Tag Archives: New York Hospital Queens

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

EVENT of the DAY: Summerstage WR/Felix Hernandez’s Rhythm Revue 

With over forty years in the music industry, their music and history transcends generations of pop culture and has a universal appeal to parents, grandparents, and children across the world. Also featuring DJ Felix Hernandez mixing in soul, Motown, funk, salsa and disco dance classics.

[Click here for more info or submit your events]

New $500,000 New York Hospital Queens Center for  Wound Healing at Silvercrest opens in Briarwood  

New York Hospital Queens and Silvercrest Center For Nursing and Rehabilitation celebrated the opening of the NYHQ Center for Wound Healing at Silvercrest with a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Tuesday, July 10. The new $500,000 center, at 144-45 87th Ave., in Briarwood, addresses the increasing need for more aggressive wound treatment for people with hard-to-treat chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers, diabetic ulcers and radionecrosis, officials said. Read more: [New York Daily News] 

Queens high school principal Caril Hudson Jr. arrested for possession of methamphetamine 

A Queens high school principal was nabbed just a block away from his school when cops found a baggie of methamphetamine in his car during a traffic stop, police said. Carl Hudson Jr., 33, was around the corner from Flushing High School on Northern Blvd. about 8:35 p.m on Tuesday when police discovered the meth in the bag in the car’s center console, police said. Read more: [New York Daily News] 

Far Rockaway man pleads guilty to JFK luggage thefts 

A Queens man is facing three to six years in prison after pleading guilty to a series of thefts from passengers in the terminals at John F. Kennedy International Airport. Queens District Attorney Richard Brown said Wednesday that 46-year-old Frederick McDonald of Far Rockaway, N.Y., had pleaded guilty to grand larceny in connection to six thefts. Read more: [1010wins] 

Bicyclist killed in hit-&-run 

A cyclist was fatally struck in Queens last night by a speeding car whose driver fled the scene, cops and witnesses said. The victim, who was carrying a bouquet of flowers, was struck at around 10:50 p.m. at Greenpoint Avenue and 39th Place in Sunnyside. Read more: [New York Post] 

 

NYHQ wound center helps patients heal


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

CFWH Ribbon Cutting

BY LORRI BROWNSTONE

Clarence McKay loves planting tomatoes, beets and carrots, doing yard work and other odd jobs around his home.

Unfortunately, a diabetic ulcer on his left foot means the 75-year-old retired hospital worker is unable to do the things he loves.

But that could change.

McKay has a better chance than ever at recovery thanks to New York Hospital Queens Center for Wound Healing at Silvercrest in Briarwood, which opened on June 26.

The facility features two hyperbaric oxygen therapy chambers, the second facility in Queens to offer this type of therapy.

The project, located at Silvercrest Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation, costs about $500,000, and helps patients with chronic wounds achieve high healing rates in shorter times. It is open to everyone in the community.

There are about 5 million people in the U.S. suffering from chronic wounds, and the number is rising, officials said.

“People are living longer and unfortunately there is a higher rate of diabetes and obese people in the country. I’m hearing about the cancer rate increasing and with that comes an increase in radiation injuries,” said Cari Dabak, the center’s program director.

Dr. Victor Chen, a specialist in wound care at the center, believes there is a current trend to open more wound care centers.

“Wound centers have a lot to offer,” Chen said. “Many will be at risk for amputation. And centers can offer an advanced level of care.”

While the facility treats all types of wounds, only 11 percent of patients qualify for hyperbaric oxygen therapy treatment.

Examples of patients who benefit from the chamber therapy include those with diabetic wounds, and those suffering from soft tissue damage due to radiation treatment.

McKay is one of those patients.

During treatment, McKay lies down in the transparent bed-like chamber for about two hours a day, Monday through Friday. His treatment will last up to six weeks. In the chamber, patients breathing in 100 percent oxygen under pressure, about two times the regular atmospheric pressure.

Humans normally breathe air consisting of 21 percent oxygen and 79 percent nitrogen.

“When patents come out (of the chamber), they say the feel ‘okay,’ ” Dabak said. “We check their sugar, lungs, blood pressure. . . and there can be some ear pain when you come right out. It’s like getting off of a plane.”

McKay doesn’t mind.

“I get to watch T.V. and they say I sometimes doze off,” he said.

After one week of outpatient treatment, McKay said he’s already noticing a difference. His pain has lessened and he sees more circulation in his foot.

“If I could get back to gardening and doing things around the house, well, I’d be jumping up and down,” he said.

