Tag Archives: Parade

Little Neck residents come together to save annual Memorial Day Parade


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

File photo

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The show will go on.

The United War Veterans Council (UWVC) hosted the first of a series of meetings to organize the Little Neck-Douglaston Memorial Day Parade, which was in danger of being canceled this year, on Wednesday, March 19, at Community Church of Little Neck.

Since the former parade board was dissolved, the UWVC, which organizes the annual National Veterans Day Parade in Manhattan, reached out to help save the event.

The UWVC isn’t taking over the event, but just wants to help the community organize the parade, which started in 1927.

“We’re not uncomfortable by taking this leap, and we are not uncomfortable to say to you that if you want it, we could help you get it done, but we can’t do it, you have to do it and we will help you keep on track and make sure that it happens,” said Vince McGowan, president and founder of the UWVC.

About 60 residents, some of who were on the former board of the parade, packed the room at the church, full of resolve to keep the parade alive.

The UWVC just took a census from the room about saving the parade. They then talked about the committees that would be needed to organize the parade, including the Executive Division, Legal, Treasury, Parade Operations, Marketing, Public Relations, and Institutional Involvement, Dignitary, Opening and Closing Church Ceremony Committees. They also noted possible volunteers from the community.

Past parades cost about $30,000, so the UWVC believes it should cost about the same this year. The group is pledging $10,000, and former State Senator Frank Padavan donated $1,000, according to Geraldine Spinella, who was the head of the Treasury Committee of the former board of the parade. Many kinks still need to be worked out, but residents left feeling confident the parade will be back again.

“The best people in the community were in this room and they will get it done,” said Spinella, who volunteered to continue as the head of the Treasury Committee.

Anyone that wishes to volunteer should attend the next meeting on Wednesday, March 26 at 7:30 p.m. at Community Church, or visit the parade’s website or Facebook  and Twitter accounts.

 

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De Blasio joins Sunnyside and Woodside to celebrate St. Pat’s for All Parade


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo by Ed Reed for the Office of Mayor Bill de Blasio

Sunnyside and Woodside got all dressed up in green for the annual St. Pat’s for All Parade Sunday.

The parade, which ran down Skillman Avenue, featured the young and old, and even some four-legged friends celebrating St. Patrick’s Day.

After deciding to boycott the city’s annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade, because of its ban on LGBT pride banners or signs, Mayor Bill de Blasio took the trip to Queens to march in the Sunnyside parade.

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De Blasio was joined by other elected officials including City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, Public Advocate Letitia James, City Councilmembers Daniel Dromm and Jimmy Van Bramer, Senators Michael Gianaris and Grace Meng, and many more.

The Grand Marshals of the parade were Terry McGovern and Tom Duane.

St. Pat’s for All is known to be the city’s most diverse St. Patrick’s parade, embracing LGBT groups, community organizations, school bands, Irish organizations and, religious and civic groups.

An annual post-parade party followed at Saints & Sinners Irish Bar & Grill.

 

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The history of St. Patrick and his parade


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

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By Will Sammon

On St. Patrick’s Day, almost everyone wants to be Irish, however, not everyone really knows why. New York City, from 44th Street to 86th Street, will be the biggest site of green attire and leprechaun attitude on March 17, the date of the annual holiday. But how does any of that, and all the beer drinking, relate to the importance of St. Patrick and the origin of the parade?

The History Behind St. Patrick

The answer, as you may have guessed, is nothing. But that is not to say you should not celebrate it, especially if you are of Irish descent.

The presumption that St. Patrick drove all the snakes out of Ireland is largely a myth, according to Seamus Boyle, national president of the Ancient Order of Hibernians in America, Inc. (AOH). He did, however, convert many Irish people to Catholicism. The Order is a Catholic Irish American fraternal organization founded in New York City in 1836. Within 200 years of Patrick’s arrival, Ireland was completely Christianized.

