Tag Archives: North Shore LIJ

Rockaway residents fear losing community’s last hospital


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Assemblymember Phillip Goldfeder.

The Peninsula’s lone hospital is in critical condition.

Rockaway residents fear financial problems at St. John’s Episcopal Hospital will close the last safety net hospital in their community.

“Queens is a healthy borough, but we can’t continue to grow if we continue to lose hospitals,” said Peter Vallone, Jr., city councilmember and borough president candidate.

If St. John’s Episcopal were to close its doors, the nearest hospital, Jamaica Hospital, is more than a 20-minute drive away.

Changes, however, have already been made at St. John’s, which declined to disclose its financial situation to The Courier.

The detox unit has closed and several clinics and nursing homes are being outsourced, according to hospital officials.

Richard Brown, the hospital’s Interim Chief Operating Officer, said the unit’s closure will allow space for “much-needed” medical and surgical beds in the 257-bed building.

Additionally, St. John’s Family Practice, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics clinics have begun collaborative initiatives with the Joseph P. Addabbo Family Health Centers.

However, St. John’s is “considering all necessary action, including possible layoffs” to maintain the hospital’s stability.

“We cannot let community healthcare disappear from the Rockaways,” said Bill de Blasio, public advocate, mayoral candidate and a staunch supporter of outer borough hospitals. “We have to stop these free-fall closures that hollow out neighborhood healthcare.”

The hospital board is also exploring merger options with other health systems. The community hopes for a merger with major hospital chain North Shore LIJ, but Brown said no overtures between the two have been made.

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

TODAY’S FORECAST

Tuesday: Overcast with rain showers. Fog early. High of 54. Winds from the South at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 100% with rainfall amounts near 0.7 in. possible. Tuesday night: Partly cloudy with rain showers. Low of 41. Winds from the NW at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 60%.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Whine & Cheese Comedy Show

Every Tuesday, at 9 p.m., at Rèst-âü-Ránt in Long Island City, check out the Whine & Cheese Comedy Show featuring comics from NBC’s Last Comic Standing and Comedy Central. Free. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Panel votes to phase out two Queens schools, may still truncate third

A panel voted early Tuesday morning to close two New York City public schools and phase out 22 more, including two Queens high schools, according to reports. Read more: The Queens Courier

Video released of suspect wanted for groping girl at Woodside station

Police have released the video of a suspect wanted in connection with forcibly touching a 12-year-old girl on Friday, March 8. Read more: The Queens Courier

Flushing Commons construction to start this fall 

Construction on the much-anticipated $850 million Flushing Commons project will start in the fall, the Daily News has learned. Read more: New York Daily News

Ed Koch’s will leaves bulk of estate to sister

Ed Koch, the former mayor of New York who died last month at age 88, left the majority of his estate to his sister. Read more: Fox New York/AP

Queens gets upgraded medical facility for 9/11 responders

Money from the long-stalled Zadroga Bill has trickled down to Queens. North Shore-LIJ officials unveiled a new treatment center in Rego Park on Monday that will cater specifically to those who volunteered or worked at Ground Zero following 9/11. Read more: New York Daily News 

Cardinals celebrate Mass before entering conclave

Cardinals heard a final appeal for unity Tuesday before sequestering themselves in the Sistine Chapel for the conclave to elect the next pope, as they celebrated Mass amid divisions and uncertainty over who will lead the 1.2 billion-strong Catholic Church and tend to its many problems. Read more: AP

$120M psychiatric pavilion set to open in Glen Oaks


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

A multimillion dollar psychiatric pavilion in Glen Oaks is slated to open its doors to inpatients next month.

Zucker Hillside Hospital officials celebrated the $120 million project on December 7. The 130,000-square-foot facility, which has 115 beds, also includes a center for dementia patients and a new electroconvulsive therapy unit.

“The mental health system in this country is broken and deteriorated. Our pledge is, not [broken] in this hospital, not in our health system, not in our communities,” said Joseph Schulman, executive director of Zucker Hillside.

The two-story pavilion, located at 75-59 263rd Street, will treat patients suffering with depression, mood and affective disorders, substance abuse and dementia when it opens on January 8, officials said.

“Psychiatric illness and addiction cause heartache and alter lives. Their devastating impact scars families for generations,” said Dr. John Kane, vice president of the Behavioral Health Services for North Shore-LIJ. “This new pavilion will help us treat these disorders to change that, healing families and returning people to society’s mainstream.”