The center is part of the New York-Presbyterian Healthcare System. Silvercrest Center is a 320-bed skilled nursing facility at 144-45 87th Avenue, Briarwood.

For more information about the center, call 855-480-HEAL.

 

NYHQ celebrates ER expansion


| sarahyu@queenscourier.com

DSCN0034w

New York Hospital Queens (NYHQ) just keeps growing.

On Monday, June 25, hospital administrators and elected officials such as Senator Toby Stavisky, Borough President Helen Marshall and Councilmember Peter Koo proudly cut the ribbon to celebrate the completion of the latest expansion of the emergency room.

Earlier this year, NYHQ celebrated the opening of its Urgent Care Center, which allowed the emergency department to expand community access to health care by making more beds available.

HEAL-NY (Health Care Efficiency and Affordability Law for New Yorkers), a state grant-funding program that supports the restructuring of New York’s health care system, funded the expansion of the emergency room and the completion of the Urgent Care Center for the hospital.

“We’re very fortunate to be able to open this emergency component and we were very fortunate to receive HEAL-NY money for this,” said NYHQ president and Chief Executive Officer Stephen S. Mills. “We try to take advantage of opportunities to provide more access for the population that needs it.”

To go along with the additional space, Marshall is giving NYHQ $300,000 from her capital budget toward the purchase of essential patient care equipment.

“We have increased the number of inpatient beds, have expanded community access to ambulatory care and opened a new urgent care center and today we cut the ribbon,” Marshall said. “I’m thankful to have this medical institution in the borough of Queens and I’ve continued to show my support and appreciation by awarding funding through my capital budget.”

 

NYHQ celebrates life


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

NYHQ 02w

Curtis Sliwa, radio personality and founder of the Guardian Angels, recalled being shot four times in 1992, then he told of his more recent struggle — prostate cancer.

Sliwa was the keynote speaker at the New York Hospital Queens (NYHQ) Celebration of Life, which sought to bring together cancer survivors who were once patients of the hospital and are either in, or on their way to being in, remission.

The event featured cancer information talks from some of the hospital’s doctors on how far treatment has come, along with tales from survivors.

AN emotional Helena Falletta, who only three weeks ago had surgery for stage-4 lung cancer, told the auditorium of fellow survivors about her several bouts with different cancers and how the staff at NYHQ had been there every step of the way.

“Since 2010, I have been fighting every day of my life,” she said.

Janice Zaballero, who survived her bought with breast cancer about 15 years ago and now works to help those who cannot afford screening or treatment, also spoke about the strength every one of the survivors had in making it through treatment.

“And I say to all of you, we are amazing,” Zaballero said to a roar of applause.

Sliwa, who was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2010, said the disease was something men shy away from discussing. He encouraged all men age 40 and up to get PSA testing and be more open to discussing the disease.

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Rangel, Long, Meng, Jeffries, Velazquez Declared Winners In Primaries 

According to AP numbers as of 12:30 a.m., Meng had 51 percent of the vote with 89 percent of precincts reporting. Assemblyman Rory Lancman had 28 percent, Councilwoman Elizabeth Crowley had 16 percent and Dr. Robert Mittman had 5 percent. Read more: [NY1] 

Rapper 50 Cent Involved in LIE Crash 

Rapper 50 Cent is out of the hospital after an accident with a tractor trailer. The accident happened just before midnight Tuesday on the Long Island Expressway. A spokesperson for the rapper, also known as Curtis Jackson, said he was treated for minor back and neck injuries at New York Hospital Queens. Read more: [NY1] 

Congregation Ahavath Shalom Synagogue in Forest Hills loses relics in burglary 

Religious artifacts were swiped from a Queens synagogue sometime in the past week, and the thief is still on the lam, cops said. The four objects — including a silver pointer, Torah breast plate, silver-coated plate and a ritual wine cup — were discovered missing Monday from the Congregation Ahavath Shalom Synagogue on 113th St. in Forest Hills, according to officials. Read more: [New York Daily News] 

Students once again learn to cook with acclaimed chefs as web show ‘Culinary High TV’ debuts its third season

A Queens producer is in talks to turn a popular web series, that teaches at-risk teens how to cook in some of the city’s top restaurants, into a television show. The third season of “Culinary High TV” debuts Friday on the show’s website. Read more: [New York Daily News] 

 

Cancer center to become a reality at NYHQ


| sLieberman@queenscourier.com

New York Hospital Queens (NYHQ) has begun the five-year process that will culminate in the opening of a new cancer center.

