Tag Archives: nyc mayor’s race

De Blasio elected mayor in landslide


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo by Lauren Epifanio

Bill de Blasio, in a landslide victory, has been elected as the city’s first Democratic mayor in two decades.

With 99 percent of the precincts reporting, de Blasio won Tuesday’s race with 73 percent of the vote, according to unofficial results. His Republican opponent, Joe Lhota, had 24 percent.

“Today, you spoke out loudly and clearly for a new direction for our city, united by a belief that our city should leave no New Yorker behind,” de Blasio said in his victory speech.

“Tackling inequality isn’t easy; it never has been and it never will be. The challenges we face have been decades in the making, and the problems we set out to address will not be solved overnight,” he added.

“But make no mistake: the people of this city have chosen a progressive path, and tonight we set forth on it, together, as one city.”

As far back as late June, polls still showed de Blasio, the city’s public advocate, finishing fourth in the Democratic primary.

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn was the early front-runner, but when former Congressmember Anthony Weiner entered the Democratic primary in May, her lead shrunk in the polls.

Weiner, however, soon faced another sexting scandal, and he lost favorability with voters.

In July, de Blasio started to gain in the polls, and took the lead away from Quinn the following month.

De Blasio’s surge in the polls coincided with the release of a campaign ad starring his teenage son Dante, whose Afro took center stage.

His momentum continued until the primary, where de Blasio beat second-place finisher, former City Comptroller Bill Thompson by a significant lead.

But, with de Blasio still hovering around the 40 percent threshold needed to avoid an October 1 runoff, Thompson would not concede on primary night.

Thompson dropped out of the race six days later, and in late September the Board of Elections certified de Blasio the official Democratic nominee with just over 40 percent.

Lhota, the ex-MTA chairman and former deputy mayor under Rudy Giuliani, easily secured the Republican nomination with 53 percent of the vote, topping grocery store mogul John Catsimatidis and Doe Fund founder George McDonald.

But Lhota’s success within his own party could not be replicated in the general election.

“We are five boroughs, but we are one city. We are one people and we want our city to move forward, not backwards. And I do hope our mayor-elect understands this before it’s too late,” said Lhota, conceding the race.

“It’s natural tonight to feel some disappointment. But tomorrow we must move beyond it. It was a good fight and it was a fight worth having,” he continued.

With a heavy Democratic electorate in the city, early on polls showed de Blasio beating Lhota by a wide margin.

The heated battle between the two and their different visions for the city were evident throughout the general election campaign and the three debates between the candidates, where they clashed on a range of issues, including taxes, education and crime.

Though Lhota promised a safer city under his watch, suggesting crime would go up under a de Blasio administration, voters ultimately favored de Blasio’s progressive message and saw him as a break from the Bloomberg years.

-With additional reporting by Meaghan McGoldrick

Updated 2:12 a.m. 

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


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morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Monday: Partly cloudy. High of 48. Winds from the NE at 5 to 15 mph. Monday night: Overcast in the evening, then partly cloudy. Low of 41. Winds from the ENE at 5 to 10 mph

EVENT OF THE DAY:  Sunnyside Restaurant Week

The Sunnyside Shines Business Improvement District (BID) is holding its first-ever Sunnyside Restaurant Week from November 4 to 8. The five-day celebration will offer participants a “culinary journey through Sunnyside,” featuring special three course dinner menus for $25 at 17 participating local restaurants. Six of the 17 will also feature two course lunch menus for $10. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

NYC Marathon returns amid increased security; Mutai, Jeptoo of Kenya win titles

A year after it was canceled at the last minute by Hurricane Sandy, more than 50,000 runners participated in the 43rd running of the New York City Marathon, taking on the 26.2 miles through the five boroughs. Read more: NBC New York

Bill de Blasio, ahead in poll, dismisses Joe Lhota’s attacks on sleeping late

As a new poll showed his mayoral dreams slipping away, Joe Lhota launched a novel attack, charging that Bill de Blasio’s inability to get up in the morning shows he’s unfit to lead the city that never sleeps. Read more: New York Daily News

Barclays Center accused in lawsuit of mistreatment based on race

The Barclays Center has been accused of mistreating luxury box holders who are African-American. Read more: CBS New York

