Tag Archives: pope resignation

Queens and the world bids farewell to Pope Benedict XVI as he leaves Vatican


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy The New York Daily News

It’s official: Pope Benedict XVI is now “Pope Emeritus.”

His holiness officially left his post, the first Pope to do so in nearly 600 years, on Thursday, February 28 — as Cardinals from around the world gather to find a replacement.

Catholics in the city, and Queens, will now wait as a new leader of nearly 1.2 million faithful is selected. One of those in the process, and a potential replacement, is Cardinal Timonthy Dolan.

At Saint Nicholas of Tolentine Parish, in Jamaica, Rev. Anthony Nzegwu prayed for the pope and the church during noon mass today.

“God made it possible for us to witness this historic moment,” he said. “He’s given us the opportunity to pray hard for the church. This is not a time to criticize the church.”

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

TODAY’S FORECAST

Wednesday: Mostly cloudy with a chance of rain in the afternoon. High of 41F. Winds less than 5 mph. Chance of rain 60%. Wednesday night: Overcast with snow and rain, then snow after midnight. Low of 32 with a windchill as low as 25. Winds from the ENE at 5 to 15 mph shifting to the NNE after midnight. Chance of snow 70% with accumulations up to 2 in. possible.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Queen of Hearts Valentine’s Pop Up Market

Check out the Queen of Hearts Valentine’s Pop Up Market at Veslo in Astoria for a night of fun! There will be shopping, arts, fabulous gifts, a  DJ, complimentary cocktails and yummy cuisine. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Snow alert issued for NYC

Although it will be nothing close to what Nemo brought to the New York City area last week, there is more snow in the forecast. Read more: Queens Courier

New York State pushes banks to release over $200 million in Sandy aid

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Tuesday that his administration is working with banks to release nearly $208 million in checks already approved for victims of Superstorm Sandy. Read more: CBS New York

Queens man says video, graphic images prove police used excessive force in his arrest

Robert Jackson said that police caused a scar shaped like a horseshoe on the side of his face. Read more: NY1

Obama urges Congress to make government work for “the many”

U.S. President Barack Obama challenged a divided Congress on Tuesday to raise the minimum wage and make government work for “the many” in a State of the Union speech focused on economic fairness for the middle class as the Democrat takes a more assertive tack in his second term. Read more: Reuters

California fugitive is believed to gave died in blaze after shootout

After a shootout and a forest standoff on Tuesday afternoon, Christopher J. Dorner, the former Los Angeles police officer sought in the region’s largest manhunt, was apparently killed in a cabin as it burned down around him, but officials said they needed time to sort through the rubble. Read more: New York Times

Pope Benedict makes 1st appearance since resignation

Looking tired but serene, Pope Benedict XVI told thousands of faithful Wednesday that he was stepping down for “the good of the church,” speaking in his first public appearance since dropping the bombshell announcement of his resignation. Read more: ABC New York

“Banana Joe” named Westminster’s Best in Show

A five-year-old Affenpinscher from the Netherlands named ‘Banana Joe’ was chosen for Best in Show at the 137th Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. Read more: NY1

Local Catholic leaders react to Pope Benedict’s resignation


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Catholic News Service

Catholic leaders around the city are reacting with surprise and well-wishes to the news that Pope Benedict XVI will resign as leader of the Catholic Church effective Thursday, February 28.

His holiness, elected to lead the Vatican in 2005, announced early on Monday, February 11 he no longer felt physically or mentally able to guide the church.

Benedict XVI is the first Pontiff to resign since Pope Gregory XII in 1415 — when the Catholic Church faced an internal rift. Traditionally, a pope is elected until his death, after which a new leader is elected by the College of Cardinals.

As Pope, Benedict XVI serves as the spiritual leader of roughly 1 billion Catholics worldwide, as well as the political leader of the Vatican — the epicenter for Catholicism and one of the world’s smallest nations.The Pontiff is also the second consecutive non-Italian pope. Pope John Paul II, who was Polish, became the first church leader who was not Italian elected in 455 years. The incumbent Pope was born as Joseph Ratzinger in the Bavarian region of Germany.

The Rev. Nicholas DiMarzio, Bishop of the Diocese of Brooklyn, said he found out about the Pope’s decision around 6 a.m. on February 11. DiMarzio said while he was surprised by the news, he was knew Benedict had considered the move for some time.

“Two years ago he indicated that if he could not carry out the responsibilities he would resign,” DiMarzio said. “He prepared us with the eventuality that he might resign.”

Benedict XVI, who will turn 86 this April, was tired by from a combination of his age and his schedule, DiMarzio said.

“I’m sure they’ll elect another Pope,” he added. “Hopefully one with emotional, physical and spiritual qualities necessary to lead the church.”

Parish leaders throughout Queens gave their comments on His Holiness’ decision to resign after succeeding Pope John Paul II almost 8 years ago.

Monsignor Michael J. Hardiman of St. Sebastian’s Roman Catholic Church in Woodside said the Pope’s move would breathe new life into the church and allow for new leadership to spark a revival in the church.

“Pope Benedict [is] going out and saying, ‘We’re a new church again,’ and it’s an opportunity for the church to have new leadership,” Hardiman said. “Personally I think he was probably one of the persons who was closest to Pope John II, and he saw the last months of  his life and how debilitated he became; he wasn’t in charge any longer.”

Father Thomas Brosnan, pastor of Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church in Bayside, said the news was not earth-shattering, but would set a new policy that Popes may be able to step down, should they feel unable to lead the church.

“It had to happen sooner than later with the lifespan of people now,” Brosnan said. “If the Pope gets debilitated, that always has to be faced. It sets a precedent in the future that it’s okay to have a retired Pope.”

Bill Donohue, president of the New York-based American Catholic League, released seven points that the Pope’s legacy would be strongly preserved. During the Pope’s tenure, Donohue said, he was tolerant and tried to strengthen bonds with the rest of the world and create a better understanding.

“The pope reached out to dissidents on the right and the left, seeking to bring them to communion,” Donohue said. “Not all his efforts succeeded, but his attempts were noble.”

President Barack Obama issued a statement a few hours after the Vatican confirmed the news:

“On behalf of Americans everywhere,” he said, “Michelle and I wish to extend our appreciation and prayers to His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI. Michelle and I warmly remember our meeting with the Holy Father in 2009, and I have appreciated our work together over these last four years. The Church plays a critical role in the United States and the world, and I wish the best to those who will soon gather to choose His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI’s successor.”

Additional reporting by Alexa Altman, Melissa Chan and Maggie Hayes 

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES