Tag Archives: nyc elections 2013

2013 general election guide


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

File photo

As the clock ticks closer to the general election on Tuesday, November 5, The Courier, in our continuing election coverage, brings you our voters’ guide.

Polls are open from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. Be sure to cast your ballot for mayor, public advocate, city comptroller, borough president, city council and even judges.

According to the Board of Elections, you can find your poll site location online at http://nyc.pollsitelocator.com or by calling the voter Phone Bank at 1-866-VOTE-NYC.

 *Incumbent

 

MAYOR

Bill de Blasio
Democratic, Working Families

Joe Lhota
Republican, Conservative, Taxes 2 High, Students First

Adolfo Carrion Jr.
Independence

Anthony Gronowicz
Green

Jack Hidary
Jobs & Education, Common Sense

Michael Sanchez
Libertarian

Daniel B. Fein
Socialist Worker

Joseph Melaragno
Affordable Tmrw

Carl E. Person
Reform

Jimmy McMillan
Rent Is 2 Damn High

Randy Credico
Tax Wall Street

Erick Salgado
School Choice

Sam Sloan
War Veterans

Michael K. Greys
Freedom

Michael J. Dilger
Flourish

 

PUBLIC ADVOCATE

Letitia James
Democratic, Working Families

Robert Maresca
Conservative

James Lane
Green

Alex Merced
Libertarian

Deborah O. Liatos
Socialist Worker

Mollena G. Fabricant
Students First

Irene Estrada
War Veterans

Michael K. Lloyd
Freedom

 

BOROUGH PRESIDENT 

Melinda Katz
Democrat, Working Families

Aurelio “Tony” Arcabascio
Republican

Everly Brown
Jobs & Education

 

DISTRICT 19
College Point, Auburndale-Flushing, Bayside, Whitestone, Bay Terrace, Douglaston and Little Neck

Paul Vallone
Democratic, Independence

Dennis Saffran
Party: Republican, Conservative, Reform

 

DISTRICT 20
Flushing, Queensboro Hill, Mitchell Gardens, Kissena Park, Harding Heights, Auburndale and part of Whitestone

Peter Koo*
Democratic, Conservative

Evergreen Chou
Green

Martha Flores-Vazquez
Jobs & Education

Sunny Hahn
Reform

 

DISTRICT 22
Astoria, Long Island City, parts of Jackson Heights 

Costa Constantinides
Democratic, Working Families

Daniel Peterson
Republican

Lynne Serpe
Green

Danielle De Stefano
Independence, Conservative

Gerald Kann
Populist

 

DISTRICT 23
Hollis Hills, Queens Village, Little Neck, Douglaston, Bayside, Bellerose, Floral Park, Glen Oaks, New Hyde Park, Hollis, Hollis Park Gardens, Holliswood, Fresh Meadows and Oakland Gardens

Mark Weprin*
Democratic

Joseph Concannon
Reform

 

DISTRICT 24
Briarwood, Fresh Meadows, Hillcrest, Hillcrest Estates, Jamaica Estates, Jamaica Hills, Kew Gardens Hills, Utopia Estates, and parts of Forest Hills, Flushing, Jamaica and Rego Park

Rory Lancman*
Democratic, Working Families

Alexander Blishteyn
Republican, Conservative

Mujib Rahman
Faith and Values

 

DISTRICT 27
St. Albans, Hollis, Cambria Heights, Jamaica, Baisley Park, Addisleigh Park, parts of Queens Village, Rosedale and Springfield Gardens

Daneek Miller
Democratic

Sondra Peeden
Independence

 

DISTRICT 28
Parts of Richmond Hill, South Ozone Park, Rochdale and Jamaica

Ruben Wills*
Democratic

Mireille Leroy
Unity

 

DISTRICT 29
Forest Hills, Rego Park, Kew Gardens, parts of Maspeth, Richmond Hill and Elmhurst

Karen Koslowitz*
Democratic, Working Families

Jon Torodash
Civic Virtue

 

DISTRICT 30
Glendale, Middle Village, Ridgewood, Maspeth, Richmond Hill, Woodside, Woodhaven

Elizabeth Crowley* 
Democratic, Working Families

Craig Caruana
Republican, Conservative

 

DISTRICT 31
Rosedale, Laurelton, Springfield Gardens and the Rockaways

Donovan Richards*
Democratic

Scherie Murray
Republican

Ricardo Brown
Jobs & Education

 

DISTRICT 32
Belle Harbor, Breezy Point, Broad Channel, Hamilton Beach, Howard Beach, Lindenwood, Neponsit, Ozone Park, Rockaway Beach, Rockaway Park, South Ozone Park, South Richmond Hill and Woodhaven

Eric Ulrich*
Republican, Conservative, Independence

Lew Simon
Democrat

 

JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT – 11TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT, VOTE FOR 3

Jeremy S. Weinstein
Democratic, Republican

John F. Casey
Conservative

Robert J. McDonald
Democratic, Republican, Conservative

Barry A. Schwartz
Democratic

Kerry John Katsorhis
Republican, Conservative

 

UNOPPOSED CANDIDATES

Councilmembers Julissa Ferreras, Daniel Dromm and Jimmy Van Bramer are running unopposed during the General Election on Tuesday, November 5.

