Tag Archives: new year’s day

Parents welcome city’s first New Year’s baby at Elmhurst Hospital


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation

New York City‘s first New Year cry was heard through Elmhurst Hospital as Tenzin Choetso was welcomed into the world.

Tenzin was born to parents Metok Dolma and Choegyal Dorjee one second after midnight on Jan. 1 at Elmhurst Hospital Center. The couple, both from Tibet and now living in Woodside, reportedly also has another daughter.

The baby girl, weighing 6 pounds, 11 ounces, received a name given by the Dalai Lama, according to a hospital spokesperson. The parents put in a request to the Dalai Lama for the baby’s naming while Dolma was pregnant, and the Tibetan spiritual leader responded by giving the name Tenzin, meaning “to conquer the wisdom of Buddha,” the spokesperson said.

His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama was given the name Tenzin Gyatso.

“We are thrilled and excited that one of the first babies of 2014 was born at Elmhurst,” said Chris Constantino, Elmhurst Hospital Center’s executive director. “Our staff is overjoyed.”

Tenzin Choetso is not Elmhurst Hospital’s first “New Year’s baby.” In 2013, at exactly midnight, another baby was born at the hospital.

 

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| jlane@queenscourier.com

Graphic by Jay Lane

Queens man indicted for New Year’s Day fire-bomb spree

A Queens man has been indicted on state and federal charges for a fire-bombing spree that targeted an Islamic mosque, a Hindu temple, a convenience store and three homes over several hours on New Year’s Day, authorities announced today. Accused fire-bug, Ray Lazier Lengend, also known as Suraj Poonai, already was in jail after being arrested within days for all but one of those incidents, which spanned Queens and Long Island. Read More: New York Post

 

Federal Judges Approve State’s New Congressional Districts

A three-judge panel in Brooklyn federal court has approved a map for New York’s new congressional districts that was proposed by a federal magistrate earlier this month. Due to population changes around the country, New York is set to lose two members of Congress this year, going from 29 seats in the House of Representatives to 27. The map drawn by federal magistrate Roanne Mann keeps most of the current districts, but one change is a new Queens district that is almost 40 percent Asian-American. Read More: NY1

 

Peyton near deal with Broncos

Peyton Manning wants to play for the Denver Broncos in Act II of his outstanding career. A person briefed on negotiations said the NFL’s only four-time MVP called Tennessee Titans owner Bud Adams and told him that he had picked the Broncos. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak on the matter. Read More: New York Post

 

Shopping cart victim says she wishes boys who hurt her ‘well’

A Manhattan charity worker who was nearly killed by a shopping cart pushed over a garage railing by teenage punks in October spoke publicly for the first time today — expressing compassion for the pranksters who dropped the cart on her head. Marion Hedges, during a walk outside her Upper East Side apartment, said she hasn’t received an apology from the evil-doers. Read More: New York Post

 

12 injured in Brooklyn bus accident

Twelve people were injured in a bus accident in Brooklyn today, fire officials said. The collision occurred shortly after 10 a.m. after a car blew through a red light on Avenue J and rammed into a B11 bus, said MTA spokesman Kevin Ortiz. At least three of the dozen people injured were passengers on the bus, Ortiz said. The victims were taken to Lutheran Medical Center and Kings County Hospital. Read More: New York Post

 

‘Shakedown’ rabbi loses appeal

A Manhattan appeals court today upheld the conviction of a crooked Brooklyn rabbi for trying to shake down billionaire Steve Cohen’s hedge fund with phony allegations of inside trading. The U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously rejected Rabbi Milton Balkany’s claim that jurors should have been allowed to consider if he was entrapped, saying “Balkany failed to present any evidence that the government ‘induced’ him to commit the crimes charged.” Read More: New York Post

 

Tennessee woman gets no-jail deal after trying to check gun at 9/11 Memorial

A registered nurse and fourth-year med student got a no-jail, misdemeanor deal today for the Tennessee-registered gun she tried to check at the 9/11 Memorial in December. Manhattan prosecutors this morning dropped the felony gun possession charges Meredith Graves had originally been slammed with — charges carrying a mandatory minimum of 3 1/2 years prison. Read More: New York Post

No garbage/recycling collection on January 2


| brennison@queenscourier.com

In observance of New Year’s Day, garbage and recycling collection will be suspended on Monday, January 2.

Alternate side parking rules, street cleaning and mail delivery will also be suspended.

Residents who normally receive Monday garbage collection can place their trash out on Monday after 4 p.m. for pickup.  Those who receive Monday recycling collection will not have their recycling picked up until Tuesday, January 3.

For questions about Sanitation services and holiday schedules, contact 3-1-1 or visit the DSNY website at www.nyc.gov/sanitation.

Health Department Reminds New Yorkers to Stay Safe on New Year’s Eve


| tcimino@queenscourier.com

Emergency room visits for alcohol-related injuries, illness soar on New Year’s Day each year 

As New Year’s Eve celebrations in the City get underway, the Health Department reminds New Yorkers to stay safe and be aware of the potential health risks of excessive drinking. Alcohol-related emergency department visits more than double on New Year’s Day compared to what is typically observed, according to an analysis by the New York City Health Department. Peak hours of arrival at the emergency department for alcohol-related visits are between 1 a.m. and 4 a.m.  This pattern is consistent across several years of data.

“As New Yorkers head out this weekend for New Year’s Eve, remember that alcohol can impair your judgment and coordination and that excessive drinking is dangerous,” said New York City Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas Farley. “During the early hours of New Year’s Day, our hospitals see a great number of New Yorkers who suffer injuries or illnesses related to alcohol, more than any other day of the year. By taking some simple precautions like limiting your alcohol intake and planning a ride home, you can keep yourself and others safe.”

While alcohol-related emergency department visits peak in the early hours of New Year’s Day excessive drinking impacts New Yorkers year-round, particularly on weekends. Each year, alcohol kills an estimated 1,500 New Yorkers and in 2008 nearly half – 712 – of the deaths were due to alcohol-related injury or violence. Alcohol is associated with approximately 46% of homicides, 26% of deaths from accidents and poisoning, and 28% of motor vehicle-related deaths in New York City each year.

Excessive drinking is characterized by binge drinking – defined as five drinks for a man and four for a woman on one occasion – or heavy regular drinking. However, judgment, coordination, and reaction time are impaired with lower amounts of consumption. Limiting yourself to two alcoholic drinks on an occasion can greatly reduce the risk of injury or illness.

To further help keep you safe this New Year’s Eve, the Health Department and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism offer the following tips:

  • Have “drink spacers” – make every other drink a non-alcoholic one, such as water. Drink seltzer with lime or lemon or water with a splash of juice for color.
  • Don’t drink on an empty stomach. Having food in your stomach allows your system to absorb alcohol more slowly.
  • Stop drinking while you’re still thinking. Excessive drinking can put you or someone else at risk for injury or violence and the consequences can be fatal.

For information about unhealthy drinking or treatment for alcohol dependence, call 311 or 800-LifeNet (800-543-3638).

*NOTE Pertaining to Figure Above: The Health Department currently tallies emergency department visits from 49 NYC hospitals accounting for 95% of annual emergency department visits in NYC. Alcohol-related emergency department visits are defined as any visit with a mention of alcohol in the chief complaint. The data do not represent all alcohol-related visits to emergency departments in NYC as data from the other 5% of hospitals is not included and some visits may not be reported as alcohol-related.