Tag Archives: P.S. 232

State Senator Joseph Addabbo to hold town hall meeting on Common Core standards


| mhayes@queenscourier.com


The Common Core learning standards are creating a stir, and State Senator Joseph Addabbo wants to hear from parents, students and educators.

Addabbo is holding a town hall meeting on Thursday, Feb. 13, seeking input on what some have called “controversial” core standards.

Issues regarding new federal standards – including privacy concerns – and the efficacy of using standardized tests in conjunction with the core will be addressed. Also discussed will be eliminating testing in younger grades and the correlation between test results and administrative performance.

“Common Core has a noble goal: that of preparing all of our children for college and successful careers,” Addabbo said. “However, its implementation so far has been haphazard at best and nightmarish at worst, causing great concern and stress.”

This will potentially be the first meeting in a series of Common Core gatherings. It will be held at P.S. 232 the Walter Ward School from 7 to 9 p.m.

For more information or to express interest, contact Addabbo’s Howard Beach office at 718-738-1111.

 

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Speed board installed near Lindenwood’s P.S. 232


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of the Office of Assemblymember Phillip Goldfeder

Speeders take note and slow down.

A new mobile speed board has been installed across the street from P.S. 232 in Lindenwood, right outside the bustling Lindenwood Shopping Center on 153rd Avenue.

“The Department of Transportation (DOT) has finally responded to our concerns,” said Assemblymember Phillip Goldfeder, who requested a “traffic calming device” be brought into the area.

School officials, parents and community members have been asking and fighting for safer streets around the elementary school for years. Administration and faculty members frequently escort students across the busy intersection at 153rd Avenue and 83rd Street.

In September, State Senator Joseph Addabbo requested P.S. 232 receive speed cameras for a pilot program designed to nab speedy drivers around city schools.

Now, the DOT has stepped in and put up the temporary speed board, setting the speed limit at 25 miles per hour. The organization is still completing a study that will determine whether speed bumps are needed in the area. DOT’s School Safety Unit has also committed to coordinate with the school’s parents and students to identify other solutions.

Goldfeder said the speed board will “deter drivers from using this stretch of road as a personal speedway.”

“This is the first step in the right direction, but we must remain vigilant to protect our children and community,” he said.

 

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Tudor Village voters granted poll site switch in time for general election


| mhayes@queenscourier.com


The good fight was won, and a poll site switch will give residents an easier travel route straight to the ballots.

Councilmember Eric Ulrich wrote to the Board of Elections (BOE) in September on behalf of Tudor Village voters, whose poll site was switched from P.S. 63 in Ozone Park to P.S. 232 in Lindenwood.

“The Board of Elections should be making it easier, not harder, for people to vote,” Ulrich said.

In order to get to P.S. 232, Tudor Village residents would have to cross the Belt Parkway. Ulrich said this task is “nearly impossible” without a car, and since the change was made, voter turnout from the area had decreased and “residents remain concerned about their ability to make it to the polls in the future.”

Michael Ryan, BOE executive director, responded to Ulrich and said these voters will be assigned to vote at J.H.S. 202 in Ozone Park, just in time for the November general election.

“This change will certainly be more convenient and will enhance the safety of the voters as they will no longer be required to cross a busy thoroughfare to exercise their right to vote,” Ryan said.

J.H.S. 202 is less than a mile from Tudor Village’s initial P.S. 63 poll site.

“I am pleased that the BOE was able to accommodate the residents of Tudor Village. By making it easier for them to exercise their right to vote, we are ensuring that every voice can be heard on Election Day,” Ulrich said.

 

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Councilmember wants poll site switch for Tudor Village voters


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Maggie Hayes

With the general election approaching, one candidate wants any and every voter at the polls.

The Board of Elections (BOE) rezoned Tudor Village voters two years ago from P.S. 63 in Ozone Park to P.S. 232 in Lindenwood. Councilmember Eric Ulrich, who is running for re-election, is requesting the BOE switch it back.

“The Board of Elections should be making it easier, not harder, for people to vote,” Ulrich said.

In order to get to P.S. 232, Tudor Village residents would have to cross the Belt Parkway. Ulrich said this task is “nearly impossible” without a car.

Ulrich said that since the change was made, voter turnout from the area has decreased and “residents remain concerned about their ability to make it to the polls in the future.”

Ulrich is running against Democrat Lew Simon in the November general election and wants the BOE to re-designate P.S. 63 as the Tudor Village voting site “as soon as possible” so residents can vote “without impediment in the upcoming election.”

