Tag Archives: Long Island City

Big turnout at first Hunter’s Point South affordable housing forum


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYC EDC

Judging from the turnout of the first Hunter’s Point South affordable housing forum on Monday, apartments in the Long Island City waterfront properties are likely to be filled quickly.

More than 200 people packed the Sunnyside Community Services room on 39th Street, seeking information about apartments in the buildings, which will start accepting applications on Oct. 15 for 60 days, leading officials to close the doors because of a potential fire hazard — a good sign, they said.

Dozens of people, who formed a line outside the building, were turned away and told about upcoming affordable housing forums.

“This speaks to how many people want to live in this community, they want to stay in this community, but the affordable housing piece is really important to them,” Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer said. “This [project] is going to allow a lot of folks to stay in this community. I’m really happy with this turnout.”

The Forum

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

Of the more than 900 units that will be available in the first two buildings of the development — 32-story Hunter’s Point South Crossing and 37-story Hunter’s Point South Commons — 186 units, or about 20 percent, will be low-income housing, and 738 apartments will be moderate- and middle-income housing.

HUNTERS POINT INCOME SLIDE

Brand-new studio, one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments will be available for all of those income levels.

Low-income rental prices start from $494 for a studio and max out at $959 per month for a three-bedroom, while eligible incomes range from about $19,000 to approximately $49,000 annually.

Rents for middle- and moderate-income units range from $1,561 to $4,346 per month for household incomes of $55,200 to $224,020 annually.

HUNTERS POINT RENTS

Most apartments will be reserved for residents already in the neighborhood, city workers or people with disabilities.

The buildings will give 50 percent preference to applications living within Community Board 2, 7 percent preference to those with mobility or hearing disabilities or those who are visually impaired, and 5 percent for city employees.

 

Pets are allowed in the buildings. However, they are limited to 75 pounds each.

Potential residents should register with NYC Housing Connect as soon as possible to create an application profile and visit the Hunter’s Point South website for more information. Following the 60-day period during which residents can apply, a lottery of applications received through Housing Connect will be held and prospective residents will be notified in early 2015. The buildings expect to start placing residents next year.

Charts

The apartments feature views of the Manhattan skyline and various amenities, including a 24-hour attended lobby, on-site manager and staff, a party room, an outdoor terrace, a fitness center, a playroom, a bike room and an outdoor community garden. There will be 250 parking spaces on a first-come, first-served basis for an additional fee.

Two more affordable housing forums will be held on Oct. 1 at 7 p.m. at Big Six Towers, and Oct. 6 at 7 p.m. at Academy for Careers in Film & TV.

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Sweet time at the Flea


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

flea

Visitors at the LIC Flea & Food were in for a sweet time this past weekend.

The popular Long Island City market, located at the outdoor lot on the corner of Fifth Street and 46th Avenue, hosted a Sweets Festival highlighting vendors that hit every visitor’s sweet tooth.

During the festival, LIC Flea vendor Ice & Vice was awarded the judges’ pick, and vendor This Pie Is Nuts! was picked as the visitors’ favorite.

The LIC Flea Beer Garden, which is set up along the basin in the back of the market with views of the Manhattan skyline and outdoor seating, continues to offer beer selections from SingleCut Beersmiths, Queens Brewery, Finback Brewery and Rockaway Brewing Company.

In addition, visitors will now also be able to enjoy New York-made red and white wines, as well as mimosas made using lemonade from LIC Flea vendor Frittering Away.

LIC Flea & Food is open every Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and will run through the end of the year. The LIC Flea Beer Garden is open during the hours of operation of the flea market.

For more information visit www.licflea.com or www.facebook.com/licflea.

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LIC film series to combine curated films and free local beer


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

2C

A new film series is looking to bring the borough monthly fun evenings with curated classic films and free drinks.

The inaugural event for the series called Cinema Under the Influence will kick off on Oct. 11 with a showing of the films “Blue Velvet” and “Halloween” at the Chain Theatre located at 21-28 45th Rd. in Long Island City.

Cinema Under the Influence, which curators plan to continue monthly, will include a double feature with free beer provided by Queens Brewery. The idea came after such events were seen popping up around the city, yet none could be found in Queens, according to Jon Hogan, one of the curators.