According to Kane, behavioral health disorders affect nearly half the population during the course of a lifetime and account for more disability and missed days of work than any other illness.

Queens Hospital Center cut the ribbon on an 8,500-square-foot expanded psychiatric program last week, but Kane said the recent sprouting of facilities does not mean there is an increase in a total number of beds in the community.

The needs of many mentally ill individuals are still not met, he said, and the emergence of local centers may only indicate a rebuilding of state-of-the-art facilities.

“In the last 10 years, the health system has made a tremendous investment in both inpatient and outpatient care, and that’s what we need,” Kane said.

Cathie Lemaire, of Huntington, said she has been hospitalized five times for severe depression and said the illness sidetracked her life for many years until Zucker Hillside suggested she try electroconvulsive therapy.

“I had great careers in sales, in electronics. I was selling to military and commercial contractors, but I would have repeated depressive episodes,” she said. “[Zucker Hillside] has allowed me to get back to my life, to my old self, to living. It’s priceless.”

People Making a Buzz


| tcimino@queenscourier.com

Lancman-with-QCC-students-at-Kupferberg-Center1

CHRONICLING THE HOLOCAUST

 

Assemblymember Rory Lancman presented awards to students who have documented the stories of local Holocaust survivors, keeping their stories alive for future generations. The ceremony was held at the Kupferberg Holocaust Center at Queensborough Community College, where the students presented their work.

Each student participating in the Holocaust awareness program conducted an in-depth interview of a specific survivor. The work of documenting survivors’ stories becomes more important every year as the community of Holocaust survivors continues to shrink.

“One of the most important things we can do to prevent another Holocaust is to make sure the stories of those who have survived are not forgotten,” Lancman said.

According to its mission, the project goes beyond just preserving the stories of the Holocaust. It also provides students with lessons in dealing with hate crimes and civic responsibility.

“These students have done tremendous and important work,” Lancman said. “We have to ensure that first-hand accounts of the horrors of the Holocaust are documented today so they cannot be forgotten or contradicted in the future.”

Dr. Arthur Flug, who has led the project for the past seven years at the Kupferberg Center, said that the work done by the students would become part of their generation’s commitment to social justice.

The following students received awards at the event:

Richard Flores

Jasmine Fludd

Akeem Dixon

Katherine Avalos

Danielle Del Priore

Sylvia Uzcha

Mauricio Moreno

David Coba

Joshua Oladiti

Yi Qiang Wang

Antoinette Malcolmn

 

SCHOLARSHIP

 Four teens from New York are among 12 legally blind, college-bound high school seniors to receive scholarships from The Jewish Guild for the Blind (The Guild). Among them are Daniel James Solomon of Belle Harbor, a student at Stuyvesant High School who has been awarded a scholarship of $10,000. The GuildScholar Program scholarships are awarded prior to the academic year that begins September 2012. The recipients are currently enrolled in high schools in the states of Florida, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Virginia. The GuildScholar Program was created, in part, through a generous grant from the Jeannette A. Klarenmeyer Trust.

A teacher of one of the winners is also being acknowledged for his role in encouraging and bringing out the best in his student. Each applicant was asked to write an essay about a teacher whose encouragement made a great difference in their lives. The teacher chosen from among the applicants’ essays will receive a prize of $5,000.

“We’re mindful of the often unexpectedly large sums of money needed to accomplish a successful transition from high school to a college or university, and we think that this scholarship money can be put to excellent use during this phase,” said Alan R. Morse, JD, PhD, President and CEO of The Guild. “At The Guild, we are committed to working toward a more inclusive society. The GuildScholar program will help assure that more blind students are able to enroll in colleges or universities that might otherwise be beyond their reach financially,” Dr. Morse continued. “We’re not concerned with their fields of study, but we are eager to help in the education of this country’s next generation of leaders, a group that must include persons with vision impairment,” he concluded.

The 12 winners were chosen after a rigorous application process that included criteria such as academic excellence, community involvement, legal blindness, financial need and U.S. citizenship.

For information on the GuildScholar Program’s scholarships for the 2013 academic year, contact Gordon Rovins at 212-769-7801 or e-mail guildscholar@jgb.org.

 

LOTTO WINNERS

The New York Lottery has announced the names of area Lottery players who claimed a winning ticket from one of the Lottery’s live drawings between December 25 and December 31, 2011. The following winners each received a cash prize valued at $10,000 or more.

*Jefferson Paulino of Bayside who won $29,206 on the Take Five drawing of December 24.

