Tag Archives: National Weather Service

NYC area prepares for major snow storm


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

File photo

For the first time this winter, the city is getting ready for a potentially powerful snow storm.

According to the National Weather Service (NWS), the flakes should start falling early Friday morning and the bad weather will continue through Saturday.

Earlier in the day, the NWS  issued a winter storm watch for all of New York City and other parts of the tri-state area, but by the afternoon had changed it to a blizzard warning with 10 to 14 inches of snow expected.

In addition to snow, the storm will bring powerful winds at 20 to 30 mph with gusts up to 45 mph, and a mixture of rain and sleet, particularly on Friday, making for slippery conditions and possible power outages.

There is also a coastal flooding watch for western Long Island Sound and the Twin Forks of Long Island, said the NWS.

At a briefing on the city’s storm preparations this morning Mayor Michael Bloomberg said that the forecasts may be exaggerating the amount of snow, but you never know.

Bracing for the worst case scenario, the city is ready with more than 250,000 tons of salt, 350 salt spreaders and plows for 1,800 sanitation trucks, said the mayor.

City residents can track the progress of the Department of Sanitation‘s clearing operations for their specific street online.

Con Ed also said it is preparing for the storm and any outages it may cause.

To report any outages and downed power lines, or to check service restoration status, customers can visit  www.coned.com/ReportOutage or call -800-75-CONED (1-800-752-6633).

 

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As chilly temps remain, snow heads towards NYC


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

File photo

New Yorkers once again woke up to freezing temperatures and blustery winds Thursday morning, but tomorrow they’ll need to deal with a new winter weather headache.

Snow is expected to hit the tri-state area Friday afternoon and evening, according to the National Weather Service. Accumulations, however, will only be around one to two inches.

After the snow stops, the chilly weather will continue into the weekend. Highs will slowly start to creep into the thirties beginning tomorrow, with lows in the twenties.  On Monday temperatures will finally return to normal January averages and above, with highs in the upper thirties Monday and mid-forties on Tuesday.

 

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Significant winter storm heading to Northeast


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Map courtesy of NWS

A storm system that already brought snow, tornadoes and other severe weather to the central and southern U.S. will hit the Northeast today and tomorrow, further disrupting holiday travel.

Though, according to the National Weather Service (NWS), the snow is expected in the upper Ohio Valley and the interior Northeast, locally it will mainly bring rainy and windy conditions.

In New York City, a wintry mix of rain, snow, and sleet will start this afternoon, but is expected to turn to just rain after about 4 p.m., and could be heavy at times.

The NWS has also issued a high wind warning for the area, from 4 p.m. today until 6 a.m. Thursday, with 25 to 40 mph winds with gusts up to 60 mph. There is also a coastal flood warning from 8 p.m. Wednesday until midnight

The storm’s timing could also impact holiday travelers throughout the U.S.

As of this morning, the storm has already caused the cancellation of over 325 flights around the U.S., reported CBS New York, but at least one airline, US Airways, is waiving cancelation fess for travelers that need to change their flights because of the weather.

Storm to hit Sandy-stricken Northeast


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

File photo

As the Northeast still recovers from Sandy, another storm is poised to strike the region.

The National Weather Service has issued a warning about a nor’easter, which is expected to impact the tri-state area Wednesday and Thursday.

Until early Thursday morning Queens is under a winter weather advisory, which may bring up to a few inches of snow, and a high wind warning with 25 to 35 mph winds and gusts up to 60 mph.

The storm could also cause coastal flooding and additional beach erosion along a coast that has already been ravaged by Sandy.

(Photo: NWS)

In anticipation of the nor’easter, Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced yesterday that all city parks, playground and beaches will be closed from noon Wednesday until noon Thursday because of approaching nor’easter.

“No general evacuations have been ordered, but if you experienced significant flooding during Hurricane Sandy, you should consider taking shelter with family and friends, who do not live in low-lying areas, or go to one of the City-run storm shelters. There are still thousands in the region that are without power and heat,” said a storm advisory posted on NYC.gov.

As of Wednesday afternoon, there were almost 12,800 customers with outages in Queens, more than any other borough, and the power might not be restored until this weekend.

On Monday, Harry J. Farrell, president of Local 1-2 of the Utility Workers Union of America, NY, warned “the public to brace for another round of outages,” adding that ”parts of the energy grid were damaged beyond repair and much of the power that has been restored is jerry-rigged.”

