Tag Archives: noise

Noise tops complaints at Community Board 10


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

Noise complaints and concerns over spraying for the West Nile virus were some of the issues brought up at this month’s Community Board 10 meeting on Thursday, September 6.

From April to August of this year, there were 1,274 residential noise complaints phoned into 3-1-1, data shows, while 136 commercial noise complaints were made. Additionally, two calls were placed for houses of worship; 33 for parks; 86 for street and sidewalk noise; and 91 for vehicles.

Although residents may tire of making the calls for consistent noise makers, board chair Elizabeth Braton said continuing to call 3-1-1 helps track what types of noise complaints there are, and how consistent.

Several board members were also concerned that the Department of Environmental Protection was not properly notifying residents about spraying for West Nile virus. Members were concerned about people with sensitivities to pesticides, and toys left outside by children.

The board also approved an expansion to a medical office that would allow a nuclear stress test machine to be installed and make patient care easier. The structure is owned by Dr. Joseph Musso, a cardiologist who was represented at the meeting by land use lawyer Eric Polatnik.

The building, located at 94-07 156th Street, was zoned for an additional floor in the front of the building, but could not expand to two stories in the back. This can be changed, however, if the structure meets five criteria for an exemption, Polatnik said.

Because the front portion of the building was built on a wood frame, further foundation would be needed in order to prevent the building from shaking — and causing damage to the machine. This would not have to be done if expansion was done to the back building, which had a metal frame, Polatnik said.

Board members were concerned that once this expansion was done, there would be a desire for further expansion to the building. Polatnik assured the board that in order to expand, the owner needed the approval from the Community Board and expansion was at its members’ discretion.

Airplane noise torments northeast Queens residents


| mchan@queenscourier.com

File photo

A nonstop rush of aircraft flights and a barrage of low flying planes have residents in northeast Queens alarmed at the deafening “war zone” they say their neighborhoods have become in the last two months.

“The sound — it’s like you’re living in an airport,” said Angela Polito of Bayside. “It’s nonstop, every 20 seconds, one after another. It’s been terrible.”

Residents from Bayside and downtown Flushing say they have been tormented since mid-June by the ear-splitting roar of airplanes they say soar past their homes by the minute each day from 6 a.m. to noon and then again from 6 p.m. to midnight.

Oiman Chan of Flushing, who suffers from anxiety, said the constant blaring booms that rattle the windows of his Franklin Avenue co-op have become “numbing.”

“It sounds like you’re under a war zone,” said the 63-year-old retired Department of Education employee. “I am suffering from panic attacks already and this is killing me.”

Eddy Liu, 68, who lives in the same Flushing co-op, said the nonstop noise distresses thousands of shareholders, including masses of elderly people.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) did not comment before press time. But in a June 22 letter sent to State Senator Tony Avella, the agency said they were conducting a six-month trial to test a procedure at LaGuardia Airport, in which departing traffic turns left to the north off Runway 13.

Amy Yeung of Flushing said flight routes used to run north over College Point Boulevard, only shifting downtown during the annual U.S. Open tournaments. But recent lavish neighborhood developments like the Sky View Center mall, Sky View Parc luxury condos and upcoming future plans for Willets Point, she said, could be the motive behind the rerouting.

“That’s my wild guess,” said Yeung, 45. “[But] you can’t make one group of people happy and disturb the others, if that’s the case. Everybody has to go to work and everybody has to have quality of sleep.”

The FAA said it would take in public comment before making the new route permanent.

“The agency does not have the authority to prohibit aircraft from flying over a particular geographic area unless the operation is unsafe or the aircraft is operated in a manner inconsistent with federal aviation regulations,” the FAA said in the letter.

Meanwhile, Polito said the frequent flights over Bayside are almost as unnerving as how low the planes are flying.

“We can practically wave to the people in the planes,” she said.

Queens residents in Woodside and Briarwood have also said they’ve been living in turbulence from thundering aircraft.

Deafening Noise After Incident At Queens Plant


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Graphic by Jay Lane

Two women shot in Astoria

Cops are on the hunt for a man who allegedly shot his wife and daughter inside of a home in Astoria on Monday morning.  According to reports, the two women were shot in the head and were taken to Elmhurst Hospital and are now listed in stable condition. Read More: Queens Courier

Teenage boy fatally shot by bus madman Damel Burton was a protector of neighborhood kids 

The mother of the teenage boy killed by her ex-con boyfriend minutes before he shot up a Queens bus said Saturday there had been no signs of trouble.  She fought back tears speaking of the bright future she had seen for her slain son, a senior at Queens Transition Center. Read More: Daily News

Deafening Noise After Incident At Queens Plant

A steam release at a power plant in Queens was causing a deafening noise on Monday morning.  The steam was released to reduce steam pressure at the TransCanada owned Ravenswood Generating Station at Vernon Boulevard in Long Island City. Read More: MyFoxNY

Queens family of seven evicted in dispute with landlord over ‘dozens’ of violations 

A Queens family of seven is scrambling to find a place to live after their landlord served them with an eviction notice the day before Thanksgiving. Laura and Thomas Cavanagh said began withholding rent on the Broad Channel home after their landlord refused to fix dozens of problems — ranging from black mold under the sink to a rodent infestation in the attic.  Read More: Daily News