Councilmember Julissa Ferreras, who was elected to represent District 21 in 2009, currently serves Elmhurst, East Elmhurst, Corona and Jackson Heights.

Councilmember Daniel Dromm, who was elected to represent District 25 in 2010, currently serves Jackson Heights, Elmhurst, East Elmhurst, LeFrak City, Corona, Rego Park and Woodside.

Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer, who was elected to represent District 26 in 2009, currently serves Woodside, Sunnyside, Long Island City, Astoria and Maspeth.

 

CASINO GAMING, OTHER AMENDMENTS ON BALLOT

A controversial casino gambling referendum and five other proposed changes to the state Constitution will be up for vote November 5 on the general election ballot. Read more

Costa Constantinides eyeing Vallone’s seat in 22nd Council District


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

File photo

After winning the Democratic primary last month, Costa Constantinides is ready to head into the General Election to fill departing Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr.’s seat in the 22nd Council District.

“I think Astoria has always been a great place to live, I had a wonderful childhood growing up here,” he said. “It’s a wonderful place and I just want to help continue to foster that same atmosphere.”

In 2009, Constantinides was elected to serve as the Democratic District Leader for the 36th Assembly District, Part A. He served as Legislative Director and Deputy Chief of Staff to Councilmember James F. Gennaro.

In September, Constantinides took the win against attorney John Ciafone and longtime Community Board 1 member Constantinos “Gus” Prentzas in the Democratic primary.

Some of the main areas Constantinides hopes to address if elected are better environmental protection, including reducing traffic congestion, expanding open space and investing in clean energy. He also hopes to improve schools for the children in his district, with introducing better technology and dealing with overcrowding.

Constantinides also plans to clean up the streets by prioritizing garbage pickups, funding a street sweeping program like the Doe Fund, and making sure there are enough enforcement agents to make sure the community stays clean.

“All these things are sort of interconnected with one another and I think when we deal with each individual problem we’re going to help our community move itself forward,” said Constantinides.

Constantinides will run against Republican Daniel Peterson, Green Party candidate Lynne Serpe, Independent Danielle De Stefano and Populist Party candidate Gerald Kann in the general election on November 5.

“This is a real opportunity to vote for the mayor. It’s going to decide our city government,” he said. “It’s important to make sure your voice is heard. So I really encourage every constituent to come out and be part of the process, whether they’re voting for me or not.”

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Paul Vallone wins District 19 primary in final vote count, Shafran concedes


| mchan@queenscourier.com

File photos

Paul Vallone can pop the champagne bottle — again.

Final vote counts officially sealed the win for the Flushing attorney in a hard-fought and close Democratic primary race for City Council.

“I couldn’t be any more excited,” said Vallone, 46. “It was a delayed week, but it was very exciting.”

Vallone declared his victory on primary night last Tuesday, September 10, in a contentious race to replace scandal-scarred Councilmember Dan Halloran in the 19th District.

But the announcement was seemingly premature, as runner-up candidate Austin Shafran trailed by 144 votes and refused to concede.

With nearly 99 percent of precincts reporting, Vallone was leading his four opponents by about 31 percent of the vote, according to unofficial results. He had 2,723 votes to Shafran’s 2,579.

Vallone was declared the champion again after voting machines were checked and paper ballots were counted, a process that began late last week, his campaign said. He won by nearly 200 votes, according to preliminary results.

“You had to be strong all the way through,” Vallone said. “I kind of always hoped the paper ballots would reflect what the primary night results did. It ended up even giving us a little boost.”

His campaign manager, Austin Finan, said the gap between the two candidates narrowed to 134 votes last Friday after machines were recanvassed.

Vallone then gained 59 more votes to secure his victory on September 16, when affidavits, absentee and emergency paper ballots were tallied, Finan said.

While a spokesperson for the Board of Elections said the results could not yet be confirmed, Shafran said he would not contest them.

“We gave it a try. We went up against the Vallone name, which is pretty big,” he said. “I’ve had better days, but you come to grips with it a little bit every day.”

“At the end of the day, it’s under 200 votes total between the margin of victory. That’s like two votes per election district,” Shafran continued. “But whether you lost by one or 1,000, it doesn’t really matter in the long run.”

The race also included third place finisher Paul Graziano with 1,539 votes, John Duane with 1,005 votes and Chrissy Voskerichian with 900 votes, according to unofficial results.

Vallone — the son of former Council Speaker Peter Vallone Sr. and brother to Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr. — will face off with Republican Dennis Saffran in the November general election.

Primary Day voters’ guide


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

ELECTION-473x405

Mark your calendars: Tuesday, September 10 is Primary Day.

Voting is our American right, and we strongly urge everyone to make his or her way to the polls. There is no excuse.

On Election Day, polling places are open from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.

According to the Board of Elections, you can find your poll site location online at http://nyc.pollsitelocator.com or by calling the voter Phone Bank at 1-866-VOTE-NYC.

This year we will be casting our Primary ballots for mayor, public advocate, city comptroller, borough president, city council and even state committee members.

If needed, a runoff is scheduled for October 1 when no candidates in a citywide primary election receive at least 40 percent of the vote.

In case you missed the primary guides we’ve been posting on our website, here are the links:

Read them, learn about the candidates and make an informed decision.

It is up to us to elect those men and women who will lead our city and our borough most effectively.

Let your voice be heard. Every vote counts.