The project was put into motion by a gala benefit on May 30 that raised $1 million towards the expansion of the center. The benefit honored Prabha and Kanak Golia who, in conjunction with Dr. George F. Heinrich, Chairman of the Board of Trustees, and his wife, Debra, spearheaded the movement.

“We would like a comprehensive center so that patients can have access to one location,” said Stephen S. Mills, president and CEO of the hospital.

The idea is to put the three modalities of cancer treatment (surgery, chemotherapy and radiation) under one roof so that patients will receive treatment in a more organized and expedient way.

In addition, the creation of the cancer center will bring new social workers and support structures for patients and their families. It will allow the hospital to generate clinical trials, fellowship programs and a major research program, as well as increase educational screenings for cancer prevention.

“We will have much more access to some of the latest and best drugs with the hospital system backing us,” said Dr. Barry Kaplan, NYHQ’s director of Medical Oncology.

Because of its location in the middle of Flushing, the hospital is faced with a unique variety of cancers needing to be treated. For example, it has created a center that is focused on the treatment of liver cancer, the most prevalent cancer among the Asian population.

“We want to give people the confidence that NYHQ is the place for them to get treatment,” said Golia.

 

Queens man hacks wife with meat cleaver


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

A Queens woman is fighting for her life after her husband apparently bludgeoned her with a meat cleaver. The 54-year-old wife fought with her spouse in their Flushing home on Parsons Boulevard, near Ash Avenue, before running out into the street at about 5:55 a.m., cops said. Kang Wang, 53, allegedly stabbed her repeatedly on the sidewalk, while her son tried to break up the fight, cops added. She was rushed to New York Hospital Queens in very critical condition.

Police arrested the husband at the scene. Wang has not been charged yet. Wang’s adult son used a 2×4 and chased the dad off his mother, police said. The woman suffered severe head wounds from the meat cleaver, which was recovered from the scene, police said.

 

Committed to excellence in health care


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

By Stephen S. Mills

President & Chief Executive Officer

New York Hospital Queens

 

New York Hospital Queens is strongly committed to providing our patients high quality medical care outcomes (results) and to constantly improving the hospital experience for patients and their families — right here in Queens.

Over the years, New York Hospital Queens has implemented performance programs that have resulted in many quality and safety improvements.

In 2011 alone, this hospital achieved results that include but are not limited to:

• Ranked in the top 10 percent by the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program for Orthopedic procedures (for low post-operative morbidity)

• Reduced re-admissions for pneumonia, congestive heart failure and myocardial infection by five percent; New York Hospital Queens reduced readmissions below the New York State average of 20.9 percent.

• Increased Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) ratings in each of 10 domains, including communication about medication and discharge instructions; HCAHPS is the patient satisfaction measurement survey for acute care hospitals and is run by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)

• Met or exceeded quality measures for end stage renal disease in our outpatient kidney dialysis center

• Improved nursing quality care outcomes, such as reduction in falls with injury and central line infections

• Achieved nationally recognized Excellence Awards for Maternity Care, and for Joint Replacement by HealthGrades

• Became one of the first hospitals in the N.Y.C. area to achieve a completely electronic health record throughout the Emergency Room and inpatient care units

• The adoption of an electronic health record system provides clinicians a longitudinal view — an easier chart view over the span of time— that can lead to improved patient outcomes—both in quality and safety—as well as a patient’s satisfaction with their care. Now, the hospital is in transition to an electronic health record system throughout multiple ambulatory care centers in the community as a way to improve continuity of patient care and provider communication.

In 2012, we can anticipate that there may be more quality reporting requirements by regulatory agencies and there is a constant need for staff education and training regarding patient safety.

Managing persistent issues such as infections – whether acquired in or out of the hospital – is extremely complex and requires constant vigilance and attention from both medical professionals and patients. An educated and aware patient and family are an important part of prevention and safety.

 

Queens hospitals failing on patient safety, according to report


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Queens hospitals are well below the national average in patient safety according to a recent Consumer Reports investigation.

The report from the consumer advocacy group rated New York City-area hospitals in four measures of patient safety and found only five — none in Queens — above the national average.

The highest rated hospital in the borough, New York Hospital Queens, came in 43 percent below the national average.

“New York Hospital Queens is strongly committed to providing our patients high quality medical care outcomes and to constantly improving the hospital experience for patients and their families,” said Stephen S. Mills, the hospital’s president, adding there is a constant need for staff education and training regarding patient safety.

The safety measures rated were hospital infections, readmissions, discharge instructions and medication instructions.