“I’d like [people] to come realizing that programs like this can happen in Queens and Queens is fertile ground with something like this,” Hogan said.

Hogan and the other curators, Brian Essman, Benham Jones and Edwin Adrian Nieves, get together and pick films that “speak to each other,” whether they share same themes, focus or other qualities.

For the inaugural program, which begins at 7 p.m. with a reception, the curators picked “Blue Velvet” and “Halloween,” because both of the films show what is scary about the suburbs and are a good lead into the Halloween season, according to Hogan.

Image courtesy of Kate Melvin

Image courtesy of Kate Melvin

Cinema fans who come to the Oct. 11 event will also receive a program featuring essays comparing and investigating both films. The essays are written by Nieves, who writes a film blog called “A-BitterSweet-Life,” Dr. Kendall Phillips of Syracuse University, and others.

“We hope to continue doing this for the community because it seems like something that people have been wanting for a while,” Hogan said. “The seeds are there and we would like to pursue that.”

The screening of “Blue Velvet” will begin at 8 p.m. and will be followed by a half-hour intermission featuring a raffle with prizes donated from local businesses. The night will end with “Halloween.”

The details for the November event of Cinema Under the Influence will be announced on Oct. 11.

Tickets, which include three beers, are $15 and are available at the door the day of the event or online here.

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Doughnut Plant opening first LIC production facility and shop


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy Doughnut Plant

Manhattan-based Doughnut Plant, which has been gaining popularity throughout the city and in Japan with its new versions of the classic pastry, is coming to Long Island City.

The treat makers signed a 10-year lease for nearly 8,500 square feet on the concourse level of the five-story Falchi Building, which will expand production space for the doughnut makers as they celebrate their 20th year of business, according to a spokeswoman for Jamestown, which owns the building.

Newmark Grubb Knight Frank represented Doughnut Plant in the transaction, while Jamestown was represented by Cushman and Wakefield, Crain’s reported.

“Our goal with the Falchi Building was to create a concourse that features makers that have a front facing retail space with a manufacturing component – the addition of Doughnut Plant was a perfect fit,” said Michael Phillips, president of Jamestown. “We believe this model attracts a diverse mix of tenants from food purveyors to office and tech tenants, embodying the creativity in Long Island City and enhancing the environment of the neighborhood.”

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Photo courtesy of Jamestown 

The space will be the second production home for the company, which also has a 4,000-square-foot-space in the Lower East Side, and its first location in Queens.

The new facility will also include a retail component, which will be the third retail store for the company in the city. The retail portion is expected to open in December ahead of the rest of the facility, according to Jeff Magness, the company’s creative director. The production facility is scheduled to open in 2015.

DOughnuts 2

Established in 1994 by Mark Isreal, Doughnut Plant products are now sold at various retailers throughout the city, including at some Shake Shack and Dean and DeLuca locations.

The firm also opened a location in Japan in 2004, and has since expanded to nine spots in the Land of the Rising Sun, and one in Seoul, Korea.

But coming to Queens was part of the plan for a long time.

“Since Mark opened the Donughnut Plant, he has always wanted to be in all five boroughs,” Magness said. “We have been looking for a place to expand production and [Long Island City] was just the right mix. It was the right neighborhood and the space and the price was just right.”

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First Miss Queens Pageant to be held in Long Island City


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Angy Altamirano

Next year Miss America might be from Queens.

For the first time, the borough will have an official Miss America preliminary competition, called the Miss Queens Pageant, held on Oct. 12 at RESOBOX located at 41-26 27th St. in Long Island City.

The inaugural event, presented by the Miss Queens Scholarship Organization, is open to women, between 17 and 24 years old, who live, work or go to college in Queens and Long Island. The winner of the pageant will go on to compete for the title of Miss New York in spring 2015.

The pageant is divided into talent, interview, onstage and swimsuit/fitness portions. Potential contestants still have until Sept. 30 to sign up for the pageant.

“It’s something that the community really wanted,” said Shekinah Monee, executive director of the Miss Queens Scholarship Organization. “To have a borough that never had their own pageant, it was important to bring that to them, to let them have that sense of pride as well.”