Lhota slams Harry Belafonte for ‘race baiting’ comments

Mayoral candidates Bill de Blasio and Joe Lhota each hit the campaign trail Sunday with several events around the city. Read more: CBS New York

Missing NYU student found trapped between wall of dorm, parking garage

A 19-year-old New York University student who went missing over the weekend was found trapped in a narrow gap between a dorm and a neighboring parking garage in lower Manhattan, where rescuers had to break through a wall Sunday night to free him. Read more: NBC New York

Gunman in LAX shooting told police he acted alone

The gunman accused of shooting employees and terrorizing travelers at Los Angeles International Airport accomplished two of his goals: kill a Transportation Security Administration officer and show how easy it is to get a gun into an airport. Read more: AP

The Queens Courier endorses Bill de Blasio for mayor


| editorial@queenscourier.com

File photo

The Queens Courier is pleased to endorse Democrat Bill de Blasio for mayor of New York.

Since taking office, de Blasio has stood for the interests of the middle and working classes, pushing for better public schools, protesting the closure of community hospitals, and generally advocating for a city government more responsive to the needs of outer borough residents.

So when you go to the polls, be sure to cast your vote for Bill de Blasio.

Lhota gets quiet backing from Queens GOP


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Joe Lhota has the support of the Queens County Republican Party, but the mayoral candidate may not have wanted a public endorsement announcement to be made.

According to a source, reported Crain’s New York Business, Lhota didn’t hold an endorsement press conference and asked the party not to issue a press release on the backing because his “camp did not want to highlight dissension in the Queens Republican Party and in other Republican circles by publicizing the endorsement.”

Queens GOP first vice chairman James McClelland said it was a question of “exactly how to roll out the endorsement” because Lhota’s schedule was so tight and “how the press release should be worded.”

The party sent The Courier the following statement from Chairman Phil Ragusa endorsing Lhota for mayor, which according to McClelland, was issued on Tuesday, October 22.

“As the Chairman of the Queens Republican Party, I am proud to announce our endorsement of Joe Lhota for Mayor. Joe is the only candidate who will preserve the gains we have seen over the last 20 years in safety, the economy and quality of life for all New Yorkers.  People should never forget what life was like throughout this city prior to 1994 when criminals held neighborhoods hostage and people were scared to leave their homes. We need Joe Lhota to lead this city through the challenging economic times ahead and we need a chief executive who is willing to make the difficult decisions to ensure New York remains the greatest city in the world. Queens Republicans will do whatever it takes to help Joe Lhota win this race to keep New York City the shining city it has become.”

Lhota spokesperson Jessica Proud also said the campaign “didn’t have time to do a press conference.” Proud said she did not know anything about the press release.

“We are happy to have the support of Queens Republicans,” she said.

 

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De Blasio maintains wide lead in latest poll


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File photos

The newest Quinnipiac University poll shows Democrat Bill de Blasio still has a commanding lead over his Republican opponent Joe Lhota in the mayor’s race.

The poll found that De Blasio tops Lhota 68 to 24 percent among likely voters. Independence candidate Adolfo Carrion received 2 percent in the survey.

Lhota improved slightly since the last Quinnipiac University poll, released on October 3, which showed de Blasio with a 71 to 21 percent lead over him.

But with only two weeks to go until Election Day, the poll also found that only 5 percent of likely voters are still undecided. Eight percent of voters who named a candidate said there’s a “good chance” they will change their mind by November 5.

“The good news for Public Advocate Bill de Blasio is that he probably can start drafting is inauguration speech,” said Maurice Carroll, director of the Quinnipiac University Polling  Institute.

“The bad news is that New York City voters’ priority for the next mayor is – you guessed it – jobs, something over which a mayor has very little control. The next priority is education and if he can succeed where so many have not, they can name a school after him.”

According to the poll, released Monday, 32 percent of likely voters said creating jobs is the top priority for the next mayor, followed by education at 24 percent, keeping crime rates low at 20 percent and reducing the gap between the rich and poor at 18 percent.

The poll, conducted from October 16 to 20, surveyed 973 likely voters and had a margin of error of plus and minus 3.1 percentage points.

On October 15, de Blasio and Lhota faced each other in their first general election mayoral debate. The following day, Lhota released a new campaign ad highlighting his Democratic opponent’s “weak positions on crime.”

