Tag Archives: NYC

Bayside resident prepares for annual pigeon race


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Eric Jankiewicz

Xu Jun wakes up every morning at 4 a.m. and drives hundreds of miles away from his Bayside apartment with at least 70 pigeons, then lets them find their way home. He’s training his birds, known as homing pigeons, for a competition in September.

“When I was young I liked to have pigeons,” Jun said in Mandarin, speaking through translator Lisa Zhang. “It’s always been an interest of mine.”

Jun participates in various races across the northeast and he began the hobby three years ago. The World Center Memorial Race, the one Jun is currently preparing for, is hosted by the Bronx Homing Pigeon Club and takes place in late September. Each of Jun’s 101 pigeons has an individual number tag so that the race organizers can make sure nobody cheats. The organizers of the race will take Jun’s birds, along with hundreds of other contestants’ birds, to an undisclosed area where they are released. Contestants are judged based on how fast their flock comes home, according to Jun.

Jun’s birds live in a wooden nest, known as a loft, in a College Point bus repair shop. The loft serves as their home and final destination in races. Jun works for the shop and during the lulls in his work schedule he cleans the loft and feeds the birds.

Homing pigeons have two racing seasons. The first is in late September when the birds are less than a year old. The second season is in the spring and the birds are typically older by this point in their racing careers.

With the first race season approaching, Jun has been training his pigeons by taking them further and further out in New Jersey every week and then releasing them in the wild, where they will usually take several hours to fly back home.

“I just like pigeons. It’s a very simple thing for me and I enjoy it,” Jun said. That day he was particularly pleased with his birds’ athletic performance; he released 73 and all of them returned, an outcome that doesn’t always happen.

“There’s kind of a neat tradition to pigeon homing,” said Deone Roberts, who works for the American Racing Pigeon Union, an organization that’s affiliated with hundreds of pigeon clubs across the country.

“The bird’s simply enjoying flying and going home,” she said. “[The pigeon] wants to go home and be with his mate and their offspring. It makes good fun.”

Using pigeons for racing has been around in America since the late 1800s, according to Roberts’ organization. The birds, a common sight in New York City, were also used during WWII to transmit messages across enemy lines.

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Goodbye yellow brick road


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Thomas Curry

Somewhere under the asphalt, bricks are yellow.

That somewhere is in Woodhaven, where a routine repaving revealed a long-buried patch of yellow bricks.

And while this yellow brick road leads to Jamaica Avenue rather than the Emerald City,  it offers a glimpse of Belgian bricks that once covered most of Woodhaven and other parts of New York City.

Woodhaven resident Thomas Curry noticed that yellow bricks were peeking out of 88th Street near Park Lane South in June.

“When they ripped up the streets to repave last week – they revealed the old Belgian Blocks that the streets in Woodhaven once had,” he wrote on Facebook. “Follow the yellow brick road.”

According to Forgotten New York, a blog about New York City’s history, these bricks were used for many streets before blacktop roads substituted them in the 1940s. The bricks can still be found in places like DUMBO and the South Street Seaport.

In a picture taken during the 1940s of Schmidt’s Candy Shop, which is still around, Belgian blocks can be seen on Jamaica Avenue with trolley car tracks.

“All of Woodhaven used to be covered in those bricks. I wish it was like that now,” said Ed Wendell, president of the Woodhaven Historical and Cultural Society. “Or that they could be kept somehow. But then I guess bricks like that pose their own problem especially in the winter when you try to plow the area.”

Wendell said he saw the yellow bricks and noted that every so often the tornado of progress reveals Woodhaven’s history.

“The best is when a business closes and a new owner takes the building and removes the awning of the old business,” he said. “That’s when you get to see the original signage of whatever the building originally was and for a second Woodhaven is taken back to an earlier time.”


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City fills more than 21,000 potholes in Queens


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

More than 21,000 pesky potholes in Queens have been filled so far during this year’s snowier than usual winter, the city’s Department of Transportation (DOT) said.

Nearly 2,000 in the borough were fixed last weekend, as part of the city’s season-long repair efforts, a department spokesperson said.

Since January, the 1,000-member roadway crew has set a record pace, working around the clock to fix more than 75,000 potholes along the city’s rocky roads, DOT Commissioner Polly Trottenberg said.

