Tag Archives: Long Island City

Selling point: LIC Wills Group building sold for $43.5M — and more big sales


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Scott Bintner/Propertyshark

A number of properties in Queens sold for big prices recently, according to city property records. Here’s a run down of interesting transactions over the past week.

Address: 43-01 21st St.
Price: $43,500,000

The Wills Group Family Limited Partnership sold its commercial building in Long Island City at 43-01 21st St. for $43.5 million, according to city property filings recorded on Friday. The property is a three-story building with more than 120,000 square feet of space. The buyer is listed as Chicago-based 43-01 21st Street Eat LLC, although developer Rockrose was in contract for it last year, according to a published report.

Address: 55-02 Broadway
Price: $9,000,000

Manhattan-based 55 Broadway Realty LLC picked up this mixed-use office and factory building in Woodside for $9 million, according to city records. The one-story building has just over 30,000 square feet of space.

Address: 5 Court Square/28-24 Jackson Ave.
Price: $15,750,000

This building, which sits across the street from the Citibank Building in Long Island City, was in high demand because of its developmental potential in a hot neighborhood. At nearly 8,000 square feet, current zoning laws allow a future development to be nearly eight times bigger. AF Court Square LLC sold the building to Jackson 2524 LLC, a Great Neck-based firm, which filed to construct a mixed-use residential and commercial 11-story building with 73 units on the site last year. The project was disapproved by the Buildings Department.

 

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Real estate investors shelled out $3.6 billion for Queens properties last year


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Scott Bintner/PropertyShark

Queens’ relatively low land prices, access to public transportation and growing popularity has helped the borough attract a significantly larger amount of money from real estate investors in 2014 than in previous years, according to a new report.

Firms and individuals shelled out about $3.65 billion last year to buy Queens investment properties—large-scale real estate costing at least $850,000—which is a 25 percent increase from 2013, according to a report by Ariel Property Advisors.

The study pointed out that about one-third of the investment properties in Queens last year were development sites, which alone accounted for more than $1 billion, or a 191 percent gain when compared to 2012.

“Queens still presents developers with the opportunity to produce large-scale developments, and they are willing to pay a premium for prime sites,” said Daniel Wechsler, vice president of Ariel Property Advisors.

Photo courtesy of Ariel Property Advisors

Photo courtesy of Ariel Property Advisors

Wechsler pointed out that land parcels with at least 50,000 square feet of buildable rights were purchased all over “The World’s Borough,” including Astoria, Long Island City, Elmhurst, Woodside, Glendale, Jamaica, Ridgewood and Flushing, “further indicating the bullish attitude of investors on the entire borough. “

The report found that 925 properties were traded during the year, which is also a 25 percent year-over-year increase.

Some of the year’s highest profile transactions include the $110 million sale of the Standard Motors Building in Long Island City, which traded for just $70 million in 2008, and the sale of a 53-building portfolio in Kew Gardens Hills for $216 million.

There was also the $26.5 million sale of a garage near Queens Place mall in Elmhurst, which has about 227,352 buildable square feet.

Click here to read the full report.

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Astoria mom teaches baby sign language to begin communication between child and parents


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Rebecca Raymond

Parents in Astoria will now be able to figure out what their babies want before they even learn how to speak.

Rebecca Raymond is the instructor behind My Smart Hands NYC, the New York City franchise of a company started by Laura Berg in Canada, which aims to teach children and parents American Sign Language to promote communication early in life.

Raymond, an Astoria resident, first heard about baby signing when her sister-in-law began signing with her nephew. With her interest in languages, majoring in Spanish and English in college, she then decided to begin teaching her then-5-month-old daughter how to sign.

Rebecca Raymond

Rebecca Raymond

“I just love languages and I thought it would be fun to teach her,” Raymond said. “Every single day seeing her sign there were new things I was learning about her.”

Her daughter took around two months to pick up the signs and realize that it was a way to communicate with her mother. Raymond taught her how to sign words such as “milk” and “light” and noticed her daughter was learning through her modeling. 

“Every time I would say a particular word I would sign it to her,” Raymond said. “It’s easier to pick up the word rather than the strain of sound.”