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


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The Queens Morning Roundup logo.

TODAY’S FORECAST

Tuesday: Overcast. High of 68. Winds from the West at 10 to 15 mph. Tuesday night: Partly cloudy with a chance of rain after midnight. Low of 48. Winds from the NW at 5 to 10 mph shifting to the North after midnight. Chance of rain 50%.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Quality-of-Life Town Hall with Assemblymemeber Francisco Moya and the Jackson Heights Green Alliance

Assemblymember Francisco Moya and the Jackson Heights Green Alliance will host a Town Hall featuring a panel comprised of representatives from an array of city agencies, state agencies and community groups. The event will provide Jackson Heights residents with the opportunity to address these representatives on a wide range of issues and discuss ways in which quality of life in the community can be improved. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Joe Lhota, Bill de Blasio square off in 2nd NYC mayoral debate

Facing a massive deficit in the polls, Joe Lhota plans to be on the attack in the second New York City mayoral debate, which doubles as one of his last chances to start a comeback that could topple front-runner Bill de Blasio. Read more: NBC New York

MTA considers bendable trains that connect without interior doors, making it easier to find a seat

The MTA will consider subway trains that connect without interior doors, making it easier for riders to move from car to car in search of seats. Read more: New York Daily News

Baby Hope’ murder suspect due in court

The man charged with second-degree murder in the Baby Hope case will appear in court Tuesday. Read more: ABC New York

Mayor Michael Bloomberg wins ‘Jewish Nobel’ prize

Israel on Monday recognized New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg as the first recipient of the $1 million Genesis Prize, an award popularly dubbed the “Jewish Nobel Prize.” Read more: Fox New York

Builders of Obama’s health website saw red flags

Crammed into conference rooms with pizza for dinner, some programmers building the Obama administration’s showcase health insurance website were growing increasingly stressed. Read more: AP

De Blasio, Lhota face off in their first general election debate


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

File photos

Mayoral opponents Bill de Blasio and Joe Lhota met in their first debate of the general election Tuesday night.

De Blasio, the Democratic candidate and front-runner, spent much of the Tuesday, October 15 televised debate trying to tie Lhota to national Republicans and the Tea Party.

“I think Mr. Lhota should be straight up with us about the fact that he does subscribe to the views of the national Republican Party,” said de Blasio, who mentioned Lhota’s attendance at a Staten Island Tea Party event and support of delaying Obamacare for a year.

“Don’t lump me in with people who I’m constantly in disagreement with,” said Lhota, defending himself at one point.

Lhota, who was deputy mayor under Mayor Rudy Giuliani and headed up the MTA, took aim at de Blasio by saying he has the direct management experience to be mayor.

“I can be mayor on day one without any training, without any learning curve whatsoever, said Lhota.

Though both candidates expressed a desire to change the direction of the city and agreed on some basic points, including creating more affordable housing, they were divided on many of the issues.

Among the topics covered were charter schools, crime and stop-and-frisk, the government shutdown, job creation and narrowing the income gap.

De Blasio spoke about his “Tale of Two Cites,” saying 46 percent of residents are living at or near the poverty the level, and his desire to tax the wealthy. He wants to use the tax increase to expand after-school programs and create universal pre-K.

Lhota called de Blasio a typical “career politician” who says he’s going to raise taxes on the wealthy, but will end up also raising them on the middle class. Lhota added that de Blasio voting twice to increase property taxes when he was on the City Council and other parts of his record were proof of him “going back and taking money away from the middle class.”

The two candidates will debate again on October 22 and 29.

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Monday: Partly cloudy. High of 68. Winds from the East at 5 to 10 mph. Monday night: Clear in the evening, then partly cloudy. Low of 59. Winds from the East at 5 to 10 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Raiders of the Lost Ark

Come by the Museum of the Moving Image at 2 p.m. for a screening of “Raiders of the Lost Ark.” ​Free with museum admission on a first-come, first-served basis. Museum members may ​​reserve tickets in advance by calling 718-777-6800. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Statue of Liberty reopens, ending wait for tourists 

The federal government may still be partially closed, but the Statue of Liberty isn’t. Read more: CBS New York/AP