*Tarun Chillara of Floral Park who won $22,816 on the Take Five drawing of November 28.

*Concepcion Padilla of Jamaica who won $10,000 on the Win 4 drawing of December 21.

*Andrzej Wlodarski of Ridgewood who won $10,000 on the Mega Millions drawing of December 23.

*Ileana Sanchez of Ozone Park who won $40,000 on the Mega Millions drawing of December 23.

*Peter Chiu of Elmhurst who won $10,003 on the Mega Millions drawing of December 13.

*Stanley Kwiatkowski of Rockaway Point who won $250,150 on the Mega Millions drawing of December 23.

Alexander Akujuo of Rosedale who won $12,567 on the Take Five drawing of December 20.

 

APPOINTMENTS

 

The North Shore-LIJ Health System has announced the appointment of Kevin M. McGeachy, FACHE, as executive director at the Steven and Alexandra Cohen Children’s Medical Center (CCMC) of New York. He succeeds Arthur Klein, MD, who continues as the health system’s senior vice president of children’s services, but is also now serving as North Shore-LIJ’s western regional executive director, a position in which he has oversight of all health system facilities in western Queens, Manhattan and Staten Island.

For the past two years, McGeachy has served as CCMC’s deputy executive director. Before joining CCMC, he was associate executive director at three different North Shore-LIJ hospitals: at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset from 2005 to 2009, LIJ Medical Center from 2004 to 2005, and Forest Hills Hospital from 2001 to 2004. He began his career at the North Shore-LIJ Health System in 1998 as part of an internal consulting group charged with examining integration opportunities among the various entities of the health system.

Before joining the health system, McGeachy served as the director of health policy for the Nassau-Suffolk Hospital Council, an advocacy group representing hospitals on Long Island. He began his career at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Manhattan in a variety of positions within the Division of Ambulatory Care. He holds an MBA from Baruch College/Mount Sinai School of Medicine and received his bachelor’s degree from the Medical College of Virginia/Virginia Commonwealth University program in health administration. He is also a fellow in the American College of Healthcare Executives.

Dr. Klein joined North Shore-LIJ and CCMC in March 2009. In his new role as regional executive director, he will have administrative oversight of Lenox Hill Hospital, the Manhattan Eye Ear and Throat Institute, Staten Island University Hospital’s North and South Sites and the proposed Center for Comprehensive Care in Lower Manhattan. He will also focus on building physician partnerships and looking for new opportunities for growth and investment.

Before joining North Shore-LIJ, Klein was senior vice president and chief physician officer at Lifespan Corporation in Providence, RI, where he was also the associate dean for strategy and special projects at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. He served previously as executive vice president and chief operating officer at the New York Presbyterian Healthcare System, and as executive vice chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, where he completed his residency and fellowship in pediatric cardiology. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Cardiology and has written and presented extensively on pediatric cardiology. He received his medical degree from the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center and a bachelor’s degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA.

 

Kevin M. McGeachy (left), FACHE, has been appointed executive director at the Steven and Alexandra Cohen Children’s Medical Center. He succeeds Arthur Klein, MD, (right) who continues as senior vice president of children’s services.

New Year, new babies in Queens


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

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A second after the clock struck midnight, Nicolette Hunt came into the world. Officials at North Shore LIJ Hospital said the seven-pound baby was the first born on their campus in the New Year, as well as one of the city’s first newborns.

Eleni and James Hunt, of Little Neck, welcomed their New Year’s Day delivery, along with big sister, two-year-old Victoria. Hospital spokesperson Kristen Longo said the Hunts were aware of their daughter’s extraordinary timing as hospital staff closely monitored the clock during the delivery.

New York Hospital Queens also welcomed its first baby of 2012 — a 7-pound, 10-ounce little girl named Nina Love McConnell-Honore — born to parents Rose Honore and Duane McConnell of St. Albans.

“I feel great,” said mom Rose Honore. “I feel special and so does [the baby] — she is sweet, quiet and lovely. That’s why her middle name is Love.”
The family received a $1,000 savings bond and a congratulatory bouquet from the hospital.

Dr. Andrew Rubin, spokesperson for both Jamaica and Flushing Hospitals, claimed each facility welcomed a baby boy just after the New Year. Angeury Vargas was born at 1:39 a.m., weighing 7-pounds, 12-ounces at Jamaica Hospital and “Baby Boy” Carchi made his big entrance at 7:52 a.m., weighing 7-pounds, 8-ounces.