“These tireless public servants … will be filling many more given the snowstorms the city has already faced this winter, and the wear and tear that inflicts,” Trottenberg said.

Potholes typically pop up around February and die down by April, though the timeline is dependent on weather, experts say.

They form when water, that slips into cracks under the road, freezes and expands when the temperature changes, causing a freeze and thaw cycle that damages the road.

It becomes a hole when heavy traffic rolls over the weakened spot.

“It’s crazy, especially now after all the snow. Forget about it,” said Jose Soto, who drives from Flushing to Astoria. “It ruins your tires. You can get in an accident. It’s annoying. You have to zigzag.”

It typically takes a few minutes for crews to fill, compact and seal a pothole, a DOT spokesperson said.

More work is expected to be done next week on residential streets and major roadways, including the Long Island Expressway’s (LIE) eastbound service road, between Little Neck Parkway and the Nassau County border, and 149th Street at 27th Avenue in Linden Hill, the DOT said.

“It’s like a minefield on the LIE,” said driver Risa Doherty, who commutes from Roslyn in Nassau County to Bayside. “Cars are swerving around the potholes at high speeds.”

To report a pothole, call 3-1-1 or visit nyc.gov.

Craters generally have to be at least one foot in diameter and three inches deep to be fixed, according to the DOT’s website.

 

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Deadline to join or continue on Queens community boards approaches


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Civic-minded Queens residents looking to shape their neighborhoods have until this Friday to apply to join one of the borough’s 14 community boards.

Borough President Melinda Katz has extended the deadline for those applying to be a new or returning community board member to Feb. 7, due to a snowier-than-usual January.

Community boards, which have up to 50 sitting members, advise city agencies on zoning, land use and community issues. The eyes and ears of the neighborhoods also make city budget and state liquor licensing recommendations.

“They play a significant role in helping city government address the needs of its residents,” Katz said. “Service on a community board is a great way to contribute to the well-being and quality of life of your neighborhood.”

Board members, appointed by the borough president or nominated by their district’s councilmember, serve for two years. The new term begins April 1.

Applications are available here. For more information, call 718-286-2900.

For a list of Queens community boards, click here.

 

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Hercules flexing his muscles in first storm of 2014


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File photo

Updated Friday, January 3, 7:05 a.m.

The year is starting out with a shot of nasty weather that is predicted to bring near-blizzard conditions to the city.

Governor Andrew Cuomo declared a statewide state of emergency Thursday afternoon to prepare officials for winter storm Hercules, which is forecasted to bring five to nine inches of snow to the city.

“To ensure an effective and rapid response to this winter storm, I am declaring a statewide state of emergency, so resources can get to communities where they are needed as quickly as possible,” he said.

The National Weather Service (NWS) has issued a winter storm warning until 1 p.m. Friday.

Cuomo also announced the Long Island Expressway will be closed from midnight to 8 a.m. on Friday from the Queens/Nassau County border and east. The Northern State Parkway and all MTA bridges and tunnels will remain open.

“As this winter storm unfolds, bringing heavy snow and high winds to many parts of the state, I strongly urge all New Yorkers to exercise caution, avoid travel and stay indoors,” he said.

Mayor Bill de Blasio emphasized the “forecast could change at any moment.”

“That’s why it’s so important for everyone to pay close attention to updates in the coming hours,” he said at his administration’s first press conference Thursday evening.

Alternate side parking has been suspended Friday to facilitate with snow removal, but payment at parking meters remains in effect.

All express subway service will run local for the start of the morning rush hour, until all stored trains are moved from the express tracks. Riders should expect delays on city buses due to the weather. The Long Island Rail Road is operating on a weekend schedule effective 12:01 a.m. Friday. The Metro-North is running on a reduced schedule after 8  p.m. Thursday, and a Saturday schedule on Friday. To see any additional MTA service changes, click here.

The weather is also affecting air travel. All flights at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) were suspended as of about 6:12 a.m., but the airport will remain open. Flights could resume in a couple of hours, said the FAA. Thousands of flights have reportedly been canceled across the country Friday, and travelers are urged to check with their carriers before heading to the airport.

City officials have no plan to close specific streets yet, but will monitor that need as the storm progresses, de Blasio said.

The City of New York Department of Sanitation (DSNY) has put 2,300 workers on 12-hour shifts, and 1,700 trucks with snow plows will be deployed once two inches of snow hit the ground. To track the progress of DSNY clearing operations throughout the five boroughs, click here.