“Tudor Village residents should be able to vote in their own neighborhood,” he said. “I hope the Board of Elections comes to their senses and reverses this decision before November.”

The BOE said as a result of a decision made by both Queens Commissioners, they have agreed to move forward in making the change and it will possibly in place by the general election.

 

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Push for speed cameras around Howard Beach schools


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File photo

Speeding drivers will be put to a stop if one south Queens pol has his way.

State Senator Joseph Addabbo is pushing for Howard Beach’s P.S. 232 and 207 to be considered for a pilot program designed to nab speedy drivers around schools.

A new state law went into effect on Saturday, August 31 that permits the city to establish a five-year demonstration pilot program to monitor school speed zones citywide and allows surveillance evidence to be used to impose liability for speeding.

Addabbo, who voted for the bill, said parents and school officials throughout his district have expressed concerns about speeding drivers traveling the streets in their school zones that see heavy traffic, but have inadequate traffic-calming measures.

“I know there are a number of schools in my district that face unsafe street conditions each school day. I am prepared to examine every school and every method available to ensure the safety of our schoolchildren,” he said.

P.S. 232 neighbors the bustling Lindenwood Shopping Center at 153rd Avenue and 83rd Street, and school staff wants to keep students safe around arrival and dismissal time. P.S. 207 parents similarly want to keep kids safe from the speeding drivers that zoom down its residential street.

The new law required Addabbo submit his requests to the Department of Transportation to get the two approved cameras. He also intends to work on crossing guard areas, pedestrian crosswalks, stop signs, traffic signals and speed bumps around school zones.

Through this legislation, the city can set up speed cameras in up to 20 school speed zones in each borough at any given time. Liability for violations would be imposed upon the vehicle’s owner and violations would be determined through the city Parking Violations Bureau.

The initial speed cameras installed in the borough will be rotated over time and locations may be determined based on state statistics on where crash ratings and posted speed limits versus speeds clocked were the highest.

 

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Parents, officials call for crosswalk outside Lindenwood school


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Terence M. Cullen

As students poured out of school, a crowd gathered on the corner of 153rd Avenue and 83rd Street in Lindenwood.

Passing through were parents and guardians, sometimes holding the hands of several children as they tried to cross 153rd Avenue toward the Lindenwood Shopping Center. The crossing guard shuttled people across 83rd Street, but could not stop traffic because there is no crosswalk.

Parents, teachers and community leaders rallied outside P.S. 232 on Friday, June 14. They urged the Department of Transportation (DOT) to install a crosswalk across 153rd Avenue at the corner of the school.

State Senator Joseph Addabbo, whose daughters are students there, hosted the rally.

He said the goal was to first get a crosswalk, and then get proper signs to make the intersection a little safer. He added he has also spoken to the 106th Precinct’s commanding officer, Deputy Inspector Thomas Pascale, who said a crosswalk there would increase safety

“I did have a conversation with Inspector Pascale,” Addabbo said. “He said he’s in favor of a crosswalk if they ask [...] He would want one here to allow his crossing guard to cross people.”

Community Board 10 would support a crosswalk plan if DOT were to come up with one for the street, Board chair Elizabeth Braton said.

“If DOT indicates that it’s safe from their standpoint of traffic engineering,” she said, “I don’t see any reason why the board would not support it.”

“We don’t feel safe without that crosswalk there,” said parent Lisa Neumann. “Hopefully, they’ll get our message.”
Stefanie Calise, whose son attends nearby P.S. 146 and gets dropped off at the intersection, said she nearly got hit by a car last week trying to cross the street.

Children “can’t cross that by themselves,” she said.

However, a DOT spokesperson said the intersection does not meet the criteria for a crosswalk under federal guidelines. Officials are looking into other ways to ease traffic at the intersection, the spokesperson said.

The most recent data DOT has to go by are from 2007 to 2011, when there were no injuries at the intersection.

Addabbo addressed the statistics at the rally and called for a more aggressive approach.

“Far too often, our city reacts to a bad situation,” he said. “They’ll give us statistics about not enough accidents here, not enough fatalities here. What we’re asking: let’s not be reactive, let’s be pro-active. Let’s prevent an accident.”

 

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Assemblymember Goldfeder announces Summer Reading Challenge


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Assemblymember Phillip Goldfeder

Kids can keep their minds sharp this summer with another chapter of the state Assembly’s Summer Reading Challenge.

The program looks to beat the “summer slide” in which kids may not keep up with reading while school’s out. Sponsored by Assemblymember Phillip Goldfeder, this year’s theme is “Dig into reading” for children; for tweens it’s “Beneath the Surface.”