She later also taught her second daughter how to sign. Raymond said that teaching children how to sign at such a young age reduces the level of frustration that comes from not being able to communicate with their parents or caregivers. She added that learning ASL increases the children’s self-esteem and self-confidence because their needs are met more quickly.

“Once your baby starts to figure out what they are doing with their hands is actually helping you communicate, then they pick it up fast,” Raymond said.

One important thing that parents have to keep in mind is being consistent in teaching their children, according to Raymond. Babies usually are not able to sign until they are 6 months old and begin picking up many signs between 7 to 12 months of age.

Rebecca Raymond's daughter signing the word "bed."

Rebecca Raymond’s daughter signing the word “bed,” one of the signs she still remembers from when she was a baby.

Raymond teaches parents out of their homes in either Astoria or Long Island City, and also at local bookstores and shops. Starting in March, she will begin giving Saturday classes at Raising Astoria, located at, 26-11 23rd Ave., as part of an eight-week course. Parents who are interested in taking part in the course can register on www.mysmarthandsnyc.com. Registration comes with a book and CD.

For more information visit www.mysmarthandsnyc.com or email rebecca@mysmarthands.com.

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Couple creates ‘nerdy’ treats at LIC’s Entrepreneur Space


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of 8 Bit Bakeshop

One East Elmhurst couple is using their love for all things “geeky” and “nerdy” to create delicious treats for every occasion.

Hannah Maldonado and Matthew McNamee met in 2012 and felt an instant connection with their interest in comic books and video games. One day they decided to drive around looking for “something nerdy to snack on” and couldn’t find anything they could get enthusiastic about.

“I’ve never had a tolerance for normal. I’ve always been the black sheep of my family,” Maldonado said. “When Matthew and I met, our friendship was based on all the nerdy things we liked.”

Photo by Darryl Brooks

Photo by Darryl Brooks

Not finding what they were looking for sparked the idea to start a business in which Maldonado, who studied pastry arts and was not content in working at other bakeries, would create her own treats. McNamee, an aircraft mechanic for Jet Blue Airways, would be in charge of any construction.

The idea then transformed into the 8 Bit Bakeshop, which at first started out of their house. The name refers to the beginning of video games and the products sold are inspired by video games and comic books, such as Super Mario, Pokémon, Deadpool, and others.

In 2013 they started to test their product at New York Comic Con to see if people would be interested. To their surprise they were met with thousands of people congratulating their work.

“Oddly enough the fan base is there and it is a lot bigger than we thought it would be,” Maldonado said. “It just makes me feel so good because it’s a niche that is so untapped. It’s great with the old crowds and it’s great to see young people into it, too.”

Now, working out of the business incubator Entrepreneur Space in Long Island City, the 8 Bit Bakeshop is known for its sugar cookies, individually decorated by Maldonado and a team of volunteers, cupcakes and a line of fudge and cakes in various flavors. They also create alcohol-infused pastries and huge sugar cookies, which are covered in icing to resemble comic book covers or pages.

They also feature a line of treats called “Little Luna,” named after the couple’s Type 1 diabetic daughter, which includes diabetic-friendly, vegan and vegetarian versions of their products. They are in the process of trying to create kosher and gluten-free items as well.

“We just want to add more love, and who doesn’t love food? And we want to make sure we don’t exclude anyone,” Maldonado added.

Along with being creative in the kitchen, one thing that makes the team of the 8 Bit Bakeshop stand out is that when they hit conventions, like New York Comic Con, they show up as personalities from video games and comic books as a form of cosplay.

Photo by Darryl Brooks

Photo by Darryl Brooks

“We want to sell the experience, not just the product,” Maldonado said. “We like to take away the counter. So when you see us selling stuff, you almost never see us behind the table.”

Maldonado said that there are plans in the future to open a store, but they first want to spread the word of the 8 Bit Bakeshop by traveling around the country and setting up booths at conventions.

They are also in the process of creating a “nerdy food box” subscription service called Byte, in which people from across the country would subscribe and be sent a box full of treats from the 8 Bit Bakeshop. They plan to beta test the product this summer.

“The best part is that Matthew and I love this,” Maldonado said. “We’re not solely in this for the money, it’s something that we enjoy. We take this as an art form, more than an actual bakery.”