To prepare for the upcoming storm, the NYPD has the following tips:

  • We ask that you ensure loose items or debris around your home are secured, and any tree limbs that were affected by Sandy be removed or secured.
  • Stock up on essential food and water supplies if possible, and fuel your vehicles when you can (we know the lines are long!)
  • Make a plan – ensure family members know how to contact each other and where to meet should communication be difficult.
  • Check your flashlights and make sure they have a supply of batteries.
  • If you use candles, use them with care – keep them away from any flammable objects (curtains etc) and never use them unattended – particularly when sleeping.
  • Do not use your stove or oven to provide heat – Carbon Monoxide is deadly and open flames are even more dangerous.

 

Morning Roundup: Hurricane edition


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Google Maps

NYC HURRICANE FORECAST 

National Weather Service:

Hazardous Weather Outlook

High Wind Warning

Coastal Flood Warning

Flood Watch 

Monday: Rain. The rain could be heavy at times. High near 61. Very windy, with a northeast wind 36 to 45 mph, with gusts as high as 65 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New precipitation amounts between a half and three quarters of an inch possible. Monday night: rain. The rain could be heavy at times. Low around 54. Very windy, with a northeast wind 38 to 43 mph becoming southeast 32 to 37 mph after midnight. Winds could gust as high as 75 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New precipitation amounts between 1 and 2 inches possible.

Tuesday:  Showers likely. Cloudy, with a high near 61. Windy, with a south wind around 29 mph, with gusts as high as 48 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New precipitation amounts between a quarter and half of an inch possible. Tuesday night Showers likely. Cloudy, with a low around 49. South wind 15 to 18 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New precipitation amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch possible.

Hurricane Sandy updates

Check out the latest news on Hurricane Sandy. Read more: Queens Courier

Many Rockaway residents ignore evacuation, remain home

Despite calls from elected officials in the area, many Rockaway residents say they’re staying, and have hunkered down for the impacts of Hurricane Sandy. Read more: Queens Courier

Con Ed prepping for storm, potential power outages

The high winds and heavy rains expected with Hurricane Sandy may knock out power in areas of the city.  In preparation for the storm, Con Edison has thousands of employees working around the clock to respond to any problems with electric, gas, and steam systems. Read more: Queens Courier

Bracing for storm, U.S. stock markets to close

All United States stock and options markets will close on Monday as Hurricane Sandy approaches, as Wall Street braces for the storm to barrel through the heart of the country’s financial center. Read more: New York Times

Obama cancels Florida campaign trip, returns to DC

President Barack Obama is canceling a planned campaign appearance in Florida and returning to Washington to oversee the federal government’s response to the ever-threatening Hurricane Sandy. Read more: AP

Some see opportunity in storm, no transit

New Yorkers who rely on the subway to get around are out of luck today. Read more: Fox 5 New York

 

 

Above average snowfall to hit city this winter: report


| brennison@queenscourier.com

File photo

After a relatively snow-free winter last year, New Yorkers will need to get their shovels out of the shed and dig in this winter.

A report from accuweather.com said the Northeast will be hit with an above average amount of snowfall this year. Average snowfall in the city is 25 inches, meaning the city is forecasted for well above two feet of snow this year.

Last winter, residents had to deal with only five inches of powder, a far cry from the more than 50 that blanketed the city the year prior.

Despite the report, meteorologists from the National Weather Service (NWS) said it is still too early to predict this winter’s snowfall.

“At this time there is about an equal chance of average, above average or below average precipitation this winter,” David Stark, meteorologist from the NWS, said.

New York was in a La Nina winter last year, said Stark.  This year’s outlook is looking at a neutral or El Nino winter, which may have, as of now, an unknown effect on the season’s weather, he said.

Stark did add that one aspect of the city’s winter will be above average; the NWS’s Climate Prediction Center said New York has 30 percent chance of seeing above normal temperatures this winter.

Tornado touches down in Queens


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Breezy

More than a breeze spun through Breezy Point last weekend as a tornado touched down, disrupting the oceanside community.

Trees and roofs took the brunt of the damage during the twister that tore through Queens on Saturday, September 1. Several roofs were torn off at the Breezy Point Surf Club.

Nobody was hurt at the club, said General Manager Bob Ordan, and he expects cleanup to last a couple of more weeks.