Through the pageant, the newly formed Miss Queens Scholarship Organization will award scholarships to the women for undergraduate and graduate school, a tradition first started by the Miss America Organization, according to Monee.

As part of qualifying as a contestant, each young woman must raise at least $100 for the Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals, which are dedicated to raising funds and awareness to help enhance medical facilities and health care for sick and injured children.

Tickets for the Miss Queens Pageant are $15 prior to the show and $18 at the door.

For more information visit www.missqueensorg.wix.com/missqueensorg.

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Modern Spaces set to open new Astoria office in October


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Logo courtesy of Modern Spaces  

Modern Spaces is now batting six for six in the retail estate office game.

The firm, which Eric Benaim launched in Long Island City in 2008, announced Monday that it is opening its sixth location in six years and its second in Astoria in October, hoping to hit a home run with the area as it did with its original neighborhood.

In a recent interview with The Courier, Benaim said he sees tons of potential in Astoria, which has already begun to see an influx of new development, and is why the neighborhood was chosen for the new office at 34-16 30th Ave.

“We are very happy to expand our Astoria reach with this new office, and are proud to be part of this community,” Benaim said. “The timing is opportune for us, as we have three new projects in Astoria that will be hitting the market early next year.”

The new office will be about 2,000 square feet and will house 25 agents. It will also have an outdoor garden space for events.

Lifelong Astoria resident Greg Kyroglou, who is the current managing director of the first Astoria location at 29-20 23rd Ave., has been promoted to managing director of the new office. He will also run the original Astoria location as well.

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Home run at the Flea


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

IMG_6092

The LIC Flea & Food will hit a home run this weekend with a super sweet lineup.

First, the popular Long Island City market, located at the outdoor lot on the corner of Fifth Street and 46th Avenue, will continue to celebrate the opening of the LIC Flea Beer Garden.
Beer will be available for $2 from 4:30 to 5 p.m. with an LIC Flea purchase. The beer garden, which offers selections from SingleCut Beersmiths, Queens Brewery, Finback Brewery and Rockaway Brewing Company as well as wine, is set up along the basin in the back of the market with views of the Manhattan skyline and outdoor seating. Beer enthusiasts will also have the ability to meet the owners of the local breweries featured and learn about the beer-making process.

For sports lovers, former Mets player William Hayward “Mookie” Wilson will be at the flea market signing and promoting his book “Mookie: Life, Baseball, and the ’86 Mets.”

HGTV will be making its return the LIC Flea to film another episode of its show “Flea Market Flip” with host Lara Spencer, co-anchor on ABC’s “Good Morning America.”

Each week on the show, contestants, who participate in teams, are given $500 to explore items at different flea markets. The participants search for objects they can buy, fix and then “flip” for a higher selling price. By the end of each show, the contestants display their transformations and battle it out to win all the profits earned.

Finally, to end the weekend on a sweet note, the market will host a Sweets Festival with voting by judges and LIC Flea visitors to name the best sweets vendors. So far, participating vendors include A Spoonful of Brownies, Brookies Cookies, Bibingka-esk, Ice & Vice, Mom & Popsicles, Petalouda Bakery, Sweet Muse and Cassey’s Cookies & Cobblers.
LIC Flea & Food is open every Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and will run through the end of the year.

For more information visit www.licflea.com or www.facebook.com/licflea.

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Silvercup Studios seeking permit approvals again for delayed expansion


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Renderings courtesy Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners LLP

The stalled Silvercup West development, a planned $1 billion expansion of Silvercup Studios in Long Island City just south of the Queensboro Bridge, is back in the spotlight — for special permit renewals.

The land use committee of Community Board 2 is reviewing the application and is expected to bring the matter to a full board vote in the next public meeting on Oct. 2.

The permits are for various design elements in the project, including a proposed 1,400-space parking garage, which was granted three years ago, but has expired since.

A representative for Silvercup at a recent community board committee meeting said they expect to get the approvals quickly without issues, because of past consents.

The Silvercup West plan first debuted about eight years ago with tons of media coverage. The project includes eight new soundstage studios as part of a larger 2.2 million-square-foot complex containing an office tower, high-rise apartment towers with 1,000 residences, retail space, a catering hall and cultural space.