For more information visit www.8bitbakeshop.com or www.facebook.com/8bitbakeshop. To place an order email 8bitbakeshop@gmail.com.

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Man wanted for public lewdness on Queens R train


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

A man fondled himself in front of a 47-year-old woman while aboard a Queens R train last week, police said.

The victim was on the train, which was near the Queens Plaza station in Long Island City, at about 5:40 p.m. on Jan. 23 when the incident occurred.

A man sitting on the train put his hands in his pants and started to fondle himself, cops said. He then got off the subway at the next stop.

Police describe the suspect as Hispanic, 5 feet 5 inches tall and 125 pounds.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

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Construction set to start on Hunters Point Community Library


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Renderings courtesy of the Queens Library

The Long Island City community celebrated Thursday morning the beginning of construction of a new waterfront library set to have the best view in Queens.

Local elected officials, community leaders, students from P.S./I.S. 78 and residents of the western Queens neighborhood came together for the start of the construction phase for the Hunters Point Community Library, which will be located at Center Boulevard and 48th Avenue, right next to Gantry Plaza State Park.

“This is an amazing historic day for Hunters Point, Long Island City,” said Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer, who helped secure $30 million to begin construction of the new branch. “For so many folks here who may have thought, ‘Is it really ever going to happen?’ today we are here to say it is, it’s happening, it’s real, this is a huge victory.”

The state-of-the-art library, set to break ground in the spring and be completed in 2017, was designed by architect Steven Holl.

THE COURIER/Photo by Angy Altamirano

THE COURIER/Photo by Angy Altamirano

“The great struggle of a neighborhood like this which has buildings going up by the day and thousands of people moving in, is making sure the infrastructure keeps up,” said state Senator Michael Gianaris, who provided $500,000 in state funding for the library. “To be able to say…we are going to have this landmark that people will look at from Manhattan and be jealous of is a testament to all the hard work that everyone has been doing.”

The 21,500-square-foot facility will feature a reading garden, rooftop terrace, reading rooms for all ages, a gallery, a performance space and a children’s area. It will overlook the Manhattan skyline across the East River.

“It will absolutely be the best view of any library in Queens. We are excited to see that start to rise and to know that we are providing a new library for this community that so desperately wants and needs it,” said Bridget Quinn-Carey, interim president and CEO of the Queens Library. “The library is in a great place for 2015 and beyond and projects like this really show how we can come together with our communities to provide what you need in a library.”

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Anthony Mazzarella, owner of The Waterfront Crabhouse in LIC, dies


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com


The owner of Long Island City’s Waterfront Crabhouse, Anthony Mazzarella, a boxing enthusiast and an avid fundraiser for people with cancer, died on Jan. 24. He was 77.

Mazzarella opened the eatery, located at 2-03 Borden Ave., almost 40 years ago. It is known for its seafood dishes and walls decorated with boxing memorabilia.

The LIC restaurant, housed in a building dating back to the 1800s, has made it through two disasters, each causing it to be closed for months. The first was a fire in 2009 and just two years ago the eatery was flooded by several feet of water after Hurricane Sandy hit the city.

Mazzarella was also a member of the New York State Boxing Commission and the NY State Wine and Grape Foundation. He served as a member of the American Cancer Society and Queens Division, and he founded the Patty Fund for Childhood Cancer.

He started an annual block party on the Fourth of July that raised thousands of dollars for cancer patients. Other events were held at the Crab House, all for the benefit of the American Cancer Society. Every year he would also host a Christmas party for kids with cancer.

“He was a terrific man who really cared about his community and his neighborhood,” said Joseph Conley, former chairman of Community Board 2. “His contributions were special, as he was instrumental in [Patty Fund for Childhood Cancer], just to name a few. He will be greatly missed.”

Mazzarella was honored with the American Cancer Society’s St. George Medal, the highest and most prestigious award for outstanding service and leadership in the fight against cancer.

Also, as a former boxer, Mazzarella started the Golden Mittens to use physical fitness as a way to keep children away from drugs.

He is survived by his wife, Deanne, three children, two grandchildren and his siblings.