“We’re lucky the storm hit this weekend and not last weekend,” Councilmember Eric Ulrich said, who surveyed the damage in the area shortly after the storm. “Because last weekend the Surf Club was filled with people.”

Saturday saw a lot of wind shear in the atmosphere, which is the turning of winds and a key ingredient in tornadoes, said National Weather Service (NWS) meteorologist Joey Picca. The moisture and storms in the area combined with the wind shear resulted in the tornado. Winds were estimated at 70 mph, placing it at the lower end of the Enhanced Fujita Scale, which measures the storms.

Joey Mure, 16, just got home from the gym when he saw the tornado across the water near Coney Island.

“I couldn’t believe it,” he said. “It was huge.”

The Breezy Point resident said he could hear a whistle from the storm, but that was soon overtaken by the sounds of sirens.

This is not the first time a tornado has touched down in Queens in recent years. The city has experienced an uptick in these cyclones, though Picca said it is too short of a period to say with certainty that a trend is developing. Between 1950 and 2010, the area was hit with 10 tornadoes.

“We’re much better at observing tornadoes now. So it’s certainly possible that long ago there were one or two that were missed,” he said.

Assemblymember Philip Goldfeder said in the future he hopes warning times for tornadoes can be increased.

“When people started to see [the tornado] was the first time we got the warning,” he said.

The NWS put out a tornado warning at 10:55 a.m., minutes before the wind tunnel landed in Queens.

Picca said weaker twisters are harder to detect ahead of time resulting in warning times of mere minutes.

Mure said he hopes there is not a need for a warning anytime soon.

“I hope I never see one again.”

 

Flash flood warning issued for Queens


| brennison@queenscourier.com


Heavy rains may cause flash floods throughout the borough.

The National Weather Service (NWS) has issued a flash flood warning for Queens lasting until 2 p.m.

More than an inch of rain has already fallen in parts of Queens and one to two more inches is possible.

Some flooding is already occurring and is imminent other places, the NWS said.

The southbound Van Wyck Expressway at exit 6, the eastbound Grand Central Parkway between the Long Island Expressway and Jewel Avenue and the eastbound Long Island Expressway at Francis Lewis Boulevard are closed.

Highways, underpasses and other low-lying spots are most vulnerable to flooding.

The NWS warned that just one foot of flood water is enough to sweep a vehicle off the road.

 

Severe thunderstorm watch issued in Queens


| brennison@queenscourier.com


Severe thunderstorms currently over New Jersey are expected to strike Queens in the late afternoon.

The National Weather Service (NWS) issued a severe thunderstorm watch for the area with damaging winds and hail possible.

The borough last week dealt with an intense storm that knocked out power to thousands of residents while knocking down branches throughout Queens.

Rain is forecasted to begin falling at about 3 p.m. The watch will remain in effect until 11 p.m.

 

Fourth heat wave bakes city


| brennison@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Terence M. Cullen

New Yorkers will have to deal with two more days of temperatures approaching 100 degrees before getting a break from the sweltering weather.

Stifling heat will blanket the area over the next two days as temperatures are expected to hover in the mid-90s today. High humidity will make the climate feel closer to 100 degrees.  Wednesday temperatures will near 100 with the heat index near 105.

Click here for a list of free pools in Queens

this is the fourth heat wave this season that has had 16 days of temperatures above 90 degrees this year.

The National Weather Service (NWS) has issued an excessive heat advisory for the potentially dangerous hot spell. The advisory will last through tomorrow night.

Heat is the number one weather-related killer in the United States, resulting in hundreds of fatalities each year, the NWS said.

Tips to keep your pets safe in the heat

Cooling centers will be open throughout the city tomorrow offering an escape from the sweltering heat. Click here to find the one nearest you. 

Cooling centers are air conditioned places, such as Department for the Aging senior centers, Salvation Army community centers, and public libraries that are open to the public during heat emergencies.

 

Record high temperatures expected in Queens


| brennison@queenscourier.com

File photo

Less than a month into summer, New York City is already in the midst of its third heat wave with triple digit temperatures still on the way.

Temperatures are expected to hit 100 tomorrow — which would match the record high — with the heat index closer to 110. Average temperatures for this time of year are in the mid 80s.

The last time LaGuardia Airport reached 100 degrees was July 22 of last year.

