Tag Archives: motorcycle

Two arrested after bikers, ATV riders drive recklessly on Van Wyck Expressway: cops


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

Police arrested a motorcyclist and an ATV rider on the Van Wyck Expressway near the Kew Gardens area on Saturday after a group of bikers were caught driving recklessly, cops said.

Omid Bedi, 30, and Equilla Ross, 39, were riding on the Van Wyck Expressway at about 5 p.m. when cops came to the roadway in response to several complaints about a large group of dirt bikes and ATV motorcycles, authorities said.

Police found the bikers on both sides of the expressway near Hillside Avenue, and observed one four-wheeled ATV driving the wrong way on the highway. They also saw some of the motorcyclists lift their bikes over the expressway median before fleeing and leaving behind two ATVs and a dirt bike. Bedi and Ross were apprehend at the scene.

Bedi, a Queens resident, who was riding a blue Yamaha ATV, has been charged with reckless endangerment, criminal nuisance, reckless driving, unregistered motorcycle and improper license violation. Ross, a resident of Mount Vernon, who was driving a red Honda motorcycle, has been charged with two counts of criminal nuisance.

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24-year-old motorcyclist dies in Belt Parkway crash


| editorial@queenscourier.com

POLICE TAPE

A Queens Village man was killed Wednesday in a motorcycle collision on the Belt Parkway, cops said.

Officers discovered 24-year-old Julian Smith lying on the ground in the center lane of the Belt Parkway near the Van Wyck Expressway at about 3:50 a.m., according to police.

He was found unconscious and unresponsive next to his bike, and was pronounced dead at the scene, officials said.

The investigation is still ongoing.

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20-year-old woman dies in Grand Central Parkway motorcycle crash


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Graphic image

Updated 1:07 p.m.

A motorcyclist was injured and his passenger was killed when he lost control of his bike on the Grand Central Parkway early Tuesday morning, cops said.

The crash happened while the motorcyclist was traveling westbound on the roadway at about 4:30 a.m. just before the 94th Street exit in East Elmhurst, according to police.

The bike’s operator, a 21-year-old man, was taken to Elmhurst Hospital in stable condition with injuries to his shoulder and legs.

His 20-year-old passenger, Giuseppina Lascalia of Astoria, was also taken to Elmhurst Hospital, where she was pronounced dead,  authorities said.

The investigation is ongoing.

 

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Woman killed in Queens Village motorcycle crash


| ctumola@queenscourier.com


A 31-year-old woman was killed Sunday night after she was struck by a car while riding her motorcycle in Queens Village, police said.

The victim, who has yet to be identified by police, was traveling eastbound on Jamaica Avenue around 10:20 p.m. when the accident occurred, according to officials.

A Nissan Maxima driving westbound on Jamaica Avenue struck the motorcyclist as the car was attempting to make a left onto Springfield Boulevard, cops said.

The motorcyclist was taken to Long Island Jewish Medical Center where she was pronounced dead.

The 22-year-old driver, who was not injured in the crash, remained on the scene of the accident and investigation is ongoing, police said.

 

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Flushing resident in near-fatal motorcycle accident, family raising $500K for medical fees


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of the Michaelides family


The family of a Flushing resident and St. John’s University alum who was in a near-fatal motorcycle accident on Father’s Day is in a desperate struggle to raise half a million dollars for medical fees.

Anthony Michaelides, 25, lost control of his bike on June 15 while trying to merge into a freeway in Los Angeles and hit the guardrail, propelling him over the barrier and more than 100 feet down into a ravine, family members said.

He suffered double lung collapse, bleeding from his brain, a ruptured spleen, a lacerated aorta, severe damage to his liver, fractured wrists and a broken left arm. Despite the injuries, paramedics found him alive and currently he is in stable condition at Los Angeles County General Hospital under heavy sedation. His family is hoping to raise money through upcoming events and crowdfunding site CrowdRise.

“He is one of the sweetest and most generous persons you could meet. Whenever you needed help he was always right there,” said Michaelides’ cousin, Krysta, who started the CrowdRise page. “This is such a tragedy, I couldn’t sit back and do nothing. I think about him every day. But doing this and collecting donations like this is gathering positive vibes. It’s keeping me busy and in my mind, keeping Anthony alive for me.”

The family has raised nearly $50,000 on CrowdRise already. Michaelides’ alma mater, Frank Sinatra School for the Arts High School, is organizing a show with proceeds to benefit him to be announced at a later date.

Family and friends will host fundraising events at Republic Bar in Astoria on Wednesday night, in Pita Pan restaurant on Saturday, and in Five Guys Burgers and Fries chains in The Bay Terrace shopping center on Friday and Saturday in the College Point location. Proceeds from sales during the day at the eateries will go toward Michaelides. There will also be #saveanthony shirts on sale for $15 during the events.