Services will be held on Jan. 29 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 9 p.m. at the Pizzi Funeral House, located at 120 Paris Ave. in Northvale, N.J. A mass is scheduled for Jan. 30 at 11 a.m. at Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church at 120 Kings Highway in Tappan, in Rockland County.

In lieu of flowers, the family asks donations be made to the United Hospice of Rockland at 11 Stokum Lane, New City, NY 10956.

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18-story mixed-use residential tower planned for Long Island City


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Map courtesy of Google

Developer New York Lions Group is roaring again in Long Island City.

The Great Neck-based firm filed applications on Friday with the Department of Buildings to construct another tall, mixed-use residential building in the neighborhood.

The new tower will have 18 stories with 110 apartments as well as another 8,645 square feet for commercial tenants at 42-06 27th St., according to city records. There will also be 55 parking spaces in the development for future tenants.

It will be another collaboration between Lions Group and Flushing-based Raymond Chan Architect.

Also in Long Island City at 27-01 Jackson Ave., Lions Group plans to construct a 15-story mixed-use residential and commercial tower also designed by Raymond Chan. This project will have 88 apartments and about 7,000 square feet of commercial space.

Raymond Chan is also designing Lions Group’s 77-unit Astoria condo at 14-07 Broadway called The Baron, which is expected to be completed by September of 2016.

Finally, the Great Neck developer recently refiled plans to construct an eight-story condo with 15 apartments at 42-83 Hunter St. in Long Island City. The building will have 12,336 square feet of living space and is being designed by Flushing-based MY Architect PC.

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Tech-based laundry, dry cleaning company to expand services into Queens


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Images courtesy of WashClub NYC

Having your laundry washed is about to get as easy as tapping on a smartphone for residents in Long Island City, Ridgewood and Maspeth.

WashClub NYC, a tech-based laundry and dry cleaning company offering on-demand pickup and delivery, has announced it plans to make its way to Queens within the first few months of 2015.

The Brooklyn-based company, which launched in 2010 and has since been operating in Manhattan and Brooklyn, also debuted a new app for Apple and Android users. Customers will be able to schedule, track and personalize the care of their laundry and dry cleaning through an “easy three-tap method.”

“We’re creating a path that is disrupting the way the laundry and dry cleaning industry operates,” said Rick Rome, president of WashClub NYC. “By releasing our app and entering select neighborhoods of Queens, we are going to reach more New York customers than ever before.”

The way WashClub NYC works is customers, either on the web or via the app, create an account and schedule a free pickup. They will then have to get the laundry ready to be picked up on the scheduled date and time.

Within 24 to 48 hours, customers will receive an email or text message notification about 30 minutes or less before the driver arrives. Delivery is free and people can choose what time works best for them. On the app, customers can also track via Google maps where the driver is and how close they are.

Services offered by WashClub NYC, which does all the cleaning in-house, include wash and fold, dry cleaning and tailoring. All first-time users receive 20 percent off and a free laundry bag.

“Our overall company goal is to be able to service all of New York City eventually,” Rome said. “It’s the most convenient and easiest way to do your laundry.”

Rome added that the reason services will start being offered in Long Island City, Ridgewood and Maspeth is because of their proximity to the Brooklyn facility.

However, he said in the future he plans to open a facility in Queens to be able to serve the entire borough.

“Queens is a very important and exciting next step for us. We think Queens is going to be an absolute fantastic market place,” Rome said. “Queens is a stepping stone to the next area.”

For more information or to set up an account, visit www.WashClubNYC.com or call 888-920-1370.

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Police officers honored for saving man’s life in LIC


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer's office

Two local police officers were honored Thursday for their heroic actions that saved a life in Long Island City last month.

Police Officers William Caldarera and Corey Sarro of the 108th Precinct were given a proclamation on behalf of the City Council for saving the life of a 66-year-old man who was found motionless in front of LaGuardia Community College in December.

Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer, who was joined by Mayor Bill de Blasio, presented the honor to Caldarera and Sarro.

On Dec. 16, the officers saw a crowd of people gathering around a man lying motionless on the sidewalk in front of the college. Caldarera approached the elderly man and discovered he did not have a heartbeat and was not breathing.

