices — on November 6, your application must be postmarked no later than Friday, October 12 and received by October 17. You may also register in person at your local Board of Elections or any voter registration center.  Change of addresses must also be received by October 17.

Governor Andrew Cuomo announced a new initiative in August — online registration — to help increase voter numbers.

According to the governor’s office, registration rates jumped from 28 to 53 percent among voters 18 to 24 in Arizona after online registration was introduced.

Residents can now log on to their computers to register to vote, change their address or update party enrollment.

If you want to register electronically, you can now visit the Department of Motor Vehicle’s “MyDMV” web site.  You will also be able to register paper-free at local DMV offices.

Though it is nearly a year away, unregistered voters or those wishing to switch parties have until October 12 if they would like to vote in the 2013 mayoral primary elections.  City residents cannot change enrollment and vote in that parties primary in the same year.

The city’s Board of Elections website says, “The last day to change your enrollment is the same as the last day to register for the General Election.”

According to the New York Times, “The law is rooted in the notion that closed primaries should not be raided, at the last minute, by outsiders who may want to pick, say, a weaker candidate to run against their preferred choice in a general election.”

Ron Paul is his choice


| editorial@queenscourier.com

Ordinarily, I would not be writing to a newspaper or even worrying about national politics, but I fear for the future of this country.  Today’s policies are unsustainable, and no matter which party is in power, the problems will remain.  We are now on a course which has brought an end to many a civilization before us.  How many times do you think they can raise the debt ceiling before a collapse?          It is now unquestionable: Ron Paul is the one principled voice in a field of counterfeit conservatives.  Paul’s budget plan includes $1 trillion in real cuts, a necessary measure that no other Republican has had the fortitude and good sense to propose. 

Our children stand to suffer a great deal if we do not correct our mistakes.  Conservatives know that central government planning is to blame, and the solutions are to be found in our Constitution, which restrains politicians from making mischief and consigns them to the service of all Americans’ best interests.  How can we trust these other candidates, when none of them ever saw it coming?  

In 2008, Paul fought TARP and the Fed and warned about the housing bubble, while the politically-connected laid waste to our economy.  Mitt Romney and the other candidates applauded the disastrous “Big Government” interventions and even suggested the economy was as strong as ever.  Well, we now know better.  

Republicans, please join me in making Ron Paul our next president.   Paul is the one we can trust to restore integrity and strength to our constitutional republic.

Dylan J. Robnett,
Rego Park

Eliminate voter apathy


| editorial@queenscourier.com

Amazingly, consumers seem to be spending, and Americans appear to be shedding the anxieties that have stymied confidence. American optimism is a remarkable resource that defines the U.S. as exceptional among all the nations.

Yet, the problems and threats confronting the world are ongoing and real. The multitude of dangers that could impact the U.S. make for jittery investors and frighten people, including those whose decisions will affect future employment. It also provides fodder for political gamesmanship that disregards the common good seeking electoral advantages.

The foolish vindictiveness of the political wars gave birth to the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street movement. At first glance, these groups would appear as far apart as possible. The common thread is the unfairness felt by their members. Americans have concluded that government and the ground rules that have traditionally governed people’s lives have been turned into political spoils used to secure future support.

Politicians have concluded that most people do not vote. The voters who count are those who do so during primaries. As the most committed voters, they usually represent hardcore advocates of extreme positions. As a consequence, only those seeking an elected office that panders to the extremes have any hope of winning their party’s primary.

Citizens are in the streets across the nation and at rallies decrying anyone who believes that government is a force for good. Probably those who are protesting will participate in the upcoming presidential election process. It would be a shame if potential voters conclude that the process is so alienating as to excuse them from voting. Only when voter apathy is defeated and Americans accept their obligation to participate can America begin healing from the polarizing cancerous political wars that currently are normal.

Edward Horn