Michaelides graduated from St. John’s University with a degree in psychology, and then earned a master’s last year from New York University in education counseling. His goal was to be a guidance counselor at Frank Sinatra, but since there were no open opportunities he moved to Los Angeles late last year.

The school called Michaelides a few weeks before his accident to let him know there was a position opening, a sibling said, but now he won’t be able to take it.

“It’s just really bad luck. Everything that happened is bad luck,” said Michaelides’ sister, Connie. “It would mean a lot to the family if he did get his dream job, but our priority is for him to get better.”

 

To donate, please visit the CrowdRise page.

To learn more about Anthony Michaelides, please click here

Upcoming fundraising event times and locations:

Wednesday, June 25th
Republic Bar
3329 Astoria Blvd
Astoria, NY 11103

Saturday, June 28th
Pita Pan
37-15 30th Avenue
Astoria, NY 11103
11 am- 2 am 

Friday, June 27th
Five Guys Burgers and Fries in Bay Terrace Shopping Center
210-33 26th avenue
Bayside, NY 11360
4 pm – 9 pm

Saturday, June 28th
Five Guys Burgers and Fries in Northside Plaza/College Point
132-01 14th avenue
Queens, NY 11356
4 pm – 9 pm

 

 

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Off-duty NYPD cop killed in Jamaica motorcycle crash


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

File photo

An off-duty Queens NYPD officer was killed while riding his motorcycle in Jamaica Monday, police said.

The accident happened at about 5 p.m. on Linden Boulevard at 158th street.

The cop, identified as 28-year-old Curtis Johnson, was riding his Harley Davidson eastbound down Linden Boulevard when it collided with a Chrysler Concorde as it was trying to make a left turn off of 158th street from the westbound side of Linden Boulevard, officials said.

After crashing into the Chrysler, Johnson was thrown from his seat and the motorcycle struck a second vehicle, a Nissan Altima, which was traveling westbound on Linden Boulevard at 158th Street, cops said.

Johnson, who, according to published reports, worked in Jamaica’s 103rd Precinct, was taken to Jamaica Hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Police said there have been no arrests and the investigation is ongoing.

 

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Courier reporter gears up for Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photos and video by Cristabelle Tumola


When I told my parents I would be jumping on a motorcycle for the first time in my life, their faces went blank and they gave me the response I’ve heard so often since I asked them years ago for a skateboard: “You’re joking, right?”

Although I was raised among mostly boys and had numerous falls and tumbles, my parents always made sure I knew “extreme hobbies” would be out of the question because safety was their number one priority.

However, when I told them that this particular adventure would be to go over the safe ways to handle a motorcycle, they eased off and gave me their blessings.

With New York State having over 680,000 licensed motorcyclists in 2013, according to the DMV, and 5,153 Queens students coming out of New York’s Motorcycle Safety School, it is always important to be aware of the safety and responsibility that comes with owning a bike.

In honor of Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month I put on my leather jacket, strapped on boots and took part in a Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) Introductory Motorcycle Experience course offered by the Motorcycle Safety School just west of Lindenwood, Queens, over the Brooklyn line.

FOR MORE PHOTOS OF MY MOTORCYCLE ADVENTURE, CLICK HERE

Our instructor for the day was martial artist, professional film and TV stuntman and DMV-certified instructor Adam Wood, who said he knew riding a motorcycle was exactly what he wanted to do. Coming from Colorado, he said, he did not want to be at the mercy of New York City’s public transportation.

The session began with an introduction to the different types of motorcycles — cruisers, sport, dual-purpose and touring bikes. With all the choices, the goal is to sit on as many different bikes as possible, find out what you like, how good it looks and feels, and think about where you’ll be riding.

However, before going out and picking your favorite ride, pay attention.

State law requires motorcycle riders to wear two things before hitting the road: Department of Transportation (DOT) certified helmet and eyewear. How do you know your gear is DOT-certified? Just check the sticker.

According to MSF, proper gear also includes a long-sleeved shirt or jacket, full-fingered gloves, long pants and over-the-ankle boots (rubber soles, no laces). Wood also showed us motorcycle-specific over-pants with armor built into the shins, hip and knees.

A safety fashion tip — leather is the best material to look for in motorcycle clothing because, according to Wood, at 25 mph, leather lasts up to six seconds when making impact with the floor, while jeans only last 0.75 seconds.

The importance of gear is to allow the rider to have good communication with the motorcycle. Comfort, visibility and protection are the key things to remember when picking proper gear.

“You’re going to want to buy the gear that allows us to interact with our motorcycle the best,” Wood said. “You should do research to arm yourself with information so you don’t put yourself in bad situations.”

Following the classroom lesson of the day, it was time to take the session outside and add some “seat time” under our belts.

Before mounting any bike, remember these are very heavy pieces of machinery, ranging from 200 to 900 pounds. Once you release that kickstand, it’s only you and your strength stopping that bike from hitting the floor.

