Tag Archives: P.S. 91

In Glendale, schools chancellor calls for parents to get involved


| r.pozarycki@timesnewsweekly.com

Photo courtesy of Councilwoman's Elizabeth Crowley's office

Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña came to Glendale’s P.S. 91 on Wednesday, urging parents to seek seats on education councils and become more involved in their local public schools.

Elections are held every two years for seats on all 32 community education councils (CEC) and the citywide councils for high schools, English language learners, special education and District 75 schools.

The advisory bodies hold monthly meetings, examine issues relevant to the district and offer recommendations for or against certain policies.

“The community and citywide education councils help shape education policies and maintain strong relationships with families and the community,” Fariña said. “Education councils make important contributions to their communities, and I want to encourage parents across the city to apply for a seat.”

“We need our community education councils to represent diverse needs and voices of public school parents,” added Councilwoman Elizabeth Crowley, who joined Fariña at P.S. 91 on Wednesday. “If any parent has ever wanted a more direct line of communication with the Department of Education, this is the best way to do it.”

Parents of a child currently enrolled in a public school within their district are qualified to pursue a seat on their respective education council. No prior experience is necessary; people of all languages are welcome.

Applications are being accepted through Mar. 11; all candidates will meet with parent associations and parent-teacher associations within their district to solicit votes.

Three officers from each PA or PTA will cast online ballots for the council candidates of their choice between Apr. 19 and May 8. Winning candidates will then undergo training and leadership development for their positions.

For more information, visit www.nycparentleaders.org. The election results will be posted on the website on May 12.

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Glendale teen Dylan Bilski excels in academics, athletics and art


| editorial1@queenscourier.com

dylan4w

Dylan Bilski, born and raised in Glendale, is a prime example of a young adult creating positive change within the community.

For over 10 years, Bilski has volunteered with various organizations, including the Edward R. Miller VFW Post 7336, Disabled American Veterans Chapter 118, St. Mary’s Healthcare System for Children in Bayside, the East Coast Car Association Toys for Tots and many more.

Bilski attended P.S. 91,  and is now a student at the Fiorello H. LaGuardia School of the Performing Arts, also known as the FAME school. Maintaining a 95 average, Bilski who also paints, participates in local sports through organizations such as CYO and RGMVM baseball.

In addition, he was a member of the Queens Falcons undefeated championship football team and the Queens Falcons Spring League championship team, playing as a lineman for both. Finally, Bilski plays varsity baseball and basketball as a member of the Boys Club of Flushing.

“We are extremely proud,” said dad Mike. “Everything he does is perfection. He excels in academics, athletics and art — all three rolled into one.”

Bilski possesses a whole-hearted dedication to paying respect to the veterans who have served. He has marched in the Queens Veterans Day parade for the last three years, and recently participated in the Flag Retirement Ceremony in Flushing, as well as the Maspeth and Glendale Memorial Day Parades.

This Memorial Day weekend, Bilski received three awards, including one from the Disabled American Veterans, Auxiliary Unit and the VFW Miller post.

His passion for service and his selfless outlook is admired throughout the community and is a defining example of a young adult creating substantial change.

And for all this he credits his father.

“I think my dad was my main influence,” he said. “He always told me to get involved and give back, which gives you a good feeling.”

Bilski’s accomplishments have been noted through citations from local politicians and groups he has volunteers for. His service extends to organizations including the Knights of Columbus and his local church, Redeemer Lutheran of Glendale.

And, it seems, the teen has his future mapped out.

Bilski received a full scholarship, valued at $42,000 per year, to attend Ashville Preparatory School in North Carolina. Recognized as one of the most prestigious preparatory schools in the United States, he will be attending Ashville Prep in August with hopes of attending Annapolis in the fall of 2014. Ultimately, he said, he wants to serve as a naval officer and work for either the FBI or CIA.

Bloomy fights truancy, launches $9M ad campaign


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Mayor Michael Bloomberg

Missing just two days of school per month may not seem serious, but it presents a major obstacle to a high school diploma.

Seventy five percent of chronically absent sixth graders — defined as missing 20 or more days of school, or two per month — fail to graduate high school, said Mayor Michael Bloomberg at a press conference at P.S. 91 in Glendale, where he launched a new ad campaign to fight truancy.

“Those numbers aren’t surprising,” the mayor said, who added nearly one in five students are chronically absent. “If you aren’t in school, you can’t learn.”

The city launched a pilot program — “Every Student, Every Day” — in September 2010 to help reduce chronic absenteeism by assigning students mentors. P.S. 91 has seen chronic absenteeism drop by 26 percent in its first year in the program, and it has fallen by 27 percent in the 50 pilot schools.

Fifty additional schools will be added to the program this fall.

Quinn Corcino,Jr., a fifth grader at the Glendale school, spoke directly to the difference he has experienced at school a year after missing 29 days.

“I am really, really proud this year at school, and I like it more now that I’m there all the time,” said Corcino, who has missed just three days of school so far. “Having good attendance and getting a good education will really help me in life.”

Medical issues in the family led to the forced absences, said Corcino’s father, Quinn Sr., but the program has provided the family with help to minimize the days absent.
“It’s made him a higher achiever,” Corcino Sr. said. “This year he’s in honors classes, top of his class.”

The $9 million campaign, which has been placed in subway stations, on bus shelters and newsstands, updates the well-known ad questioning parents where their children are at night, instead asking, “It’s 9 a.m., do you know where your kids are?”

Bloomberg said that the campaign was rolled out now due to the typical spike in absences in May and June.
A new web resource for parents was also introduced, schooleverydayNYC.org. Parents can log on for resources to help reduce absenteeism and to review attendance records for their children.

Beginning May 19, DOE employees will be at the Flushing branch of the Queens Library between noon and 4 p.m. to aid parents on using the site.

 

 

Mayor Michael Bloomberg launches campaign fighting chronic absenteeism


| brennison@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Billy Rennison

Missing just two days of school per month may not seem serious, but Mayor Michael Bloomberg said today that it presents a major obstacle to a high school diploma.

Seventy five percent of chronically absent sixth graders — defined as missing 20 or more days of school, or two per month —fail to graduate high school, the mayor said at a press conference at P.S. 91 in Glendale where he launched a new ad campaign fighting truancy.

“Chronic absenteeism also is often a child’s first step down the wrong path in life,” Bloomberg said.

The $9 million campaign updates the well-known ad questioning parents where their children are at night, instead asking, “It’s 9 a.m., do you know where your kids are?”

P.S. 91 is one of 50 pilot schools throughout the city partaking in the program “Every Student, Every Day,” which helps reduce chronic absenteeism by assigning students mentors.

In its first year in the program, P.S. 91 has reduced chronically absent students by 26 percent.