Postal Service Cuts To Lengthen Delivery Time

As financial problems continue to mount, the U.S. Postal Service is set to announce a series of unprecedented cuts today.  The estimated $3 billion in reductions will affect first class mail and likely eliminate the possibility of next day delivery for the first time in 40 years. Read More: NY1

St. John’s Visits The Motor City To Take On Titans, Honor Vitale

Head coach Steve Lavin’s new-look St. John’s basketball team (4-4) stays on the road in its final contest before breaking for 11 days for exams, taking on the Detroit Titans (3-6, 0-2 Horizon League) on Monday at 7 p.m. The second-ever matchup between the Red Storm and University of Detroit will air live nationally on ESPN2. Read More: Red Storm Sports

Queens’ Morning Roundup – 11/11/2011: Jury Acquits Assemblyman of Conspiring to Take Bribes


| jlane@queenscourier.com

Graphic by Jay Lane

Jury Acquits Assemblyman of Conspiring to Take Bribes

William F. Boyland Jr., a Democratic assemblyman from one of Brooklyn’s most prominent political families, was acquitted on Thursday of conspiring to take $175,000 in bribes in return for using his influence on behalf of a health care organization that runs hospitals in Queens and Brooklyn. Read More: Wall Street Journal

 

Barbara Sheehan sentenced to five years in prison

After dodging a murder conviction for the death of her husband, Barbara Sheehan has been reportedly sentenced to five years behind bars on a second degree weapons charge related to the case. Sheehan, who faced up to 15 years in prison prior to her sentencing, was acquitted of murder after a jury determined she acted in self-defense when she shot her husband, Raymond, a retired NYPD sergeant, 11 times on the morning of February 18, 2008. Read More: Queens Courier

 

Queens Councilman Pleads Guilty To Charges Stemming From 1996 Larceny Case

Just two days after winning re-election, a City Councilman pleaded guilty Thursday to charges stemming from a 15-year-old larceny case. Queens Councilman Ruben Wills admitted to stealing items and damaging a Manhattan office building in 1996. The case will be closed without jail time or probation if he does three days of community service and pays $2,500 in restitution. Wills said the incident arose from a business dispute. An outstanding warrant was issued for his arrest after he missed court dates. Read More: NY1

 

10th Anniversary Memorial Ceremony for American Airlines Flight 587 on Saturday

Saturday, November 12 American Airlines Flight 587 10th anniversary memorial ceremony

Beach 116th Street, Belle Harbor – 9 a.m.

There will be a moment of silence at 9:16 a.m. at the time of the crash, followed by a reading of the victims’ names. The ceremony will be held at the memorial site, which was unveiled for the fifth anniversary. More Event Details: Queens Courier

 

Stalled Road Construction Keeps Forest Hills Residents From Getting Sleep

Forest Hills residents are complaining they cannot get any sleep because of the noise stemming from cars driving over a work site on 71st Avenue. Read More: NY1

 

City surrenders in long battle to turn historic St. Saviour’s site into Maspeth park

The city has given up its long fight to acquire the land where a historic Maspeth church once stood and turn it into park space. But the city and now looking into purchasing a City Councilwoman Elizabeth Crowley (D-Middle Village) are smaller parcel of land from the nearby Martin Luther School as an alternative to the St. Saviour’s site. Read More: Daily News

 

Woodside monument honoring World War I heroes gets face-lift for Veterans Day

The majestic statue that stands at the foot of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway in Woodside was created to honor local soldiers who paid the ultimate price in World War I. The female figure, sword in one hand and shield in the other, stands sentry over the tiny plaza in the neighborhood formerly known as Winfield. Read More: Daily News

Deal to halt train noise, pollution in Middle Village


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Local leaders and politicians have moved a noisy and odorous train hookup further from Middle Village houses, though community concerns remain.

Senator Joe Addabbo, Assemblymembers Andrew Hevesi and Mike Miller and Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley were able to successfully negotiate terms with CSX Freight and NY & Atlantic Railroad to move the trains further from residential areas, a plan that has now been implemented.

The trains were previously left idling while their brakes were pressurized at the intersection of 69th Place and Juniper Boulevard South directly behind a residential area, causing considerable noise pollution as well as emitting fumes from garbage on board.

Though local officials hailed this first step as a move in the right direction, discussions with the train company are not over.

“I appreciate that CSX and NY & Atlantic are addressing the quality of life concerns of the people who live near the railroad,” said Crowley. “It is important to know that this is just a first step and that we have many more expectations for the Railroad companies to meet.”

Officials are still exploring further ways to remedy the quality of life issues that residents may still face — including more noise and odor.

“There’s been an improvement,” said Bob Holden, president of the Juniper Park Civic Association, since the train hookup has been moved. “There’s still a problem with trains switching and idling for long periods of time. They only moved it 400 feet, so it’s still affecting people, though it’s a little better now.”

The primary hookup is now located several hundred feet southwest of 69th Street near All Faiths Cemetery – moving the noise and fumes further from the residential community.

A secondary hookup, utilized only when the trains are operated when trains are operating at maximum capacity, is located 450 feet back from the current site.

“It’s a great first step in a long process. This move should help address some of the quality of life concerns faced by those living in the surrounding community,” said Miller.