“New Yorkers often assume that they have access to some of the best health care in the world,” said John Santa, M.D., director of the Consumer Reports Health Ratings Center. “And in some ways they do, with many leading physicians and state-of-the-art facilities in the area. But our analysis suggests that, when it comes to patient safety, New Yorkers often receive sub-standard care.”

More than 1,000 hospitals were rated nationwide. Thirty hospitals in the New York City-area were in the bottom five percent, according to the survey.

The other Queens hospital measured were:

- St. John’s Episcopal Hospital-South Shore was 48 percent below the national average.

- Flushing Hospital Medical Center was 52 percent below the national average.

- Jamaica Hospital Medical Center was 57 percent below the national average.

- Forest Hills Hospital was 62 percent below the national average.

Forest Hills Hospital ranked third lowest in the greater New York area and all five Queens hospitals rated fell in the bottom third.

“Whenever information contained in the various ‘hospital report cards’ identifies a quality issue, we are already aware of it and working aggressively to resolve it,” Forest Hills Hospital said in a statement.

This is done routinely to provide the best patient experience possible, hospital officials said, adding it has experienced significant improvement in all quality metrics and they are confident this will be “reflected in the results of the next reporting period.”

Four borough hospitals — Elmhurst Hospital Center, Peninsula Hospital Center, Queens Hospital Center and the Mount Sinai Hospital of Queens — were not rated due to a lack of data.

 

Preventing Hospital Readmissions


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

By Stephen S. Mills

As you may have heard in the news, recently-enacted health care reform legislation will assess penalties starting in 2013 against hospitals with higher than average readmission rates for certain conditions, such as heart failure, heart attack and pneumonia. Reducing hospital readmission rates has emerged as a core strategy at both state and federal levels to reduce health care costs.

All hospitals need to work on reducing readmissions, because it is the right thing to do for patients. Most patients look forward to going home and staying there to recuperate. A readmission can have a negative impact on a patient’s health outcome, which affects the overall hospital experience.

New York Hospital Queens has been actively working to reduce preventable readmissions for several years. Over the past year, New York Hospital Queens has reduced readmissions below the New York State average of 20.9 percent.

Hospital Plan of Curbing Readmissions

To curb readmissions, New York Hospital Queens has a five-point plan developed by our medical team of nurses, doctors, case managers and community partners (such as the Visiting Nurse Service and local nursing homes).

• The medical team coordinates and prepares a patient’s discharge plan early during the patient’s stay and makes arrangements for after-hospital care.

• The medical team educates the patient and family by explaining medication information, such as which medications the patient will need, and the time to take the medication and the appropriate dosage.

• The hospital’s palliative care team counsels a patient and empowers them to communicate how they would like to handle future health care plans.

• New York Hospital Queens has a discharge phone call program that helps identify patients at risk for readmission. On those follow-up phone calls, nurses ask about patient symptoms. Nurses can identify patients who may think their symptoms are “abnormal” but in actuality, those symptoms can be expected, and vice versa.

• The hospital also identifies help the patient may need after discharge. Options may include going to a skilled nursing facility after discharge, getting in-home “visiting nurse” assistance, or, now, a new option, the “Transitional Care Unit” at New York Hospital Queens. The soon-to-open unit was developed for patients needing up to 20 days of post-acute care, which is run by a skilled nursing team from the Silvercrest Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation.

As illustrated, there are many ways for a hospital and a patient’s medical care team to reduce readmissions. However, this responsibility does not lie with the hospital and medical care team alone.

The patient, with the help of family, will need to closely heed discharge instructions, manage medicines correctly, abide by follow-up doctor visits and communicate concerns immediately back to the primary physician or hospital. Check if instructions given are complete and repeat-back those instructions to the hospital caregiver. Finally, ask, “Do I have this right?” and make sure the patient and family members know the danger signs to look for, so as to avoid an overreaction or underreaction.

New York Hospital Queens is strongly committed to providing our patients top quality outcomes and improving the patient and family experience—right here in Queens. By incorporating the hospital’s responsibilities along with patient/family responsibility in the after-hospital care of the patient, we hope to reduce the risk of readmission even further and make the patient’s health care experience more satisfying, with even better outcomes.

Stephen S. Mills is President &Chief Executive Officer of New York Hospital Queens

New Year, new babies in Queens


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

LIJw

A second after the clock struck midnight, Nicolette Hunt came into the world. Officials at North Shore LIJ Hospital said the seven-pound baby was the first born on their campus in the New Year, as well as one of the city’s first newborns.