 Charter schools get green light — for now

The city’s Department of Education is giving the green light to open or expand 23 charter schools before Mayor Bloomberg leaves office and provide them with free space in city buildings. Read more: New York Post

Bill de Blasio slams Joe Lhota tax plan as a $2B giveaway to the rich

Corporations and wealthy individuals would gain more than $2 billion in tax breaks under Joe Lhota’s economic plan, Bill de Blasio said Sunday. Read more: New York Daily News

Baby Hope’s real name added to headstone after arrest

With word of an arrest in the long-cold Baby Hope case, local media report the victim’s name has been added to her headstone: Anjelica Castillo. Read more: ABC New York

Default looming on Day 14 of shutdown, no solution

The United States moved perilously closer to an economy-rattling default and a partial government shutdown entered its third week as Senate Democratic and Republican leaders remained at odds over spending in their last-ditch negotiations to end the crises gripping the nation. Read more: AP

Political Roundup: Schumer backs Vallone


| editorial@queenscourier.com

ROUNDUP

Senator Schumer endorses Paul Vallone 

U.S. Senator Charles Schumer endorsed City Council candidate Paul Vallone for the District 19 seat on Monday.

“I have known the Vallone family for decades and their respected name and commitment to public service have made the people of Queens proud to call them their own,” Schumer said.

Vallone was recently endorsed by former Congressmember Gary Ackerman.

He faces Republican challenger Dennis Saffran in the November general election.

 

HEADLINES FROM AROUND THE WEB

Lhota, de Blasio speak on stop-and-frisk ruling appeal

A group of elected officials spoke out Monday against the city’s legal challenge to the recent stop-and-frisk lawsuit ruling. Read more: CBS New York

Obama says he expects Congress will raise debt ceiling before deadline

President Barack Obama said he does not expect to have to take any unusual steps to prevent the United States from defaulting on its debt because he believes Congress will raise the debt ceiling before a looming October 17 deadline. Read more: Reuters

Cuomo freezes new state contracts involving the Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty

The Cuomo administration is putting a hold on new state contracts involving the Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty, whose CEO was recently fired and charged with stealing funds, the Daily News has learned. Read more: New York Daily News

Joe Lhota plans to push more funding for the city buses and subways

Mayoral candidate Joe Lhota says he will boost city funding for the bus and subway network he ran as chairman of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Read more: New York Daily News

Supreme Court term begins amid government shutdown

The Supreme Court is opening for business in the midst of a partial government shutdown. Read more: AP

Political Roundup: Another poll shows strong voter support for de Blasio


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

ROUNDUP

HEADLINES FROM AROUND THE WEB

Poll finds support for de Blasio, if not all his ideas

New York City voters want to keep Raymond W. Kelly as police commissioner. They want more charter schools. And nearly half of them support the Police Department’s use of the stop-and-frisk tactic. Read more: New York Times

Obama: No shutdown talks “with a gun held to the head”

President Barack Obama told reporters Friday that he won’t negotiate with Republicans to end the budget standoff “with a gun held to the head of the American people.” Read more: NBC News 

Bill de Blasio considering Bill Bratton for old job as police commissioner

Former Police Commissioner Bill Bratton could be back at 1 Police Plaza if Bill de Blasio is elected mayor. Read more: New York Daily News

Bloomberg defends DC police, and remembers Democratic shutdowns

Mayor Michael Bloomberg this morning defended the police officers involved in yesterday’s shooting at the Capitol, saying they faced the same kind of instant judgments as officers in New York City. Read more: Capital New York 

New York state credit card surcharge law blocked

A federal judge has ruled that a New York State law that bans merchants from imposing surcharges on customers who pay by credit card is unconstitutional. Read more: AP

De Blasio has 50 percent lead over Lhota in new poll


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File photos

A new poll is predicting a landslide victory for Democrat Bill de Blasio in next month’s mayoral election.

De Blasio leads his GOP opponent Joe Lhota 71 to 21 percent among likely voters, according to the results of a Quinnipiac University poll released Thursday. Independence Party candidate Adolfo Carrion Jr. received two percent.

Those numbers are up from a September 19 Quinnipiac poll where de Blasio led Lhota 66 to 25 percent.

“The flurry of negative headlines about name changes, the Sandanista visit, the Cuban honeymoon don’t seem to have any effect,” said Maurice Carroll, director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute.