Students can pick up materials at their local schools in the 23rd Assembly District, or at Goldfeder’s Ozone Park and Rockaway offices.

Youngsters who read with a parent for at least 15 minutes a day for 40 days through July and August get an official Assembly certificate personally delivered by their representative.

Around 250 students from P.S. 232 in Lindenwood took part in the program last summer, according to Goldfeder’s office.

Principal Lisa Josephson said students who took part last year came back in September with keen minds, ready to learn.

“Our students at P.S. 232 who do their active reading during the summer months return to school prepared,” she said. “And they get rewarded for their efforts by Assemblymember Goldfeder.”

“Learning shouldn’t stop when the last bell rings at the end of the school year,” said Goldfeder. “The Assembly’s Summer Reading Challenge offers a fun and exciting way for families to spend quality time together while parents help their children expand their imaginations and learn.”

For more information, visit www.assembly.state.ny.us/goldfeder or call 718-945-9550.

 

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New lab launched at P.S. 232


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Councilmember Eric Ulrich’s office

Dust off the test tubes and turn up the Bunsen burners.

Councilmember Eric Ulrich and P.S. 232 Principal Lisa Josephson christened the new lab, which will help students prepare for Regents exams, on Wednesday, September 19.

“This is a great investment in our children and a wonderful addition to the school,” Ulrich said.

The councilmember had secured half a million dollars in last year’s fiscal budget to restore what used to be a classroom to better help the school, according to a press release from his office.

Josephson thanked Ulrich and said he had been supportive of the school and helping it succeed.

“Councilman Ulrich has been a reliable partner of our school community and we are so grateful for his support.”

Lindenwood liquor store meets opposition


| tcullen@queenscourier.com


Concerned over its proximity to a school, many members of the Lindenwood Alliance voiced reluctance toward a proposed liquor store in the Lindenwood Shopping Center.

Members voted 20-8 against the liquor store at their August 13 meeting. The primary worry was that the store, which would be located at 82-33 153rd Avenue, would be too close to P.S. 232, which is across the street.

Along with the proximity to the school, residents said they were unsettled about unruly characters coming in and out of the store, late night hours and lewd advertising.

Residents said there were also problems with the shopping center as a whole, mainly regarding traffic. Several people said there had been accidents or incidents as a result of shoppers parking in the center’s fire lanes, and driving the opposite way on one-way streets.

The liquor store’s potential owner, Gurinder Singh, was present at the meeting with an advisor, John Springer, to hear residents’ worries and plead their case for the shop.

Springer said he had walked the distance from the school to the site and determined it to be 338 feet door to door. This, he said, is well over the minimum distance of 200 feet.

“There’s a buffer,” Springer said. “The legislature decided 200 feet was a good enough buffer.”

Regardless of the outcome, Councilmember Eric Ulrich said it was a good sign that the potential owner was interested in the community’s opinion.

“I think it’s an act of good faith on their part,” Ulrich told members.

Howard Plaza Realty, the management company for the Lindenwood Shopping Center, was represented by Catherine Napolitano and Joseph Trotta. Trotta is also a member of the Alliance. The two told members that when searching for someone to fill a vacant store, they look for a suitor who will mesh well with what is already there.

Napolitano said that the liquor store’s potential spot, which had been a bagel store, had been vacant for nearly two years as the management company looked for the right candidate.

Singh is due to appear for his liquor license on August 29, he said, and hopes that it will be approved.

P.S. 232 holds carnival


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Kindergartners all the way through eighth graders got to have some close-to-the-end of the year fun at P.S. 232 in Howard Beach last week, when their school yard was filled with bounce-houses, games and free food.

No matter what the age, students enjoyed the much anticipated carnival, said Assistant Principal Kevin Collins.

Aside from the popular bounce houses and obstacle courses, students also got free hot dogs and cold drinks and a free insulated lunch bag from the Parent-Teacher Association.

The school’s PTA, Collins said, has worked for months to make the annual carnival happen.

“This is such a nice school because the effort of our PTA and our parent volunteers made the event a complete success,” he said. “We know it’s something our students look forward to all year.”

Even students lent a helping hand so their classmates had a great time.

Collins said sixth, seventh and eighth graders in student government volunteered their day to work game booths or the refreshment stand.

Normally, grades and classes are scheduled to go for a half an hour, but because of poor weather, some classes had to go together. Regardless, Collins said, “there was enough space and time for everyone to have a great time and get something to eat.”

The PTA has already begun to organize next year’s spring carnival, he said.