Kew Gardens and South Ozone Park had accumulated more than 5 inches of snow as of 4 a.m., according to NWS.

Senior centers throughout the city will be closed through Friday, and de Blasio urged city residents to keep a close eye on the homeless population.

Joe Bruno, the Office of Emergency Management (OEM) commissioner, said the NYPD, FDNY, EMS and other emergency officials will “work around the clock until this is over.”

OEM has issued a hazardous travel advisory for Friday, and is warning motorists to drive slowly, monitor weather and traffic, use major streets or highways, and have the name and number of at least one local towing service.

Temperatures will be blustery, with a high Friday of 17 and low around 8. Wind chill, however, could make the weather feel as cold as 10 below zero, de Blasio said.

Borough residents hit grocery stores and gas stations Thursday afternoon to prepare for the impending storm. People were piling into the Waldbaums on Francis Lewis Boulevard just “picking up extras,” but said “the crazies” would be sure to clear the shelves in the hours to come.

“I’m getting extras just in case,” said Anita Oberwiler, who anticipated frantic shoppers to come rushing through as the afternoon pressed on.

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Thursday: Cloudy. Light snow likely this afternoon. Temps nearly steady around 30. Winds NE at 15 to 25 mph. Chance of snow 40%. Thursday night: Periods of snow. Low 16. Winds NNE at 20 to 30 mph. Chance of snow 90%. 5 to 8 inches of snow expected.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Pop Americano!

From the creators of “Comedy Outliers” comes “Pop Americano!” a fun, interactive show where a panel of comedians breakdown current pop culture and political news. Propelled by it’s use of news clips, sound bites and a quick round of pop culture trivia, “Pop Americano” is a show you can’t miss! 10 p.m. at The Creek and the Cave in Long Island City. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Storm bringing near-blizzard conditions to NYC

The year is starting out with a shot of nasty weather that is predicted to bring near-blizzard conditions to the city. Read more: The Queens Courier

NYPD: Queens shooting is city’s first murder of 2014

A man shot to death in Jamaica Wednesday is the first homicide of the year, police said. Read more: The Queens Courier

De Blasio sworn in as 109th mayor of New York City

New York City’s 109th mayor, Bill de Blasio, was sworn in during a ceremony at his Park Slope, Brooklyn home just after midnight Wednesday, followed by a formal inauguration on the steps of City Hall later that day. Read more: The Queens Courier

Freed ailing ex-terror trial lawyer arrives in NYC

A dying former civil rights lawyer convicted in a terrorism case but released early from prison has arrived in New York City. Read more: AP

Three Rangers named to U.S. Olympic squad

The New York Rangers will be well-represented at the 2014 Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia, at least as far the U.S. Men’s Hockey team is concerned. Read more: ABC New York

 

 

NYC murders, shootings reach record lows


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYC Mayor’s Office

Mayor Michael Bloomberg is leaving office with the fewest murders and shootings in recorded city history.

He made the announcement Friday along with NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly at the graduation ceremony for 1,171 new police officers at Madison Square Garden.

“New York’s crime-fighting strategies have made us America’s safest big city – and one that cities across the globe want to learn from,” said Bloomberg. “Twelve years ago, no one thought New York’s crime rate could go any lower. But it did.”

There have been 332 homicides so far in 2013, down 20 percent from the previous record low, set last year, according to the mayor. Murders have dropped 32 percent since 2001, when he was elected.

In Queens, there were 1,374 fewer homicides between 2002 and December 20 of this year than during the 12 years prior to that period.

Shootings have declined by 20 percent from 2012’s record low, with 1,093 shootings through Thursday, December 26, and have dropped by 32 percent since 2001.

The city began recording homicide numbers in 1963, when there were 548 murders. The homicide rate peaked in 1990 with 2,245 deaths, according to Police Department stats.

Shootings statistics were first recorded with the introduction of NYPD’s Compstat crime reporting system in 1994, according to the mayor.

Crime in schools and on the subway has also seen significant drops in recent years.

Major crimes in schools are down 56 percent and violent crime has decreased 55 percent since 2001.

In 1990, there were 50 crimes per day on the subway, and only 7.1 crimes per day in 2013.