St. Patrick was born in Britain to wealthy parents near the turn of the 4th century. At the age of 16, Patrick was taken prisoner by a group of Irish raiders who attacked his family’s estate. They whisked him away to Ireland where he spent six years in captivity.

According to his writing, God’s voice told him to leave from Ireland, and after more than six years of being held captive, the saint escaped. He walked nearly 200 miles from County Mayo, where it is believed he was held, to the Irish coast.

After escaping to Britain, Patrick reported that he experienced a second revelation — an angel in a dream told him to return to Ireland as a missionary.

The Parade

The St. Patrick’s Day Parade marched for the first time on March 17, 1762, 14 years before the Declaration of Independence was adopted. Today, it is the largest parade in the world, according to parade secretary Hilary Beirne.

To this day, the St. Patrick’s Day Parade remains true to its roots by prohibiting floats, automobiles and other commercial aspects in the parade. Every year 150,000 to 250,000 marchers, many bagpipe bands, politicians and approximately two million spectators lining up on Fifth Avenue, are involved in the celebration, according to the parade committee.

The St. Patrick’s Day Parade is run by a private corporation, The New York St. Patrick’s Day Parade Committee. The parade workers and committee members are all volunteers.

The first St. Patrick’s Day Parade in New York was held on lower Broadway in 1762 by a band of homesick Irish expatriates and Irish military serving with the British Army stationed in the American colonies in New York City, according to Beirne. This was a time when the wearing of green was a sign of Irish pride and was banned in Ireland. The parade participants reveled in the freedom to speak Irish, wear the green, sing Irish songs and play the pipes to Irish tunes that were deeply meaningful to the Irish immigrants who had fled their homeland.

The Parade starts at 44th Street at 11 a.m. and is held every March 17, except when March 17 falls on a Sunday; it is celebrated the day before, because of religious observances. The parade marches up Fifth Avenue, past St. Patrick’s Cathedral at 50th Street, all the way up past the Metropolitan Museum of Art and American Irish Historical Society at 83rd Street to 86th Street, where the parade finishes around 4:30 to 5 p.m.

 

Phagwah parade celebrates spring’s arrival


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Nirmal Singh

In celebration of a fast-approaching spring, the Hindu community gathered in Richmond Hill to celebrate Holi at the annual Phagwah parade. Over 3,000 people shared in this joyous event, throwing brightly-colored liquid and powder on each other, a tradition that reminds the participants that spring is near.

Holi is celebrated during the months of March and April, and while it is primarily a Hindu festival, it is also recognized as a multi-ethnic, multi-religious celebration that unites a community.

Several Hindu texts explain the significance of Phagwa. One tells the story of Prahalad, the son of an evil king named Hiranyakashipu. The king sought to destroy his son, enlisting the help of his equally evil sister, Holika – a figure who is said to be immune to destruction by fire. The king commanded Holika to end the boy’s life by throwing him into a fire. Inhibited by Prahalad’s strong faith, Holika’s powers were diminished and she succumbed to the fire.

The parade began at 33rd Street and Liberty Avenue on Sunday, March 11 around noon. Parade-goers, floats from various temples and even elected officials marched down Liberty Avenue and ended at Smokey Oval Park, where there were musical and cultural performances.

Sunnyside and Woodside hold St. Pat’s For All Parade


| brennison@queenscourier.com

3-4 St. Pats (FINAL6)

Woodside and Sunnyside recently showed their Irish side.

The 2012 St. Pat’s For All Parade was held on Sunday, March 4, beginning in Sunnyside at 47th Street and Skillman Avenue and ending in Woodside at 58th Street and Woodside Avenue.

The parade featured a wide variety of marchers, from residents and elected officials to community groups and visitors from the Emerald Isle. The grand marshals were Peter Quinn, a novelist and Irish historian, and Mary Brosnahan, executive director of the Coalition for the Homeless.

First held more than a decade ago, the parade celebrates the diversity of the Irish communities of New York and is open to all feeling green.

“I think the parade was one of the largest we have ever had,” said Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer. “The weather was unusually good. We had a lot of marchers and it was a very fun parade.”