The community board, the borough president, City Planning and the City Council all gave their blessings for the land use case of the project in 2006, and it was supposed to be completed by 2010, according to published reports.

However, the project is being held up by New York Power Authority (NYPA) generators on the site, which have to be decommissioned and removed. The generators, which have 150-foot smoke stacks on each one, are sitting on three acres of land.

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Silvercups’ plan to restore the near century-old landmarked terracotta building at 42-10 Vernon Blvd. have been proceeding well, according to a spokesman, and other plans are seeing movement as well, but the generators are stopping progression.

“We have worked with DEC on getting plans approved for remediation, and have gotten Army Corps approval to install a new bulkhead,” spokesman Russ Colchamiro said. “However, we cannot proceed with the project unitl the NYPA generators are removed.”

If the permits are renewed by the board, the application moves to City Planning for review.

View more renderings and information for the project here.

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LIC woman co-creates web series on living in New York City apartments


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of "Common Charges"

One new web series is opening the doors to what it is like to be a tenant in a New York City apartment building.

“Common Charges,” co-created by actors Alison Whitney from Long Island City and Jonathan Zipper of Manhattan, is a series that follows six couples living in a fictional building called The Breaston.

In approximately five-minute confessional-style episodes, the series shows the reactions each pair has to the building’s policies, rules, problems and neighbors.

“It was a unique story we needed to tell, with plenty of ‘only in New York’ experiences to draw from,” Whitney said.

The tenants include a gay couple, a man and his mail-order bride, newlyweds, “unlikely besties,” an on-again, off-again couple and the building’s superintendent, according to creators, who also star in the series.

Krista and Dan

“In New York City you have all sorts of people coming together and living together,” said Whitney, who has lived in a Long Island City condominium for eight years.

Both Whitney and Zipper said they used their own experiences of living in apartment buildings to create “Common Charges” and relate to viewers.

“New York City is so densely populated and everyone lies on top of one another,” said Zipper, who grew up living in apartments his whole life and believes it has been an integral part of who he has grown up to be. “Everyone’s bound to form an opinion on everyone and everything in the building.”

All seven episodes of the series, described as “an improvised comedy about big personalities living in small spaces,” were filmed in May at a hotel in Manhattan.

“For us, we really want people to connect with the concept and feel a little bit, ‘Yeah, I’ve been there,’” Zipper said.


The series will premiere at the 9th Annual Independent Television and Film Festival (ITVFest) in Vermont later this month and then be shown at the Miami Web Fest in October. It has also been selected for the ATL Web Fest in Atlanta.

The creators said they are currently working on a plan to have an official release of the episodes.

For more information, visit www.facebook.com/CommonChargesTV or follow @CommonCharges on Twitter.

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First Queens Art Intervention Day to offer interactive projects throughout borough


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photos by RPGA Studios

Communities throughout Queens are set for an artistic intervention, looking to inspire, educate and empower residents and feed the pulse of the borough.

The nonprofit studio Rego Park Green Alliance, which uses creative methods to address community issues, will host the first Queens Art Intervention Day on Sept. 27 throughout the borough from Long Island City to the Rockaways.

“We see something that we are not happy with and we try to think about how we can fix it in a creative way,” said Yvonne Shortt, who started the studio and is currently the executive director.

The day-long event, which has a rain date for Oct. 4, will feature a total of 30 projects including murals, art installations, performance pieces, hands-on programs, and many more creative activities taking place outdoors in Astoria, LIC, Kew Gardens, Elmhurst, Rego Park, Forest Hills, Jackson Heights, Ozone Park, Ridgewood, Laurelton, Corona, Whitestone and the Rockaways.

QAIposter6

“We want our borough to be seen as a place that people want to come and do interesting things,” Shortt said. “We hope this will help Queens continue to grow and continue to thrive and not just have one spot thought of as artistic and creative.”

According to Shortt, along with being visually appealing, the pieces will also serve to bring about change and to get community members thinking about certain issues.

For example, posters for one project called “Stat Girl” depict a super hero displaying statistics on traffic accidents that have occurred on Queens Boulevard in the past two years. The posters will be put up all day down the thoroughfare.

stat girl photo by RPGA Studios

“We would love for people to stop and engage,” Shortt said. “It’s really about the communities themselves to find some inspiration and advocate for better communities.”