Sarro then began to conduct chest compressions, while an ambulance was requested. Using a defibrillator provided by a public safety officer, Caldarera and Sarro attached the machine to the man’s chest, according to police. After a second shock, the man’s heartbeat returned and he began breathing again.

The man was taken to Elmhurst Hospital in stable condition.

Although both Caldarera and Sarro had experience with CPR while off duty, this incident was their first time having to use a defibrillator.

Both officers said it felt great once they were able to revive the man and get him to breathe again.

“There is really no feeling to describe it,” Sarro said at the time. “It was a relief to be able to save him.”

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Multi-lot Court Square development site hits the market for $41.5M


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Modern Spaces

A seven-lot portfolio near the heart of the hot Court Square area in Long Island City is asking for $41.5 million, and will probably get that much or more soon.

A collection of six landlords are selling the two- and three-story townhouse buildings on the parcels, which are being marketing by Modern Spaces and The Corcoran Group.

The landlords combined the properties to maximize buildable rights. Together the site has about 11,145 square feet, and offers 167,000 buildable square feet, The Real Deal reported.

The portfolio of properties has only been on the market for three days and there have been offers around the asking price, said Evan Daniel, vice president at Modern Spaces. Three of the buildings are located on 45th Avenue at 23-10, 23-14, and 23-16. The remaining properties are at 45-03, 45-05, 45-07 and 45-09 23rd St.

The size and zoning of the site allows for many possible uses, and Daniel believes it could be great for a mixed-use structure.

“I think retail hasn’t really come yet to this area, but we all know it will come here. I think it would be good for this project,” Daniel said. “You can have a tremendous mixed-use project here with residential, office and retail.”

Because it is located across from One Court Square, also known as the Citibank Building, and near the mix of Court Square subway transit options, the location will be attractive to developers.

“One thing we know about this project is that location is second to none,” Daniel said.

23rd Street Properties

23rd Street properties

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Developing Queens: Hunter’s Point South is an example of what the city needs


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos courtesy of Related Companies

Frank J. Monterisi, Jr. is a senior vice president at Related Companies, where he is responsible for overseeing residential developments in New York and Chicago. Since joining Related in 2007, Monterisi has overseen the construction of 4 million square feet of residential housing valued at more than $2 billion. A native of Whitestone, Monterisi returned to his hometown to manage the Hunter’s Point South Living development in Long Island City, which will bring 925 permanently affordable apartments to the area. However, there were nearly 93,000 applicants for those units. 

La Guerre: So you’re a Queens native? Tell me about growing up here.

Monterisi: I grew up in Queens. I went to Holy Cross High School. There are two things that I wanted to be in my life. One was a marine and the other was a real estate developer. I went to the Naval Academy with the intentions of being a marine officer. I got nominated for the academy by Congressman Tom Manton and his office was in Long Island City. I remember going to my interview for the nomination on Queens Boulevard. Just think, 20 years later I would be building buildings in his district.

La Guerre: What’s changed in Long Island City that you like or don’t like?

Monterisi: Changes that I like are there are many new restaurants that popped up, new places, more people moved in and there is more density so things are getting built up and that is a good thing from a real estate developer’s perspective.

La Guerre: With the influx of this developing boom, the industrial sector of Long Island City is being threatened. Where do you stand on this issue?

Monterisi: New York needs more housing. At the same time there is a look and feel that as authentic, native New Yorkers, you want to see preserved. The two things can co-exist.

La Guerre: But what about the possibility of another residential–focused rezoning for the neighborhood?

Monterisi: That is a good thing, because we need to find neighborhoods for growth. We need to find places to build affordable housing like Hunter’s Point South, which will stay affordable so that New Yorkers can stay in New York and we don’t see the flight of people getting priced out

La Guerre: What does it say about this city when you get 93,000 applications for 925 units in the Hunter’s Point South buildings?

Monterisi: All those people, the average everyday New Yorker, what’s at the top of their list? To find a nice place to live without horrible rent stories.

La Guerre: What is the next step in the process for future tenants?

Monterisi: We just got the list from the city last week, and now there is an administrative process and after that happens we will start calling people and inviting them to meet our team and talk about the buildings. We are hopeful that by spring time we’ll have places for people to move into.

