Tag Archives: our lady of hope

Middle Village resident named Yankees’ All-Star Teacher


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of William Termine


Physical education teacher William Termine is an “All-Star” with his students who will be honored at the Mid-Summer Classic.

The Middle Village resident was selected as the Yankees’ All-Star Teacher and will be recognized in a ceremony before Tuesday’s All-Star Game at Target Field in Minneapolis.

The 40-year-old Queens native has loved the Bronx Bombers since he was a child.

“I became a Yankees fan because my older brother and father were Mets fans,” he said. “Being the younger son, I felt I had to be independent and go my own way.”

Termine was one of three Yankees fans who were selected as All-Star Teacher finalists, after one of his students sent in an essay nominating him and he penned his own essay, explaining how he’s helped out his school and community.

He started his education career as a paraprofessional in 1996, and since 2000 has been a physical education teacher at P.S. / I.S. 87 in Middle Village, teaching fourth through eighth-grade. 

Termine’s passion for getting children to be active goes beyond gym class.

He also teaches kids fitness classes at Vigorous Fitness Clubs on Metropolitan Avenue, and coaches soccer and softball for his 8-year-old daughter’s teams at Our Lady of Hope on Eliot Avenue.

Termine is additionally involved with CHAMPS (Cooperative, Healthy, Active, Motivated and Positive Students). He started working with the program, which brings fitness activities and sports to students outside of middle school hours, after he pledged to bring it to his own school.

“Exercise is something kids should want to do, not something they should have to do. That is my goal,” he said.

Despite all the hard work Termine has done trying to achieve that goal, he still said he was “shocked” when he was selected, through online voting, as an All-Star Teacher.

“I looked at some of the other teachers’ resumes and some of the fantastic things they were doing and felt honored to be part of that group,” he said.

Before Tuesday’s ceremony he was honored with the other two finalists at Yankee Stadium on June 17.

Termine (second from right) with Yankees manager Joe Girardi when the team honored the Yankees’ All-Star Teacher finalist at the stadium.

“It was a dream come true to meet all these players. I’ve been a Yankee fan all my life so to actually get to stand on the field, it was surreal,” he said.

As a kid he was a fan of Don Mattingly, then in the 90s it was Paul O’Neill, and today it’s Derek Jeter.

“It makes it that more special,” Termine said of being able to attend his first All-Star Game, which will be the Yankee captain’s 14th and final one.

“I’m looking forward to the whole experience,” he said. “This is a once in a lifetime thing.”

 

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Elizabeth Crowley, Craig Caruana face off in heated District 30 debate


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Liam La Guerre

The first public debate between Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley and Craig Caruana was contentious.

The competitors faced off in a heated exchange on Monday. It was marked by frequent interruptions, yelling on both sides and cheers and jeers from attending residents of District 30, which includes Maspeth, Middle Village, Richmond Hill, Ridgewood, Glendale, parts of Woodhaven and Woodside.

The debate, which The Courier co-hosted, was organized by the Juniper Park Civic Association at Our Lady of Hope in Middle Village.

The showdown exploded from the very first question, which was about the Knockdown Center, a controversial arts hall in Maspeth that has hosted parties and is seeking a liquor license.

Crowley, who is in support of the center, said it will bring jobs and arts to the community.

“Do I support good jobs? Yes. Do I support arts as an economic engine? Yes,” Crowley said. “Now my opponent you will hear opposes this, and I believe it’s because he doesn’t have the ability to think outside the box when it comes to creating jobs.”

Caruana doesn’t believe the center will be used for arts, but as a club based on past parties that it has held.

“It’s not about jobs, it’s about hipsters coming from out of the area, creating a problem…” Caruana said. “This is a club that wants to sell liquor.”

The candidates sparred on various contentious projects in the community, such as the proposed Glendale homeless shelter, truck traffic and the Maspeth Bypass, the Ridgewood Reservoir development project and increased railroad garbage.

Many general questions were asked as well, including how the candidates would improve education, traffic problems, quality of life issues and decrease crime.