In addition to the handlebars, a motorcycle has five other primary controls. Three of those controls are hand-operated and mounted on the handlebar. There is the throttle, which allows you to rev up the engine, the front brake and the clutch lever.

While on our Suzuki bikes, we learned the clutch lever is what allows you to change gears. When you come to a stop and you don’t want the bike to shut off, you have to squeeze the clutch and then ease back out.

Using what Wood called the “Friction Zone,” you maintain a smooth ride with your bike and don’t stall or accelerate uncontrollably.

The remaining controls are foot-operated and control the rear brake and shifting of the gears. You don’t need much pressure to switch to different gears; a soft tap up switches from first gear to N and then up to 5.

Unlike in a car, there is no meter telling you what gear you are in, so in order to check if your bike is on first, you have to give the shift lever three taps down and if you stop feeling clicks, that means you are on the lowest gear.

Although I wasn’t able to fully ride the motorcycle, because I do not have a permit, I was able to get a taste of what it takes to control such a machine — gentle taps, concentration and having the proper gear and training.

After looking at photos and watching my videos, I think my parents are more relaxed with the idea of me getting on a Harley Davidson one of these days… Now wait until I get that tattoo.

For more information of the Motorcycle Safety School, visit www.ridemss.com. MSF offers motorcycle courses at Queensborough Community College and for more information or to find a course closest to you, visit www.msf-usa.org or www.nysmsp.org.

 

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One dead, one injured in motorcycle accident on Cross Island Parkway


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

One man is dead and another injured after a motorcycle accident on the Cross Island Parkway.

According to the NYPD, on Sunday at approximately 5:36 a.m. police responded to a 9-1-1 call of a motorcycle accident northbound on the Cross Island Parkway near the Whitestone Expressway. Police found David Wilson, 27, of South Richmond Hill with severe trauma through his body. Emergency medical services responded to the scene and pronounced Wilson dead on arrival.

Through investigation, police found Wilson had been driving a 2008 Suzuki motorcycle traveling north on the Cross Island Parkway when he lost control  of the bike and struck a barrier near the Whitestone Expressway. There was also a 27-year-old male passenger on the motorcycle who was taken to Queens General Hospital and is in stable condition with cuts around his body.

There were no other vehicles or people involved in the accident and the investigation is still ongoing, police said. 

 

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Family, friends remember Flushing 20-year-old killed in motorcycle crash


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Facebook

Hundreds gathered in spite of wind and rain to honor a 20-year-old Flushing man killed in a motorcycle crash last week.

“This was one of my best friends,” said Niaz Aziz. “He was like a brother to me.”

Kiyanoush Asif died June 12 when he crashed his 2005 Kawasaki motorcycle into an oncoming 2011 Honda Accord. The car was making a left turn at the intersection of Northern Boulevard and Murray Street, police said.

Asif accelerated and struck its rear passenger side door at around 5:30 p.m., cops said. He was pronounced dead at Flushing Hospital Medical Center. The other driver remained at the scene and no criminality is suspected, police said.

The death ­— caused by blunt trauma to the head, torso and extremities — was ruled an accident, according to the medical examiner’s office.

Nearly 200 friends remembered Asif at a June 13 vigil outside Francis Lewis High School, where he graduated in 2011.

Blustering winds and rain in 60 degree weather did not stop them from meeting that night to pay their respects.

“He was a really smart kid, loved by everybody,” said Danny Salik, 20. “He was always smiling, always happy. There was nothing bad about this guy.”

Asif was a rising junior studying biology at Hunter College. He had volunteered at Flushing Hospital, friends and family said, and was an Army Junior ROTC cadet at Francis Lewis. He also had a passion for rapping.

“He was not my grandchild. He was my heart,” said Asif’s grandmother, Talat Noori. “God gave us a rose, but he was just for us to have temporarily. We still say thank you for every second, every minute of it.”

Monika Friend said many former classmates came to share tales of her cousin, who kept his personal life private.

One told the family Asif had once spent three periods in high school consoling an upset stranger.

“We felt proud of him,” said Friend, 31. “That was our boy.”

Asif bought his motorcycle about two weeks ago, though his parents begged him not to, his family and friends said.

“He was strong and brave and humble,” said Aziz, 20. “He was one of the realest people I knew.”

Aziz, a close friend for more than 12 years, said he got a cryptic call from the hospital through Asif’s cell phone on the day of the crash.

“They said they couldn’t tell me what was wrong but needed me to go there,” he recalled. “They said he wasn’t feeling well.”

He soon found out the news through Asif’s family.

“I lost a part of me,” he said, adding that he returns to the site of the crash often.

“These are the hardest days of my life,” Aziz continued. “We’re still over here hurting. I can’t even think straight. I can’t believe it.”

 

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