The mayor said the crime drop could not be attributed to putting more people in prison, since incarceration rates have decreased since 2001.

Policing strategies, such as Operation Impact, which pairs rookie and veteran officers to “flood high-crime zones” and Operation Crew Cut, an initiative combating loosely affiliated gangs, helped keep the shooting and murder rates down, the mayor said.

 

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60 Queens polling sites to have Bengali translations


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Ballots at 60 Queens polling sites this year will have Bengali translations, officials said, but advocates for South Asian voters are skeptical the move will crystallize.

“Our concern is that we were told in the past that Bengali ballots would be available, particularly for the November general election, and that did not happen,” said attorney Jerry Vattamala of the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF).

“We took their word and we sort of got burned,” he added. “Enough is enough.”

A group of South Asian proponents of Bengali ballots filed a lawsuit against the city’s Board of Elections (BOE) on July 2 for its failure, despite assurances, to provide adequate bilingual language assistance in four elections since April 2012.

“We tried to work with them, but then we came to an understanding they weren’t going to do it,” Vattamala said. “We just want something legally enforceable — written confirmation that Bengali will in fact be on the ballot for the next election.”

AALDEF represents the suit’s three plaintiffs, who say the BOE has not complied with the Voting Rights Act of 1965. They argue that the law requires the city to provide election information and language assistance to South Asian minorities.

Parts of Queens have been covered under a provision of the act since October 13, 2011.

“You would think it wouldn’t have to come to a lawsuit,” Vattamala said. “But these things are very reasonable, what we’re asking for.”

BOE spokesperson Valerie Vazquez confirmed the borough would have, for the first time, Bengali language assistance for the September 10 primary and November general elections this year.

The 60 polling sites are located mostly in southern Queens near John F. Kennedy International Airport and near Sunnyside, Woodside, Jackson Heights, Elmhurt and Bellerose.

Depending on the number of voters with limited English proficiency in those areas, some of them could also have Hindi or Hindi-Punjabi interpreters.

“It was always our intention to be in full compliance for the 2013 election cycle,” Vazquez said.

Bengali translations were never promised for 2012 elections, Vazquez said, because ballot vendors needed to make technical modifications to the system.

As an interim plan, the board hired full-time staff interpreters and provided a translated candidates list at each polling site in the covered areas, the BOE said.

Supporters of the change are now cautiously optimistic, but agree it is a “tremendous step forward.”

“It’s bringing democracy to more people in Queens,” said John Prakash Albert, board chair of Taking Our Seat, a nonprofit group aimed at empowering South Asians voters.

State Senator Toby Ann Stavisky — who co-sponsored legislation that would require the BOE to provide written Bengali, Punjabi and Hindi language assistance — said implementing Bengali ballots “will have a direct and measurably positive impact on the lives of our neighbors.”

The bill was introduced in the state legislature last year, but never moved out of the Senate’s Elections Committee.

One of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit, Mazeda Uddin, the national women’s chair for the Alliance of South Asian American Labor, said the elections board is “still lacking.”

“They’re not giving us everything,” she said.

Advocates are seeking binding confirmation from the BOE, a formal Bengali language assistance compliance plan and an agreement to meet with a Bengali language advisory group.

“Last election, they promised me,” Uddin said. “This is the most important for our community. Our people can’t choose the right candidate for lack of access. So many voters can’t vote.”

 

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New York City gets unique .nyc web address


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

ROSA KIM 

New York City is out to conquer the digital world.

City officials announced a .nyc web address for New Yorkers and businesses on Tuesday.

“Having our own unique, top-level domain puts NYC at the forefront of the digital landscape and creates new opportunities for our small businesses,” said Mayor Michael Bloomberg. “They’ll now be able to identify themselves as connected to NYC, one of the world’s strongest and most prestigious brands.”

NYC is one of the first cities in the world to be granted a geographic top-level domain by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the nonprofit private organization responsible for overseeing the distribution of IP addresses and domain names. With .nyc, ICANN expands on already existing domains such as .com, .org and .edu.

Officials believe that the introduction of .nyc will allow businesses to identify their local roots and lead to a burst in economic activity.

“Small businesses benefit from a strong online presence, and the .nyc domain will give NYC’s small businesses an extra boost by making them more accessible and allowing them to build off the NYC brand,” said Small Business Services Commissioner Robert Walsh.