Lhota, who received the endorsements of the Statewide Association of Minority Businesses and the Latinos Unidos de Flushing today, downplayed the importance of the poll numbers in a statement through his campaign spokesperson Thursday.

“Polls go up and polls go down. While Mr. de Blasio spends his time in hiding, ducking tough questions about his ill-conceived proposals, we will continue talking about Joe’s plans to create jobs, improve our schools and keep us safe. We are on TV with our first ad of the general election and we remain confident that once New Yorkers learn more, they will choose Joe Lhota, a proven leader with a real plan to move New York forward.”

The poll, conducted from September 25 to October 1, surveyed 1,198 likely voters and had a margin of error of plus and minus 2.8 percentage points.

 

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Erick Salgado to continue mayoral campaign in general election


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

File photo

Erick Salgado may have suffered a big loss in the primary, but he is not ready to give up his mayoral hopes. The former Democratic candidate announced on Monday he is running in the general election on the School Choice Party Line.

“My running for mayor was never about politics. I entered the race because I believed strongly in a set of principles, included among them is a parent or guardian’s right to choose the best school for their child,” Salgado said in a statement.

The pastor and businessman said the School Choice Party places a high priority on “providing parents and guardians with viable public/private/charter school options for their children.”

One suggestion he has is to give tax credits to parents who enroll their children in private school as a way to offset some of the cost.

“Bankruptcy should not be a requirement of parents providing their children a sound education consistent with their religious or philosophical beliefs,” he said.

Salgado also explained that he is running as a third party candidate out of concern that the Democratic and Republican candidates are not addressing the needs of the city’s diverse communities.

“New York City has evolved away from being a melting pot. It is now a mosaic of many communities, each with its own customs, personalities and issues,” Salgado said. “The next mayor will have to understand this and be able to address these differences from day one in office.”

Salgado, who received 2.4 percent of the vote in the primary, will face an uphill battle in the November 5 election.

A Quinnipiac University poll released on Thursday, September 19 showed Democratic candidate Bill de Blasio with a 66 to 25 percent lead over Republican Joe Lhota. Independence line candidate former Bronx Borough President Adolfo Carrión Jr., had two percent.

 

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Lhota continues to blast de Blasio on past Sandinista support


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

File photo

As Bill de Blasio received an additional endorsement for mayor Tuesday, he faced more criticism about his past support of Nicaragua’s ruling Sandinista party, detailed in a recent New York Times article.

The piece, published online Sunday, examined de Blasio’s time in Nicaragua helping to distribute food and medicine in the late 1980s and how he “grew to be an admirer of the Sandinista party.” It also looked at how his time as a young activist has shaped him today.

The Sandinistas ruled Nicaragua from 1979 to 1990, and, according to the Times, were denounced by the Reagan administration as “tyrannical and communist,” though liberal supporters said they were “building a free society with broad access to education, land and health care.”

The article prompted two of de Blasio’s opponents in the race, Republican candidate Joe Lhota and Independence party candidate Adolfo Carrión Jr. to attack him for his past support of the Sandinista party.

“Mr. de Blasio’s involvement with the Sandinistas didn’t happen in 1917; it happened 70 years later when the cruelty and intrinsic failure of communism had become crystal clear to anyone with a modicum of reason. Mr. de Blasio’s class warfare strategy in New York City is directly out of the Marxist playbook. Now we know why,” said Lhota in a statement released Tuesday.

Carrión, calling him a “radical without a clue,” spoke of another fact mentioned in the Times article, de Blasio’s honeymoon in Cuba, which violated the U.S. travel ban.

“It’s no wonder de Blasio, the political operative and union organizer, whose world view is rooted in the Castro/Guevara philosophy that fueled the Sandinista dictatorship, is surrendering his policy agenda to collective bargaining organizations, he said in a statement.  “That’s why, whether it’s Stop, Question & Frisk, education policy, or business regulation and taxation, this election matters because it can erode the progress we’ve made as a city.”

In response to earlier comments from his rivals, de Blasio said on Monday “I’m not surprised that my opponents will throw labels and call names. That’s a Republican tactic. That’s a right-wing tactic,” according to published reports.

De Blasio also received criticism Tuesday for his choice of debate locations.

He announced today he would participate in three debates over the next six weeks, all in Manhattan.