Eleni and James Hunt, of Little Neck, welcomed their New Year’s Day delivery, along with big sister, two-year-old Victoria. Hospital spokesperson Kristen Longo said the Hunts were aware of their daughter’s extraordinary timing as hospital staff closely monitored the clock during the delivery.

New York Hospital Queens also welcomed its first baby of 2012 — a 7-pound, 10-ounce little girl named Nina Love McConnell-Honore — born to parents Rose Honore and Duane McConnell of St. Albans.

“I feel great,” said mom Rose Honore. “I feel special and so does [the baby] — she is sweet, quiet and lovely. That’s why her middle name is Love.”
The family received a $1,000 savings bond and a congratulatory bouquet from the hospital.

Dr. Andrew Rubin, spokesperson for both Jamaica and Flushing Hospitals, claimed each facility welcomed a baby boy just after the New Year. Angeury Vargas was born at 1:39 a.m., weighing 7-pounds, 12-ounces at Jamaica Hospital and “Baby Boy” Carchi made his big entrance at 7:52 a.m., weighing 7-pounds, 8-ounces.

New York Hospital Queens welcomes first baby of 2012


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy of NYHQ

Rose Honore and Duane McConnell celebrated the New Year with one of the first bundles of joy born in 2012.

Nina Love McConnell-Honore, the first baby born at New York Hospital Queens, and among the first in the city, was welcomed to the world 18 minutes into the New Year, weighing in at 7-pounds 10-ounces.

“I feel great. I feel special and so does she,” said mother, Rose Honore, about her and the baby. “She is sweet, quiet and lovely. That’s why her middle name is Love.”

Among the gifts bestowed on the proud family were a $1,000 savings bond and a congratulatory basket of flowers from the hospital.

New York Hospital Queens raises money to save lives


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Alexa Altman

In an attempt to assist the life-saving forces of New York Hospital Queens (NYHQ), The Women’s Auxiliary and the Community Advisory Council have developed the Save-A-Life Campaign, a fundraising initiative that raises money for cardiac equipment for the hospital’s ambulances.

Members from both organizations collected funds by selling raffle tickets for a 42 inch plasma-screen television and a Tiffany & Co. necklace.

“We are not asking for money for the hospital. We are asking for money for the community,” said Frank Macchio, president of the Community Advisory Council. “That’s why we are reaching out to the community — this technology can save your family and neighbors.”

The state-of-the-art cardiac machines monitor a patient’s vital signs, heart rhythms and core temperature while wirelessly transmitting the information back to the doctor at the hospital. Using hands-free leads, the machine can adjust a patient’s heart back to a normal rhythm.

Physicians can also direct paramedics at the scene while forming a plan of action for when the patient arrives at the hospital.

The raffle, along with a $10,000 donation from the Flushing Rotary, raised approximately $30,000, enough to purchase one cardiac machine. The drawing took place on Wednesday, November 23 at NYHQ in Flushing.

Vincent Gianelli and Cyrille Kousiaris won the television and the necklace, respectively.

Free lectures on breast health


| tcimino@queenscourier.com

In recognition of Breast Cancer Awareness month, New York Hospital Queens will be offering free lectures about breast health and cancer at The Bay Terrace shopping center in Bayside.

Upcoming speakers and dates will be:

*Tuesday, October 18 at 6 p.m.– Susan Lee, M.D. Acting Director, Breast Center, New York Hospital Queens, will present a lecture entitled “Breast Healthcare and Screening.” Lindsey Alico, genetic counselor, will present a lecture entitled “Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer and How You Can Determine Your Risk.” Jacqueline Xouris, director, Community Health Outreach, N.Y.S. Cancer Services Program of Eastern Queens will speak about the New York State Cancer Services Program. A breast cancer survivor will speak about her experiences.

*Monday, October 24 at 6 p.m. – Margaret Chen, MD, assistant director, Breast Center, New York Hospital Queens, will present a lecture entitled, “Breast Healthcare and Screening.” Jacqueline Xouris, director, Community Health Outreach, N.Y.S. Cancer Services Program of Eastern Queens, will speak about the New York State Cancer Services Program. A breast cancer survivor will speak about her experiences.

The presentations will be in the vacant corner store on the upper level, directly across from the Bayview Dry Cleaners and next to Villiagio Tanning Salon. Bay Terrace is located at 212-75/77 26th Avenue.

It is not necessary to RSVP. Refreshments will be served.

If you require any additional information, call Debra Pagano Cohen, director, Community and Government Affairs, at 718-670-1586.