In order to register for a .nyc domain, registrants will have to have a primary place of residence in NYC with a physical address or a “bona fide presence” in the city, meaning regularly performing lawful activities within the city and maintaining an office or other facility in the city. Registration for .nyc addresses will open in late 2013 and fees are to be determined.

More information is available on mydotnyc.com.

 

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Pols want to speed up bike share expansion in western Queens


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Cristabelle Tumola

With the much-anticipated Citi Bike Share scheduled to begin by the end of the month, local politicians are calling on the Department of Transportation (DOT) to speed up expansion into western Queens.

On May 9, DOT set the Citi Bike Share’s start for the week of Memorial Day for annual members who sign up by May 17. The program is slated to open to daily and weekly members on June 2.

The program, which is operated by NYC Bike Share, will offer specially designed, durable bikes at docking stations around the city. Members can rent the bikes with special keys. They be available 24 hours a day year-round for 30 to 45 minutes at a go depending on the user’s membership plan.

The DOT plans to set up bike stations in Long Island City and Sunnyside within the year. Those are the only parts of the borough currently set to be covered by Citi Bike Share.

“Our community has worked for years to make western Queens more bike-friendly, and our efforts have been largely successful,” said Senator Michael Gianaris. “I am pleased to see that Long Island City is included in future plans, and I hope that the program will be quickly expanded to more western Queens neighborhoods.”

In recent years, western Queens has been the recipient of many bike-related amenities. Queensboro Bridge now features improved bike access. Also, developments like the Queens East River and North Shore Greenway have delivered transportation alternatives to and from Manhattan and Brooklyn.

Gianaris and Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer will continue to work with DOT, Citi Bike Share and local groups to speed up the process of bringing bike stations to Long Island City and the rest of western Queens.

“While we are initially placing the stations in the densest contiguous parts of the city that would generate the most use of the bikes, there will be a chance to expand in the future based on demand and resources,” said DOT spokesperson Scott Gastel.

You can find a map of stations included in the current plan at citibikenyc.com/stations.

 

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Evacuation centers in Queens


| brennison@queenscourier.com

The mayor has already ordered the mandatory evacuations of vulnerable areas in Queens ahead of Hurricane Sandy, and others may want to head to an evacuation center just to be safe.

Here are the 16 evacuation centers in Queens:

• John Adams High School- 101-01 Rockaway Blvd., Ozone Park.

• Grover Cleveland High School- 21-27 Hinrod Street, Ridgewood

• Aviation High School- 45-30 36th Street

• Bayside High School- 32-24 Corp. Kennedy Boulevard

• Belmont Racetrack- Hempstead Turnpike and Cross Island Parkway

• Flushing High School- 35-01 Union Street

• Forest Hills High School- 67-01 110th Street

• J.H.S. 185- 147-26 25th Drive

• Hillcrest High School- 160-05 Highland Avenue

• Newcomers High School- 28-01 41st Avenue

• Newtown High School- 48-01 90th Street

• P.S. 19- 98-02 Roosevelt Avenue

• Queens College- 65-30 Kissena Boulevard

• Queensborough Community College- 222-05 56th Avenue

• William C. Bryant High School- 48-10 31st Avenue

• York College- 94-20 Guy R. Brewer Boulevard

High school football roundup


| hzwillenberg@queenscourier.com

The John Adams Spartans (2-2) dropped to ninth place in the Championship Division after losing at home to the Harry S. Truman Mustangs (2-2) by a score of 36-16.  Offensively, the Spartans were led by junior Eldridge Edens. The starting quarterback completed 12 out of 20 passes, throwing for 132 yards, a touchdown and an interception. On the ground, Edens rushed for 72 yards on 11 attempts, while crossing the goal line twice. Adams was never able to climb out of a 16-0 hole, as the defense struggled on the day. The Spartans allowed the Mustangs to amass 255 yards on offense including 193 yards rushing. Junior Giovahn Watson led the Mustangs with 91 yards rushing on 17 attempts, scoring once. Senior Hamed Dembele rushed for 69 yards on 5 attempts, while scoring two touchdowns. Junior Armani Williams added 25 yards of his own on five attempts with a touchdown. Next up for the Spartans will be the John F. Kennedy Campus Knights (2-2).