La Guerre: What will people be most amazed at when seeing this project when they step into it for the first time?

Monterisi: The views are off the charts — it’s some of the best views in New York City. When people get into the building they are going to say to themselves “I know people that live across the river and pay three times the rent that I am paying for the same apartment.”

Frank Monterisi

Frank Monterisi

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LIC boutique hostel to host first Queens Brewers Night


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Image courtesy of The Local NY

It is time to raise your glass to Queens.

In celebration of the booming borough being recently named the No. 1 travel destination in the United States by travel guidebook company Lonely Planet, Long Island City boutique hostel The Local NY will be hosting the first Queens Brewers Night.

In December, Queens made the top of the list of the company’s Best in the U.S. 2015, selected by Lonely Planet’s authors and ranked by its U.S. editors.

Each of the craft breweries recognized by Lonely Planet — Big Alice, Rockaway, Singlecut and Transmitter — will be serving their latest drinks on Feb. 7 alongside live music.

The Local NY, located at 13-02 44th Ave., was also featured by Lonely Planet.

Local bands Fairways, Hips & Brows and Fuxida will perform, and Queens food vendors will be selling food.

Queens Brewers Night goes from 7 to 10 p.m. and tickets are $20.15. To purchase tickets, click here.

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City considering rezoning Long Island City for even more housing


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

The residential construction boom in Long Island City may continue for much longer as the city mulls over a potential rezoning to allow more high-rise apartment buildings in the neighborhood.

City Hall is considering up-zoning an area covering about 100 blocks, which includes the Queens Plaza and Court Square sections, to promote more residential buildings, including many with mixed-income units, to combat the affordable housing crisis in the city, according to a published report.

The plan has support from some in the community, but also draws concern about upgrading public amenities for current residents, such as transportation and schools, before bringing in more people. Even without the up-zoning, thousands of new residents will be coming to Long Island City in the near future.

There are already about 20,000 units under construction in the neighborhood, business advocacy group Long Island City Partnership told the Wall Street Journal.

Other community leaders feel it could further diminish the shrinking manufacturing sector in the burgeoning neighborhood and put pressure on the balance the community is trying to maintain.

The LIC Partnership will conduct its own planning study, focusing on how to balance business, residential, tech and industrial growth in the area in years to come.

The New York City Regional Development Economic Council awarded a $100,000 grant for the study and subsequent plan that will be created from it.

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Ridgewood rents skyrocketing since end of recession


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Charts and photos courtesy of StreetEasy.com

“Quooklyn,” “Ridgewick,” “Ridgebetween,” whatever you want to call it, rents in Ridgewood have exploded in the city’s newest hot neighborhood since the end of the recession.

Rents in Ridgewood last year increased about 63 percent since 2009, according to data compiled by real estate website StreetEasy.com at the request of The Courier, as more luxury rental buildings moved down the L and M train lines from Bushwick and Williamsburg.

The data finds the median price of rents in Ridgewood last year increased to $2,182 from $1,340 in 2009, good for first place in rents charged in Queens. Even when comparing year-to-date numbers between last year and 2013, Ridgewood experienced median rent increases of more than $382, while Astoria saw only a $50 increase and Long Island City actually had a decline.

“While rents remained flat in Queens between 2013 and 2014, some neighborhoods experienced a surge in prices,” said Alan Lightfeldt, a StreetEasy data scientist. “Ridgewood — also known as ‘Ridgebetween’ because of its new found status as an ‘in-between’ neighborhood of Brooklyn and Queens — saw prices increase by just over 21 percent as demand for the neighborhood has surged in recent years.”

This “new-found status” has helped businesses and created a buzz about Ridgewood that excites some longtime locals, and makes former residents want to come back, but renters are paying for it.

 

09-14 Rents

Another interesting find from the data suggests rising prices will continue in the Rockaways, which had previously recorded a drop due to effects from Superstorm Sandy.

“As this neighborhood continues its recovery from the destruction of Superstorm Sandy, rents have increased rapidly but still remain lower than they were five years ago — a sign that the rental market in Rockaways still has room for further recovery in the months and years ahead,“ Lightfeldt said.

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