Lhota, who recently called for weekly debates hosted in each of the city’s five boroughs, said it was “incredibly disappointing that Mr. de Blasio does not appreciate the need to hold debates outside Manhattan when New Yorkers in all five boroughs deserve the chance to learn more about the next mayor.”

On Tuesday, de Blasio found support from former Democratic primary opponent City Comptroller John Liu, who officially endorsed him for mayor.

“Now more than ever, we need a mayor who will stand up for working and middle class families and Bill is that leader. He understands this city is strongest when every New Yorker – no matter where they live or where they come from, who they love or what they look like – has a fair shot, said Liu. “It is time Democrats unite behind Bill de Blasio and work together to ensure a progressive fighter wins in November.

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Tuesday: Clear in the morning, then partly cloudy. High of 72. Winds from the NW at 5 to 15 mph. Tuesday night: Partly cloudy in the evening, then clear. Low of 48. Winds from the NNW at 5 to 10 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: We Are What We Are

Actor Bill Sage and director Jim Mickle will participate in a discussion and preview screening of We Are What We Are, a reimagining of a Mexican movie about a reclusive family that practices violent, secret rituals. Museum of the Moving Image at 7 p.m. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Woodhaven-Richmond Hill Volunteer Ambulance Corps could be calling 911

A South Queens volunteer ambulance corps has lost its main source of income and could be calling 911 if the owner of a collapsed neighboring building doesn’t fix the dangerous eyesore. Read more: New York Daily News

Lhota blasts de Blasio’s ‘unfortunate’ early socialist activism

Mayoral front-runner Bill de Blasio found himself on the defensive Monday, after his Republican rival Joe Lhota attacked him for supporting Nicaragua’s former Sandinista government and honeymooning in Cuba. Read more: CBS New York

Report: 2 LIRR employees plead guilty to fraud scheme

Two more Long Island Rail Road retirees pleaded guilty to charges of disability fraud just as before their trial was set to begin, according to a published report.Read more: CBS New York/AP

NY wants to crack down on fake online reviews

A perfect hotel? An amazing restaurant? Teeth whitener that leads to romance? Read more: NBC New York

Obama to address Iran, Syria in UN speech

President Barack Obama on Tuesday is expected to signal his willingness to engage with the new Iranian government if Tehran makes nuclear concessions long sought by the U.S. and Western allies. Read more: AP

President Obama endorses Bill de Blasio


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photos via Twitter/@deBlasioNYC

Updated, Monday, September 23, 2:46 p.m.

Bill de Blasio has received the presidential seal of approval.

President Barack Obama announced Monday he is officially endorsing de Blasio for mayor.

“Progressive change is the centerpiece of Bill de Blasio’s vision for New York City, and it’s why he will be a great mayor of America’s largest city. Whether it’s ensuring pre-kindergarten is available for every four-year old, expanding after-school programs for every middle school student who wants and needs them, making affordable housing available for more New York families and preserving community hospitals, Bill’s agenda for New York is marked by bold, courageous ideas that address the great challenges of our time,” Obama said in a statement.

De Blasio said he was “deeply honored” by the president’s support.

“I will work every day to advance our shared value of making sure everyone has a fair shot. On health care, tax fairness or the economy, the President is no stranger to addressing big problems with big ideas and big solutions. I will emulate the example he has set, and if elected I stand eager to work with him on an urban agenda that grows prosperity for all.”

The president joins a growing list of national and state Democratic leaders who have backed de Balsio for mayor, including former President Bill Clinton and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, U.S Senator Charles Schumer and Governor Andrew Cuomo.

Today, de Balsio also received the endorsement of the Queens County Democratic Party, which had backed City Council Speaker Christine Quinn in the mayoral primary.

“New York City needs a leader who has a progressive vision for the future and only Bill de Blasio has the record and experience to deliver on it,” said Congressmember Joe Crowley, chair of the Queens County Democrats. “Bill is someone who will fight tirelessly for all New Yorkers, not just some. He understands the many challenges our diverse communities face and will bridge the inequalities in our city while strengthening the middle class.”

De Blasio said he was “honored to receive the endorsement of the Queens County Democrats, a group of city leaders that has consistently represented and upheld the rights of working and middle-class families across the borough.”

 

 

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