The Knights beat the Canarsie Educational Campus Chiefs (1-3) by a score of 34-32. The Knights ran for 285 yards against the Chiefs. Senior Mathew Evora led the Knights with 135 yards on 18 attempts while scoring a touchdown. Junior Anthony Cruz added 100 yards on 13 attempts, while scoring two touchdowns.

The Campus Magnet Bull-Dogs (3-1) beat the Dewitt Clinton Governors (1-3) by a score of 26-22. The Bull-Dogs had a total of 424 yards. Junior Blessuan Austin completed five out of nine passes, throwing for 160 yards and a touchdown. Senior Asaikie Blake led the Bull-Dogs with 219 yards rushing on 21 attempts, while scoring one touchdown. Austin also added two touchdowns on the ground. Next up for the Bull-Dogs will be the Port Richmond Red Raiders (3-1). The Bull-Dogs will have to stop a Red Raiders team which has won three in a row. The name of the game for the Red Raiders is rushing. Out of the 466 total offensive yards amassed by Port Richmond 348 was rushing. Senior Mario Villafane rushed for 218 yards on 18 attempts and scored three touchdowns.

In the Bowl Division the Bayside Commodores dropped to 2-2 with a loss to the James Madison Knights (4-0) by a score of 22-21. Senior George Wallace led the Commodores, rushing for 65 yards on two attempts, crossing the goal line twice. Senior Julian Moody completed the only pass he threw on the day, the pass going for 60 yards and a score. The Knights were led by sophomore Daniel Martinez who completed eight of 22 passes for 103 yards and two touchdowns. Next up for the Commodores will be the Tilden Educational Blue Devils (2-2).

Gas prices down slightly in New York City


| brennison@queenscourier.com

File photo

While gas prices are down slightly from their 2012 highs, drivers are still paying 32 cents more per gallon than at this time a year ago.

The average price for a gallon of gas in the city is $4.19, according to AAA’s Fuel Gauge Report, four cents lower than two weeks ago.

Over the past month the cost of gas is up 7 cents.

Last year, city drivers were paying $3.87 per gallon.  Prices passed the $4 in mid-August and have remained there since.

Nationally, the average has begun to fall. A gallon of gas nationally is $3.78, four cents lower than a month ago.

 

Mayor unveils most popular baby names in New York City


| brennison@queenscourier.com

mom and baby-face to face

Jayden is the new Michael in New York City.

For the fourth consecutive year, Jayden topped the list of the most popular boys’ names in New York City. The top girls’ name in the city in 2011 was Isabella for the third straight year.

Michael, the most popular name in the city between 1980 and 2006, ended up fifth on the list.

Isabella Pal and Jayden Alexander Marthone, both born in the city last year, flanked Mayor Michael Bloomberg during the announcement this morning and took home some gifts: a “Made in NY” T-shirt and a New York City bib.

“A baby born in New York City has a life expectancy 2.5 years longer than the national average, in no small part due to our bold public health initiatives,” said Bloomberg. “This means we can expect to see many of the very popularly named Isabellas and Jaydens – like these two little ones with us today – more than 80 years from now.”

Among the top 10 girls’ names, nine repeated from 2010, while eight were the same among boys, though in a slightly altered order.  Aiden and Alexander joined the boys’ top 10 and the girls’ added Sofia — a variation of the number two girls’ name Sophia.

The number of babies born in New York City dipped slightly from 2010 to 2011, down 1.4 percent from 124,791 to 123,029 (62,808 boys and 60,221 girls), according to the mayor’s office.

The rest of the boys’ top 10 included: Jacob, Ethan, Daniel, Michael, Matthew, Justin, David, Aiden and Alexander.  The girls’ list was rounded out with: Sophia, Olivia, Emma, Mia, Emily, Madison, Leah, Chloe and Sofia.

NYPD cop busted for providing info to drug traffickers: feds


| jlane@queenscourier.com

An NYPD officer was arrested this morning by federal agents and charged with allegedly providing inside police intelligence and information about fellow cops to a drug trafficking organization.

Devon Daniels, 30, was arrested by the Drug Enforcement Administration and NYPD Internal Affairs detectives and is scheduled to be arraigned today in Brooklyn federal court.

Daniels has been charged with illegally accessing the NYPD’s computer database to provide restricted information to a drug trafficking organization with both Midwestern and New York City connections, officials said.
[New York Post]