Tag Archives: Long Island City

Community expresses mixed feelings on city-commissioned sculpture in LIC


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photo by Angy Altamirano

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. But for one community in Long Island City, a bright pink statue that would stand more than 8 feet tall just might not fit their vision of beauty.

At the recent Community Board 2 meeting, the city’s Department of Cultural Affairs presented the newest project for the Percent for Art program that is being commissioned for Jackson Avenue and 43rd Avenue.

Since 1982, the city’s Percent for Art law has required that one percent of the budget for eligible city-funded construction projects be spent on public artwork.

For this commission, a panel convened by the agency selected Brooklyn-artist Ohad Meromi and at the Dec. 4 board meeting, the community got a preview of what is being proposed for the Long Island City site.

Meromi’s proposed sculpture is an 8.5-foot-tall, bright pink piece called “The Sunbather” which is shaped as a human figure. About $515,000 of city tax dollars will go toward the construction of the piece, made of bronze.

Although Meromi said he is “excited for the opportunity” to sculpt the piece, community board members and residents at the meeting brought up issues such as the community at large not having had the opportunity to give their input on the sculpture earlier and also the color just being a little too much.

“I personally do like the art,” said Moitri Chowdhury Savard, a community board member. “But I think the bright pink color and the size of it has been brought up by many residents of the community as too much for the area. I think it might be a little too much for a lot of the residents there.”

Resident Christian Amez, also a member of the organization Hunters Point Parks Conservancy, said he also wished the community could have been more well-represented earlier in the process. They also would have liked it if a local artist could have been chosen.

According to Sarah Reisman, director for Percent for Art, the agency presented a rough draft of a rendering to the community board’s land use committee first, and members of the board were invited.

Reisman also added that about 40 artists, including local Long Island City artists, were presented to a panel that later picked finalists. After finalists presented proposals, Meromi, who has presented pieces at the SculptureCenter and MoMA PS1, was chosen.

The sculpture’s size and color are still not finalized, but a permanent piece by Meromi is expected to be located at the site.

“I really thought the site could use color,” Meromi said about the color selection of the sculpture. “I think pink is bold and the site could use something bold.”

Now the agency will take the comments from residents and the community board comments and go back to the renderings of the sculpture. Then, the agency will present a conceptual design to the public design commission at City Hall.

“We want to know what you think, take it to consideration and take it to the design commission,” Reisman said. “We’re here to listen.”

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Partially developed controversial Dutch Kills hotel for sale


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Rendering courtesy of Massey Knakal

The owner of a controversial, partially constructed hotel in Dutch Kills is selling the structure.

Residents protested and even sued to stop construction of the nine-story boutique hotel on 39-35 27th St. in the Long Island City neighborhood in 2010, according to published reports.

But now, with more than 20 new hotels opened over the last five years, the area has become a hot hotel market, and owner Steven Baharestani of Dutch Kills Partners LLC is hoping to sell the yet-to-be completed hotel to the highest bidder.

“The offering presents a unique opportunity to acquire a full or partial interest in a hotel in the construction phase, in one of the most rapidly developing hotel markets in the New York metro area,” said Andrew Posil, director of sales at Massey Knakalwhich is marketing the building.

Construction on the hotel is one-third complete, according to the real estate firm. It will be 38,000 square feet and have 79 rooms when finished.

Baharestani is looking for the best possible offer for the hotel, and there isn’t an asking price for the building, a Massey Knakal representative said.

The Buildings Department originally approved plans for the hotel back in 2007.

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Less than a week remaining to apply for Hunter’s Point South


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Related Companies 

Soon thousands of people will learn if they missed out on one of the city’s top housing opportunities.

But for those who haven’t signed up yet, there is less than one week remaining to apply for the lottery for affordable housing at the Hunter’s Point South buildings.

The 60-day period for accepting applications will end on Monday, Dec. 15, for the two new buildings on the Long Island City waterfront — 32-story Hunter’s Point South Crossing and 37-story Hunter’s Point South Commons.

Just two weeks after the lottery application process kicked off in October about 25,000 hopeful residents had signed up to obtain the 925 units, according to published reports.