Shortt said that although there were over 160 submissions this year, funding, provided solely by Shortt, only allowed for 25 projects to be part of the event. In the future, she hopes to expand the event to more days and many more communities in the borough.

“There’s an active pulse throughout the borough of Queens and I’m very excited to help it move forward. I feel that if you have ideas and are willing to push it forward, that Queens is a very inviting borough.” Shortt said. “We’re showing the vitality of Queens.”

For more information and the full list of projects for Queens Art Intervention Day, click here.

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TF Cornerstone fully leases final LIC waterfront building


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of TF Cornerstone

TF Cornerstone’s sixth and final building overlooking the waterfront along Center Boulevard in Long Island City is fully leased, just five months after it began welcoming residents.

The real estate firm announced Monday that the 26-story luxury tower 4610 Center Boulevard, known for curving around the iconic Pepsi-Cola sign, filled its 584 units, which range from studios to three-bedroom apartments.

More than 6,000 people now call the TF Cornerstone buildings on the LIC waterfront (comprising 2,615 rental units and 184 condominiums on Center Boulevard) home, according to the company.

“We’ve spent the last 12 years not only building and leasing buildings along the LIC waterfront, but also immersing ourselves in the community and growing to love the neighborhood just as much as our residents do,” said Sofia Estevez, executive vice president for TF Cornerstone. “The lease-up of this building is a true testament to the vibrancy of this area, and we look forward to our next chapter of development in LIC.”

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Identify this place in Queens


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

where

Do you know where in Queens this photo was taken? Guess by commenting below! The answer will be revealed next week.

Last week’s answer to “Identify this Place”: Pier 1 at Gantry Plaza State Park in Long Island CIty

DSC_0441-624x473

Q&A: Modern Spaces CEO explains real estate in LIC


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Donna Dotan Photography Inc.

Eric Benaim founded real estate firm Modern Spaces in Long Island City in 2008, and within a handful of years led the explosion of residential interest in the neighborhood. Over the years, he expanded the company from LIC to Astoria, Manhattan and Brooklyn, and recently, Modern Spaces announced the launching of its commercial and investment property division, tapping into another side of the market.

In a question-and-answer session with The Courier, Benaim explained the current status of real estate in Long Island City and the transformation of the neighborhood.

Courier: How did you get inspired to start working in Long Island City?

Benaim: I guess I was always a Queens boy, and I started focusing in LIC back in 2005. I was a broker focusing mostly in Manhattan and at the time there were pretty much no brokers in the neighborhood over here, so I figured I would try to make this my niche. Just walking around you see the views of Manhattan, you see there’s a lot of potential over here and I stuck with it, and obviously it paid off. The neighborhood has changed dramatically since 2005.

Courier: Did you really think it [the transformation of LIC] would happen so quickly?

Benaim: No. Literally, from my window I see cranes everywhere, and it’s just crazy to see my skyline changing every day.

Courier: What is the real estate market in LIC like now?

Benaim: There is a lot of development. There was not that many condos being developed over the last couple of years, but condos are about to come back strong. We are seeing a lot of condo projects that are going to be coming online probably by first and second quarter of next year. And in regards to rental projects, a lot developers are doing stuff now whereas before it was predominately TF Cornerstone and Rockrose. now you are seeing a lot of big developers coming into the neighborhood that were never here before.

Courier: Why do you think there is a switch from rentals to condos?

Benaim: Because land prices have gone up a lot and when land prices go up so much it just doesn’t make sense to do a rental because the return on your investment does not really pay out. So it just makes more sense financially to do a condo rather than a rental. Rental projects that are coming along, these are projects sites that were acquired probably a year or more ago when land prices were a little more affordable than they are now.

Courier: Is LIC already a successful live, work and play community?

Benaim: I think [live, work, and play] has been established here. I remember when I first started showing clients around the neighborhood, there really wasn’t anything here. Not even a supermarket. Now we have three supermarkets already, and a fourth is opening up at the LINC, the Rockrose project in Court Square. There are a whole lot of restaurants— you know, restaurants open up here every week and now we are seeing more and more boutiques and stores opening up. Pretty much everything you need is here now. And regarding play, so we do have the bars and the night life now and LIC is a huge cultural destination. We have the LIC Arts Open, the Taste of LIC, MoMA PS1, the Chocolate Factory Theater and the LIC Flea. So there’s really a lot to do as well.