Queens’ Morning Roundup – 11/18/2011: Deadly Woodside House Fire


| jlane@queenscourier.com

Graphic by Jay Lane

Deadly Woodside House Fire

A fire that broke out inside a house in Woodside early Friday morning claimed the life of one woman and injured four other people. The FDNY says the fire was reported at 1:15 a.m. at a two and one-half story house on 61st Street between Woodside Avenue and 43rd Avenue. Read More: Fox News

Queens Thanksgiving Zombie Walk set  to invade streets of Astoria

When hundreds of zombies take to the streets of Astoria this weekend to feed on the flesh of human victims, it won’t be an apocalypse as much as a fantasy come to life. The first annual Queens Thanksgiving Zombie Walk on Saturday is just the latest crawl to capitalize on the growing craze for everything undead and supernatural. Read More: Daily News

Queens Singer Sues Management Company for Defamation

A Queens singer who has worked with the likes of Britney Spears has filed an $18 million lawsuit against her management company for allegedly trashing her as a racist trollop. In her Manhattan Supreme Court suit, Annet Artani says that instead of furthering her career, SWAP Management portrayed her as a lazy bimbo whose “constant offerings of sexual favors for a recording contract caused her to lose much credibility with some of the music community.” Read More: New York Post

St. John’s And Hofstra Renew Queens-Long Island Rivalry On Friday

St. John’s will take to the road for the first time this season on Friday as it travels just a half an hour east on the LIE to face in-state opponent, Hofstra. St. John’s and Hofstra have not played each other since 2005, but Friday’s contest is the 15th game between the two schools. Tipoff is slated for 7 p.m. at the Mack Sports Complex. Read More: Red Storm Sports

News from the Occupy Movement – 200 Are Arrested as Protesters Clash With the Police

Thousands of protesters across the country flooded streets, squares, bridges and banks on Thursday, snarling traffic and often clashing with the police in a show of support for the Occupy Wall Street movement, two months to the day after the demonstration began. In Lower Manhattan, protesters tossed aside metal barricades to converge again on Zuccotti Park after failing in an attempt to shut down the New York Stock Exchange. Read More: New York Times

Flushing resident dies in Long Island Hit and Run

 

Authorities say a Long Island man is charged with hit-and-run following an accident that killed a bicyclist from Stony Brook University. The accident occurred around 9:45 p.m. Thursday in Stony Brook. Suffolk County police identified the victim as 21-year-old Seong Hoon Baek of Flushing. Read More: Wall Street Journal


Parade is source of (Italian) pride


| tcimino@queenscourier.com

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Get ready to paint the town green, white and red this weekend.

This Sunday, Howard Beach will be awash with Italian pride as the Howard Beach Columbus Day Foundation Inc. presents its 6th annual Columbus Day Parade.

Beginning at noon on Cross Bay Boulevard, there will be floats, live entertainment, Italian delicacies and specialties (zeppole anyone?), elected officials — and a lot of “orgoglio” (pride).

Previous parades have drawn thousands of spectators and honorees such as Rosanna Scotto from Fox 5.

The Howard Beach Columbus Day Foundation is a non-profit organization whose goal is to promote the Italian culture and well-being of society by scholarships, educational programs and community activities.

Every year, the Foundation celebrates the largest Italian-American Columbus parade. Spectators travel as far as from Italy to participate in the enjoyment of the parade.

The Foundation rewards its members and supporters by a Dinner Dance Gala to commemorate their hard work and dedication. This year, it will recognize six honorees: Nicholas DiMarzio, Roman Catholic bishop, diocese of Brooklyn; Sergeant Anthony Cesarano, president of the NYPD Columbia Association; Mitchell Weiss, NYPD chief clergy liaison; Josephine Maietta, board member of Italian Heritage and Culture Committee of New York; former U.S. Senator Alfonse D’Amato and entertainer Angelo Venuto.

The Gala will be held on September 29 at 6:30 p.m. at Russo’s On The Bay.