Those still looking to apply should do so through the city’s Housing Connect website or by submitting a paper application. After the application process closes, the lottery will begin and selected applicants will be notified early next year.

The buildings will reserve 50 percent of the apartments for people living within Community Board 2, 7 percent for those with mobility or hearing disabilities or those who are visually impaired, and 5 percent for city employees.

There are 186 units, or about 20 percent, for low-income individuals and families, and 738 apartments are available for moderate- and middle-income tenants.

Studio, one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments will be available for all income levels. Low-income rental prices start from $494 for a studio and max out at $959 per month for a three-bedroom, while eligible incomes range from about $19,000 to approximately $49,000 annually. Rents for middle and moderate-income units range from $1,561 to $4,346 per month for household incomes of $55,200 to $224,020 annually.

The buildings feature many amenities, including an urban farm, outdoor terraces, fitness facilities, tech centers, bike storage, party rooms, laundry rooms and a parking garage. Both buildings will have 24-hour lobby attendants.

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LaGuardia Community College breaks ground on library expansion


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer's Office

LaGuardia Community College has launched a project that will give students at the Long Island City campus more room to conduct research and study.

Representatives of LaGuardia Community College and CUNY, as well as faculty and students, gathered on Dec. 5 to break ground on a project to renovate and expand the college’s library.

“LaGuardia Community College has a successful track record improving the lives and economic opportunities for countless sons and daughters of immigrants who continue to attend this world-class institution,” said Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer, who secured $2 million in funding for the library expansion. “Together with this significant investment we will ensure more students are given a state-of-the-art facility they need to enhance their academic experience.”

Van’s Bramer’s funding will help renovate, expand and modernize the library by creating an open plan allowing better access for students and faculty.

During the renovations, which are expected to be completed by the fall of 2016, 17,000 square feet of the library’s 31,000-square-foot first floor will be rebuilt and the remaining space will be upgraded.

Students and faculty will be able to walk through a new entrance into an open space where natural light will be allowed to shine into the building.

The renovation will expand the library to the E-Building’s second floor. The college’s Humanities Department was moved to the C-Building to make room for the expansion.

Rendering courtesy of LaGuardia Community College

Rendering courtesy of LaGuardia Community College

“We are excited to embark on the construction project that will expand the existing library space,” said Shahir Erfan, LaGuardia’s vice president of administration. “The new space will leverage architectural/engineering design to promote learning and student engagement and the technology upgrades will enhance the student experience.”

Among the upgrades and renovations are expanded circulation, reference and periodical areas. There will also be a new 1,600-square-foot information commons to help visitors access information with printed materials and technology. The library will also feature four brand-new 800-square-foot open study rooms and a 450-square-foot meeting room. Two new 1,200-square-foot  computer labs will be added to the current 750-square-foot lab.

“To us students, the library is our sanctuary, to study, do homework and be academically active,” said Katherine Gutierrez, a student at LaGuardia and Student Government Association governor of political awareness. “More books and more space is what we need. We have waited for this renovation, and it will provide us exactly that.”

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Crime down in the 108th Precinct


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Scott Bintner/PropertyShark

With just three weeks under his belt as the new commanding officer of the 108th Precinct, Captain John Travaglia had some good news to share with the community.

At Community Board 2’s monthly meeting on Thursday night, along with introducing himself to board members and the audience, Travaglia said they have seen a decrease in crime in the precinct covering Long Island City, Sunnyside, Woodside and Maspeth.

In the last 28 days, robberies have been down 8 percent, felony assaults 9 percent, burglaries 6 percent, grand larceny 15 percent, and stolen cars have been down 50 percent, according to Travaglia.

“We’re heading in the right direction. I can’t make promises that it will always stay that way but I hope it does. I hope I can keep up the good work,” Travaglia said at the meeting. “I credit a lot of this reduction to Brian Hennessy and the policies he had in place, and I look forward to continuing those efforts.”

Travaglia replaced Captain Brian Hennessy, who on Nov. 6 became the commanding officer of the 115th Precinct. Before becoming the new top dog at the 108th Precinct, Travaglia was at the 114th Precinct, and before that at the 104th Precinct.