Click here for a list of free pools in Queens

Queens has already recorded more than 10 days with temperatures above 90 this year.

The National Weather Service (NWS) has issued an excessive heat watch for the potentially dangerous hot spell.

Heat is the number one weather-related killer in the United States, resulting in hundreds of fatalities each year, according to the NWS.

Tips to keep your pets safe in the heat

Cooling centers will be open throughout the city tomorrow offering an escape from the sweltering heat. Click here to find the one nearest you. 

Cooling centers are air conditioned places, such as Department for the Aging senior centers, Salvation Army community centers, and public libraries that are open to the public during heat emergencies.

The city’s Office of Emergency Management has offered some tips to staying cool:

New Yorkers should heed the following tips to stay cool during this week’s extreme heat:

• Use an air conditioner if you have one.

• If you do not have an air conditioner, go to a cooler place such as a store, mall, museum, movie theater, or friend/family member’s air-conditioned home, or visit a cooling center.

• Check on your at-risk family, friends and neighbors often and help them get to a cool place.

• Use a fan only when the air conditioner is on or the windows are open. Fans alone will not keep you cool when it is really hot outside. Fans work best at night to bring in cooler air from outside.

• Drink plenty of water or other fluids, even if you don’t feel thirsty. Avoid beverages containing alcohol, caffeine or high amounts of sugar.

• Never leave children, pets or those who require special care in a parked car.

• Avoid strenuous activity, or plan it for the coolest part of the day, usually in the morning between 4 AM and 7 AM or in the evening. If you exercise, drink two to four glasses of cool, nonalcoholic fluids each hour. A sports beverage can replace the salt and minerals you lose in sweat. If you are used to regular exercise, just keep in mind the symptoms of heat illness when exercising and stop or rest if any occur.

• Be careful if you take a cold shower to stay cool – sudden temperature changes can make you feel dizzy or sick.

 

Rain in forecast through Thursday; flood advisory issued


| brennison@queenscourier.com

rain

After a May with the most rain since 2004, more precipitation is forecasted for every day this week.

Approximately a quarter inch of rain is expected today, according to the National Weather Service (NWS), higher in areas that get hit with thunderstorms.

Due to the expected rains, the NWS has issued a coastal flood advisory for Queens for tonight into early tomorrow morning.

Low-lying areas along the shoreline should expect minor to moderate flooding.

New Yorkers have grown used to the rainy weather after more than 5.75 inches of rain fell in May, the second most rain in the month this millennium, and it isn’t likely to stop anytime soon. Three of the first four days of June have seen rainfall, and the forecast predicts a better than 30 percent chance of rain everyday through Thursday.

 

Thunderstorm watch issued for Queens; large hail, damaging winds possible


| brennison@queenscourier.com


A severe thunderstorm watch has been issued by the National Weather Service (NWS).

Queens has experienced high temperatures and humidity throughout the past few days. An approaching cold front will trigger the storms, the NWS said.

Residents should be aware if they will be outdoors tonight — heavy rains and lightning are expected. Damaging winds and large hail is also possible for the borough.

 

 

Flood advisory issued in Queens


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Rain

A flood advisory has been issued by the National Weather Service (NWS) as a result of the morning’s heavy rains.

Rain was falling at rates up to an inch per hour, flooding roadways, underpasses and low-lying areas.

A special weather statement was also issued by the agency due to the thunderstorms in the area.

The NWS reminded residents that if you can hear thunder you are close enough to be struck by lightning and should remain indoors if possible.

 

City to approach record high temperature today


| brennison@queenscourier.com

SOCRATES SCULPTURE PARK1

In a year that has already set a number of all-time high temperatures, the city is again bracing for record heat today, as temperatures will approach 90 degrees.

Today’s forecasted high of 88, is more than 25 degrees higher than the average high time of year; last year’s high temperature was 55.

The highest temperature of the year is also the highest resident have dealt with since August of last year.

The record high for this date was set ten years ago, when temperatures hit 92 on the thermometer.

Warm temperatures and sunny skies are sure to send many residents outside today, but with the high heat comes high pollen counts. Pollen.com has the pollen level at 11.8 out of a possible 12 today.

The National Weather Service (NWS) has also issued a warning for an increased risk of brush fires for the city due to the combination of dry conditions, heat and wind.

The temperature is forecasted to drop to 78 tomorrow, with highs later in the week more in line with seasonal temperatures.