Courier: What has spurred you to go into the commercial side?

Benaim: We’ve done a little commercial these past few years, mostly like retail leasing. But a lot of our clients, whether it’s landlords who we’re doing their rentals for in walk-ups or if it’s a developer who we’re marketing their building or working with them, they never really came to us in the past, because they knew us as being residential brokers. So it was kind of like business that we lost out on. And it just seemed like the right time. Queens as a whole is in the spotlight right now and there’s not really a commercial company that can offer commercial services but still insight in the residential market.

Courier: What is the next neighborhood that has potential?

Benaim: We do see a lot of potential in Astoria, and other areas like Woodside, Sunnyside, Flushing and areas like Rego Park, where we just opened up a building called The Rego Modern. We rented 10 in the first open house [at The Rego Modern] and for high prices also, which they weren’t used to seeing. So that just shows that there is a lot of interest in Queens. Being a Queens boy myself it’s just nice to see that Queens is getting the spotlight that Brooklyn had stolen from us.

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Report: Queens rental prices drop in August


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Charts courtesy of MNS Real Estate 

The fluctuating Queens rental market saw a decrease in prices in August, after increases in July, according to the “Queens Rental Market Report” by MNS Real Estate.

Average rents throughout the borough dropped 3.74 percent from $2,113 in July to $2,034 in August, the report stated.

The report focused on several neighborhoods, including Long Island City, Astoria, Ridgewood, Flushing, Rego Park, Forest Hills and Jackson Heights.

The biggest changes occurred in studio apartments in Ridgewood, where prices dropped 43.5 percent — about $848 — to $1,100, the least expensive rental price for any type of apartment in the borough. The average price of a studio in the borough is $1,550, according to the report.

Studios page

Also, two-bedroom units in Jackson Heights dipped 26.12 percent to $1,841 from $2,494 in July, a decrease of $653.

“Smaller neighborhoods in Queens are seeing slower progression, however more new developments are scheduled to open their doors in the coming months offering high-end amenities and exceptional convenience,” the report said. “As is evident from the overall decrease in prices this month Queens is expected to have up and down monthly fluctuations, but long-term projections have prices increasing steadily.”

Flushing had the largest decrease in overall average rents with 7.47 percent. Two-bedroom units in Flushing experienced a fall of 17.8 percent from $2,599 in July to $2,136 in August.

The biggest increase was in Ridgewood, where prices for one-bedroom apartments rose 15.3 percent or $260 to $1,960.

Prices in Astoria and Long Island City remained fairly stable, although dropped slightly, according to the report.

Click here to view the full report.

 

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Former Community Board 2 district manager Dolores Rizzotto passes away


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Rizzotto family

Dolores Rizzotto, former district manager of Community Board 2 for more than 15 years, died Thursday after a battle with cancer, according to CB2 chair Joseph Conley.

Rizzotto, who chaired CB2 for more than 15 years, was 70.

“Dolores served the City of New York in many capacities but none so important as her role in our community as district manager,” Conley said. “Dolores worked tirelessly to improve the quality of life for so many. Dolores will be sorely missed for her wisdom, compassion, sense of humor and leadership. Dolores was a true friend to all and an expert in helping so many.”

Rizzotto, a lifelong Corona resident who recently moved to Florida, retired in 2006 from CB2, which serves Long Island City, Woodside and Sunnyside. Rizzotto would travel back and forth between Queens and Florida visiting family and friends.

She is survived by her two sons, Michael and Robert, and two grandchildren, Anthony and Thomas.

A wake will be held at Edward Guida Funeral Home, located at 47-20 104th St. in Corona. Visitations hours will be Sept. 18 from 7 to 9 p.m., and Sept. 19 from 2 to 5 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. The funeral mass will be on Sept. 20 at 10:45 a.m. at St. Leo’s Roman Catholic Church, located at 104-05 49th Ave. Rizzotto will be buried at Mount Saint Mary Cemetery in Flushing.

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