“One of the best holiday Christmas presents I ever got was being assigned to the 108th Precinct,” Travaglia said. “I took over the 108th Precinct from Captain Hennessy. He did a wonderful job. He left me with a well-oiled machine. Our men and women are working very hard and very efficiently, and I just hope I can continue it. It’s pretty big footsteps to follow in.”

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CB 2 names new chair, executive board members


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Angy Altamirano

With tears in his eyes, Joseph Conley said goodbye to the position he has held for close to three decades as he handed over the reins at Community Board 2 on Thursday night.

Conley officially announced at the December Community Board 2 monthly meeting that he would be stepping down as chair of the board. He gave the news to board members two days before the meeting via a letter.

“It’s been a great honor for me, a great privilege to be a voice of the community board and in some cases the face of the community board,” Conley said during the meeting. “There is no other reason to say other than it’s time.”

Patrick O’Brien, who previously held the position of second vice chair and has been a member of the board for 13 years, was voted as the new chair of Community Board 2.

Although he is stepping down from his position as chair of the board, which covers Sunnyside, Woodside, Long Island City and a part of Maspeth, Conley will finish his term as a board member, which ends in April.

“I have made lifelong friends in this room, people that I have shared my life, my family and you will remain all my friends,” Conley said while tearing up. The members of the board and audience cheered and gave him a standing ovation.

Conley said he joined the board because of the issue of the “squeegee men,” who would attempt to clean car windows on the side of the road at Queens Plaza. Since then he said he has seen each community flourish in its own unique way.

When thinking of his proudest moment of being part of the board, he said it had to be the community’s input for the new Hunter’s Point South Park in Long Island City and helping to come up with affordable housing in that area.

“It’s tough, it’s really tough only from the sense of the inspiration you get every day from people, trying to help people, making a difference — so it’s very hard,” Conley said. “I’m very happy for Pat. He will be a dynamic leader. He’s very thoughtful, and he has a good grasp of the issues in the community, so he will do a great job.”

Along with voting for a new chair, the executive board members decided to also put forth a new “slate” and vote on a new first and second vice chairman, secretary and treasurer. The decision was initially met with opposition from some board members, who said they felt it was too soon to be asked to vote, especially with only knowing two days before that Conley would be leaving.

However, after going back and forth, the members voted and the new executive board was chosen.

“It’s going to take some time to get the lay of the land even having been on the executive board. There are things that the chairman, particularly this chairman, has done that are going to be hard to duplicate, but you find your way and in a couple of months you do your own thing,” O’Brien said.

The new executive board consists of Stephen Cooper continuing as first vice chair, Lisa Deller going from secretary to second vice chair, Diane Ballek staying as treasurer, and Denise Keehan Smith becoming the new secretary.

O’Brien, who is a lifelong Long Island City resident, said he plans to continue the focus on key community issues, such as quality of life, transportation and development.

“We still have all the same issues. We’re going to miss Joe, but we’re not going to stop working towards all of those [issues]. The good news is that he’ll still be around,” O’Brien said. “We have more issues than answers, but that’s why we’ll work on it.”

Community Board 2’s next meeting will be on Jan. 8, 2015.

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Santa Claus comes to the LIC Flea


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

DSC_0561-624x416

Santa Claus is coming to town this weekend at the LIC Flea & Food.

Father Christmas will be at the popular Long Island City flea market, which made its move to the warehouse connected to the original outdoor lot on the corner of Fifth Street and 46th Avenue, starting this weekend and going through the rest of the season.

Every Saturday and Sunday through Dec. 21, there will be free pictures with Santa for all kids, and also those who are still children at heart.

The LIC Flea Holiday Market includes two floors of a mix of LIC Flea favorite vendors and new faces. There are also two special boutique spots in the inner building. Shoppers will be able to find something for everyone on their lists just in time for the holidays.

The market will also be filled with music this weekend with DJ Johnny Seriuss spinning tunes on Saturday and Dandy Wellington and His Band performing on Sunday.

The LIC Flea Beer Garden also remains open on the second floor of the warehouse. The beer garden offers wine and beer selections from local breweries SingleCut Beersmiths, Queens Brewery, Finback Brewery and Rockaway Brewing Company. Drink specials including $2 beer and $3 wine are available from 4 to 5 p.m.