Crowley, who has been the councilmember for nearly four years, choose to answer questions based on her accomplishments, while taking jabs at Caruana.

Caruana, who has no experience as an elected official, stuck to his ideas to improve the neighborhood, relying on his background as a native of Middle Village and his work at the Pentagon.

Before the debate even got started crowds of Crowley and Caruana supporters were chanting at each other outside with placards, banners and megaphones for almost 20 minutes.

 

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Residents “Flood” Our Lady of Hope to help save 6-year-old


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Alexa Altman

The little boy, beaming on the back of the fire engine in his father’s oversized uniform, stole the heart of an entire community.

Over 1,900 people registered to become bone marrow donors at a drive on Saturday, February 18 at Our Lady of Hope Catholic School in Middle Village – an effort stemming from six-year-old Colin Flood’s recent diagnosis of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL).

Volunteers came out in droves, dressed in T-shirts reading “Blasting Out Leukemia Trooper Style,” with a picture of a giant robot yielding a ray gun. On the back, in bold letters, it read, “TEAM COLIN.”

Joanne Clarke, a long-time friend of the Flood family, worked the registration table, getting potential donors signed up and instructing them on the process of bone marrow donation. Armed with charts and diagrams, Clarke told a young couple about Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Donation – a method where cells are spun out of a donor’s blood and collected before the blood is returned back to the donor.

“Hopefully we can find Colin a donor,” said Clarke. “Hopefully something good comes out of [the drive].”

On the opposite side of the room, potential donors scraped cheek swabs along the inside of their mouths and sealed them in envelopes.

Over the next three to four weeks, DKMS — the non-profit organization that registers potential donors — will test for Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA), contained in human tissue, to see if there is a match. Donors who register with DKMS have the potential to provide life-saving materials to anyone, worldwide.

James Kirkland, a representative from DKMS, bounced around the room, greeting attendees and meeting with other volunteers. He called the experience “mind-boggling.”

“Usually good turnout for a drive is around 150, 200 people,” he said. “This is incredible.”

For those who were not able to attend the bone marrow drive but are still interested in donation, visit www.getswabbed.org. Registration is free and materials are sent from DKMS directly to your home.

 

Turkeys and trimmings delivered in Middle Village


| mchan@queenscourier.com

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Five families got an early start to a happy Thanksgiving, as turkeys complete with trimmings made their way to their front doors.
Courtesy of the newly-formed Middle Village Kiwanis Club, 30 turkeys were collected and distributed to local churches, two homes in Ridgewood and three in Middle Village on Tuesday, November 22.

“It was overwhelming and over-joyous for the families and even for myself. They were very grateful,” said Al Gentile, treasurer of Middle Village Kiwanis and chairperson of the club’s food drive committee. “We began to talk about everything under the sun — their trials and tribulations that are going on right now. They were very appreciative to get this help.”

Gentile said some of the families even tried to convince the Kiwanis Club to give the help to more needy people instead of them.
“It was just an unbelievable story. These are cancer victims, some of them are unemployed. It was very rewarding to know that they were going to get the baskets,” he said.

According to Middle Village Kiwanis boardmember J.P. Di Troia, the bulk of the birds will go toward Sacred Heart Parish’s food pantry, while others will be donated to Our Lady of Hope Parish, St. Matthias Parish and other local food drives.

“We’re Kiwanis. That’s what we’re about. We help the community and we help families — anybody in need. We’re ecstatic,” said his wife, Tina Di Troia, the first Middle Village Kiwanis president and longtime member of several Kiwanis’ in the surrounding neighborhoods.

The brand new group — which will be officially installed and chartered on December 7 — already is 29 members strong, and the numbers will only be growing, officials said.

“We’re finding that everyone is looking for us to join, to help us and to do more for the community, especially the children,” Tina said.
Middle Village Kiwanis members personally delivered the turkeys — and a basket of stuffing, cranberry sauce, canned vegetables and pudding — to the doors of families and local churches.

“It’s very exciting for all of us involved,” J.P. said.