The LIC Flea Holiday Market is open every Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information visit www.licflea.com or www.facebook.com/licflea.

Here are some vendors to check out the next time you visit the popular indoor Long Island City flea market.

1. Art on Post-it Notes
www.jacksartonpostitnotes.com
Jack Maiorino has been using Post-it Notes as his art medium for the past 10 years. He draws from photos that he takes of images and locations he has visited. He has been commissioned to do portraits, pets and homes. He also creates tattoo designs. This is his first season exhibiting at the LIC market.

2. Originals by Yarn Painting
www.originalsbyyarnpaintings.com
Knitting became designer Kathleen Shanteau’s therapy while waiting through chemotherapy after her mom was diagnosed with lung cancer and after her mother’s passing. Felting led her on a journey of color, design and texture. Going green and converting material into awesome powerful colors and designs took her to what she calls her “Happy Place.” Doggie Shrugs were designed because her Morkies hated their legs in sweater sleeves. Now cozy in their shrugs, they hate to take them off!

3. Birdhouse Jewelry
www.birdhousejewelry.com
Since 2005 Birdhouse Jewelry has offered on-trend, well-made jewelry at great prices ranging from $15 to $50. Pieces include USA state charm necklaces, initials, and lots of delicate, simple silver and gold jewelry. The jewelry is perfect for giving as a gift — every purchase comes with free, cute gift boxing. Free shipping includes giftwrap and tracking.

4. Cassey’s Cookies & Cobblers, LLC
www.facebook.com/casseyscookiesandcobblers
Cassey’s Cookies & Cobblers LLC is based out of Long Island City’s Entrepreneur Space (E-space) kitchen located at 36-46 47th St. Established in August 2013, it was born of the proprietor’s lifelong love for baking. Cassey has been baking since she was 7 years old and has yet to put down the rolling pin. Those who have tasted the mouth-watering products on the ground floor know that her business will be around for a long time to come. America’s collective sweet tooth is in capable hands.

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Joseph Conley turning over reins of CB2 after decades of leadership


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photo by Angy Altamirano

An era is coming to an end Thursday night as a longtime community board chair is stepping down after nearly three decades of volunteer service.

Joseph Conley, who has been chairman of Community Board 2 (CB2) for almost 29 years, announced to board members via a letter Wednesday that it is time for him to hand over the reins, according to Sheila Lewandowski, CB2 member. 

“For a lot of us it was a surprise,” Lewandowski said. “He has really done an incredible job.”

Although he is stepping down from his position as chair of the community board, which covers Sunnyside, Woodside, Long Island City and a part of Maspeth, Conley will finish his term on the board as a member.  He is expected to make the official announcement during the board’s monthly meeting on Thursday night. 

Conley’s decision to step down comes as the western Queens neighborhoods serviced by the community board are going through major developments. 

“Community chair is a very tough job, what you do is for the most part unnoticed and unappreciated and he operated at the best interest of the community,” Lewandowski said. 

Lewandowski also added that this changing of the guard serves as an opportunity to open up the spot to other people and also possibly change the dynamic of the overall board. 

“I know there is conversation on whether we should just go for the most likely candidate right now or take a moment to absorb that we will not have Joe and then look around the room,” she said. “I think people are still digesting the fact that Joe won’t be at the helm anymore.”

The community board will be holding an election for officer positions, including chairman, first and vice chairman, secretary and treasurer, at its monthly meeting Thursday night at 7 p.m. at Sunnyside Community Service, located at 43-31 39th St. 

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Brooklyn plumbing company moving to LIC  


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Kalmon Dolgin Affiliates

A Brooklyn-based plumbing, heating and fire protection company is taking the plunge and moving to Queens.

General Plumbing Corporation signed a lease for a 12,000-square-foot space in a Long Island City building, according to Kalmon Dolgin Affiliates (KDA), which arranged the deal.

The property, located at 54-01 35th St., had an asking rent of $21 per square foot and fits the firm because it’s not far from its clients in Manhattan.

“The company needed to relocate from its location in Williamsburg and wanted to stay within close proximity to Manhattan to service its clients,” said Jeff Unger of KDA, who represented both the landlord ROM Realty and the tenant. “54-01 35th Street’s ideal location adjacent to the Long Island Expressway, Queens Midtown Tunnel, and 59th Street and Williamsburg bridges was the perfect fit.”

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Long Island City parking lot to be converted into 428-unit residential tower


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Map via Bing Maps

The trend of converting parking facilities into new sites for residential development has reached Alert Garage Corp.’s massive lot in Long Island City.

The owner of the parking garage, which takes up nearly one block, filed permits with the Department of Buildings on Wednesday to construct a new 10-story mixed-use residential and commercial tower on the site of the lot.

The property at 30-17 40th Ave. will be developed into a new, mostly residential building with more than 290,000 square feet and 428 units, according to city records.

GKV Architects will be designing the new tower, which will have 214 parking spaces — meeting city requirements based on zoning regulations for the area. The site, however, is located adjacent to the 39th Avenue N and Q subway station, giving future residents easy access to transportation.

Nearly 3,200 square feet in the new structure will be set aside for commercial space, according to the filings.

The site’s 83,000-square-foot floor area contains an existing one-story building, which occupies about a fifth of the lot. The filings indicate the new structure will be developed on the entire site, meaning that the one-story building will be demolished if plans are met.

Demolition permits have yet to be filed.

One-story building

The one-story building at the site. (Photo courtesy of Scott Bintner/PropertyShark)

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Black Friday specials at the LIC Flea


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

DSC_0560

Even with Black Friday over, you’ll still have enough time to catch some amazing sales at the LIC Flea Holiday Market this weekend.

Many vendors at the popular Long Island City flea market, which made its move to the warehouse connected to the original outdoor lot on the corner of Fifth Street and 46th Avenue, will be offering Black Friday deals on unique, handcrafted and curated items.

Every Saturday and Sunday through Dec. 21, the indoor holiday market will include two floors of a mix of LIC Flea favorite vendors and new faces. There are also two special boutique spots in the inner building. Shoppers will be able to find something for everyone on their lists.

This weekend will be the last time shoppers can enter the LIC Flea Black Friday challenge. Those who show $100 or more worth of receipts from the LIC Flea from the month of November will have a chance to win $100 in Flea Bucks to be spent in December. See www.facebook.com/licflea for how to enter.

The LIC Flea Beer Garden also remains open on the second floor of the warehouse. The beer garden offers wine and beer selections from local breweries SingleCut Beersmiths, Queens Brewery, Finback Brewery and Rockaway Brewing Company. Drink specials including $2 beer and $3 wine are available from 4 to 5 p.m.

There will be great events in the weekends to come such as Lego building, cupcake making, pictures with Santa Claus and much more.

The LIC Flea Holiday Market is open every Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information visit www.licflea.com or www.facebook.com/licflea.

Here are some vendors to check out the next time you visit the popular indoor Long Island City flea market.

Lost Candor
www.lostcandor.com
Lost Candor specializes in curated handmade, vintage, one-of-a-kind accessories, women’s fashion, and home decor items from around the world for seekers of unique lifestyle essentials. Their mission is to bring exceptional items made with great skill and detail to their customers and their homes while also promoting intangible cultural heritage and preserving the craft of artisan communities. They seek out items from cultures with long traditions of quality, skilled craftsmanship, product integrity, aesthetics and intricate details.

Maggie & Moose
www.maggiemoose.com
www.etsy.com/shop/MaggieandMoose
Maggie & Moose creates handmade dog apparel and accessories, including reversible fleece coats, rain coats, T-shirts, leashes and collars. Much of their line is made by up-cycling and repurposing existing human clothing into dog apparel. For example, leashes and collars are made from men’s ties. Additionally, Maggie & Moose offers custom sizing, so each garment fits perfectly. They can also personalize each shirt by adding a dog’s name or cute phrase. Everything is handmade by owners Lauren and Maranda. One dollar of every sale is donated to dog rescue organizations. For all of November and December, the featured charity is Broadway Barks, founded by Bernadette Peters and Mary Tyler Moore.

Krista Stained Glass
www.etsy.com/shop/KristaStainedGlass
Krista Stained Glass is an Astoria-based shop and is making its debut at the LIC Flea & Food this holiday season. This is a one-woman shop. Krista’s love of stained glass started at the Smith Museum of Stained Glass Windows in Chicago leading her to take a class at Fredrick Stained Glass. She has been building stained glass items ever since.

Soul Socks
www.soul-socks.com
Launched in 2013, Soul Socks is quickly gaining traction with success both in stores and online. They make whimsical dress socks uniquely designed in New York and made of Peruvian Pima Cotton. Soul Socks started as a subscription sock club featured in The New York Times. They offer LIC visitors a fantastic deal of 1 sock for $10 or 3 for $25.

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Man struck with brick during attempted robbery at Court Square ATM: cops


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

An attacker used a brick stuffed into a pink stocking to hit a man in the head after he refused to hand over his cash at a Long Island City ATM, police said.

The 32-year-old victim was withdrawing money inside the vestibule area of the 1 Court Square Citibank about 4:15 a.m. on Monday when the suspect approached him, authorities said.

The suspect, while holding the stocking with the brick inside of it, then demanded money from the man.

When the victim would not hand over his cash, the suspect swung the brick at the man and struck him in the head, according to police. He fled without taking any money.

The victim refused medical attention.

Police describe the suspect as about 5 feet 8 inches tall and 230 pounds. He was last seen wearing a black hat and black jacket.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

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New mixed-use LIC building at Vernon Boulevard partially revealed


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Liam La Guerre

Construction work has already begun for a new mixed-use building at the corner of 50th Avenue and Vernon Boulevard in Long Island City, and now there’s a clearer picture of what the structure will look like.

IMG953832

Blueprints of the forthcoming building at 49-18 Vernon Blvd. have been posted on the construction fence.

Based on its blueprints, the OAPD Architecture-designed building’s façade will be comprised of a glass and stone design, and there will be ground-floor retail at the property.

The new building will be a five-story, 15-unit residential structure, according to filings with the Department of Buildings. About 4,450 square feet has been set aside for the retail component in the building.

Photo courtesy of Scott Bintner/PropertyShark

49-18 Vernon Blvd. Photo courtesy of Scott Bintner/PropertyShark

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Large day care center coming to Arris Lofts in LIC


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre 

In the latest sign that Long Island City is becoming more and more family friendly, a new day care center will be moving into luxury condo building Arris Lofts, according to multiple sources.

The new day care center will fill 17,000 square feet of vacant space in the ground floor of the building at 27-28 Thomson Ave., which has about 237 residential units throughout eight floors. Sources confirmed the day care center signing, but couldn’t provide further details at this time about the lease or when the business plans to open.

The Long Island City area has seen an influx of residential development over the past few years, which has brought many families into the area, causing a need for facilities, such as day care centers, according to real estate experts in the neighborhood.

Within the past five years, there have been more than 4,000 residential units added to the area, said real estate firm Modern Spaces CEO Eric Benaim, and there are plans for about 10,000 more in the next five years.

“I think a day care center is much needed in that part of town,” Benaim said. “There are day care centers on the waterfront, but having one to serve the Court Square area is really good.”

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LIC Clock Tower and vacant site sell for $77M


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Scott Bintner/PropertyShark

Those looking to preserve the Long Island City Clock Tower may be running out of time.

Queens Plaza Park Development LLC bought the tower, which was the former Bank of Manhattan building, and an adjoining vacant site for a combined $77 million, according to property records filed with the city on Saturday.

Community members are hoping to landmark the building on 29-27 Queens Plaza North to avoid its development, according to recently published reports, after LIC Clock Tower LLC bought the tower in May for $15 million, city records show.

In just a few months, the price of the tower doubled and sold for $30.9 million. The buyer also purchased the vacant land at 29-37 41st Ave. for $46.3 million.

The vacant site has more than 205,000 buildable square feet. Queens-based developer Steve Cheung purchased the vacant site for $8 million in 2011, city records show, and last year he filed with the Department of Buildings for a 30-story residential tower with 242 units at the vacant site.

Plans for the Clock Tower site have yet to be filed with the Buildings Department.

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