Tag Archives: Long Island City

Woodside man beautifies neighborhood one fire alarm box at a time


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Angy Altamirano

Call him the anti-graffiti artist.

Woodside resident John S. Colgan has turned outdoor walls, fire boxes, lampposts and hydrants into his canvas — not in an illegal effort at self-expression but to battle the defacing of his beloved neighborhood by graffiti.

Colgan got tired of waiting around for someone to clean up his community from the work of graffiti vandals, so instead he picked up a paintbrush and took matters into his own hands.

For the past three and a half years, Colgan, who goes by “Fire Alarm Guy” on Twitter, has been going around the western Queens neighborhood he calls home and fighting the problem of graffiti, along with bringing fire alarm boxes back to life.

“I wanted to do something nice for the neighborhood,” he said. “When I was a kid in the ’80s everything was pristine. People took care of things themselves back then. If you want to get rid of graffiti in the neighborhood, you have to do it yourself.”

After deciding to give back to community after attending church one morning, the 39-year-old security guard began to repaint lampposts, fire hydrants and fire alarm boxes in Woodside.

He has also taken the time to paint murals underneath bridges in the neighborhood, including a large American Flag, paid for by American Legion Post #1836, located on 32nd Avenue between 56th and 58th street. He plans to update the mural and add more detail to it during the summer. 

“That’s how it all started: I decided to give back, and now I’m addicted to it,” he said. 

Colgan said before he worked in the shadows, because he thought he would get into trouble for painting, but now he goes around talking to people about the issues, in hopes of getting more people involved. 

Taking things further, for the past two years, Colgan has teamed up with the Woodside Neighborhood Association and also begun going around covering up graffiti during a nightly patrol, which at first was just out of habit. Every night he drives around the neighborhood and finds fresh graffiti tags on walls and covers them up with paint he keeps at the ready in his car. He uses whatever color he has on hand. 

Members of the Woodside Neighborhood Association then come back to the site and paint over with a “battleship gray” color so that the new paint looks uniform with the rest. 

Photo courtesy of John S. Colgan

Photo courtesy of John S. Colgan

“The point is if you cover [the graffiti] within 24 hours, the taggers talk to each other and tell each other not to tag there,” he said. “The bottom line is people have to do it themselves. If they don’t fix it then they just get used to seeing it.”

Mostly all the paint used for the projects is purchased from a local shop called Gleason Paint, located at 65-01 Roosevelt Ave. Colgan said that at times the store donates paints and helps with any questions he might have. 

In the past couple of weeks, Colgan said he had noticed less graffiti in his neighborhood and has been able to move his cleanup project to Long Island City and parts of Jackson Heights. He also helps paint hydrants, lampposts and fire alarm boxes found in the perimeter of local police precincts such as the 114th and 108th precincts. 

As the weather gets warmer, Colgan plans to move further into the borough and help cover up graffiti in other areas such as Astoria and Corona. 

“The original goal was just to make it look nice and when I was painting people were stopping,” Colgan said. “The neighborhood is behind me now. They’re taking pride in the neighborhood.”

To see Colgan’s works and get updated information follow @firealarmguy75 on Twitter or @thewoodsideavenger on Instagram.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Rego Park studio rents soaring: report


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

ContourLR1

Fueled by hot luxury listings, studio apartment rents in Rego Park are going through the roof after another huge monthly increase in December.

Rego Park renters were likely to pay $184, or about 12 percent, more on average for a studio apartment in December than November, according to MNS Real Estate’s monthly Queens Rental Market Report, which was released Thursday.

The change in rates was quite drastic over a relatively short period of time. Studio renters in Rego Park were likely to pay an average of just $1,325 per month in August, instead of the current $1,717, according to MNS.

The real estate firm highlighted the neighborhood in the report and called its monthly increase “surprising.” That’s probably how future renters will feel when they realize the popular neighborhood of Astoria currently has an average asking rent of about $127 less per studio.

But the top rates in Rego Park were caused by the change in inventory, according to the report.

“Rego Park saw a decrease in studio inventory with various lower price rentals coming off the market, leaving a small number of higher priced units, namely at The Contour on 97-45 Queens Boulevard,” the report said.

In Jackson Heights there was a similar trend in two-bedroom rates over the month, which rose $230 to an average price of $2,317 per month. Jackson Heights, which has an inventory problem, has the lowest availability of two-bedroom apartments in the borough with just six, the report said. The neighborhood also has the highest demand for two-bedroom apartments as units have an average of 19 days on the market.

Long Island City led the pack again with the highest rental prices for studios and one- and two-bedroom apartments in December, according to the report.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Longtime LIC auto shop moves to make room for 27-story rental building


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Scott Bintner/PropertyShark

A Long Island City auto repair shop that has been a fixture in the community for more than four decades has moved to make room for a tall residential building as the jostling for space continues in the burgeoning neighborhood.

The awning for LIC Auto Repair at 27-19 44th Dr. has been taken down, and there is now a sign on the door indicating the shop has moved to 83-12 Cooper Ave. in Glendale, according to The Court Square Blog.

The property’s new owner, Manhattan-based Twining Properties, filed permits to construct a new 27-story building with 165 units on the site late last year.

There will be 122,405 square feet of residential space in the building, according to the filing with the Buildings Department.

There will also be 2,124 square feet of commercial space in the new property, which is being designed by Handel Architects.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Community welcomes new officers coming into Patrol Borough Queens North


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Angy Altamirano

A group of 56 new members of New York’s Finest, who will be patrolling the streets of Queens, received a warm welcome Monday afternoon by the communities they will work to keep safe.

The incoming officers, who were part of the graduating NYPD class on Dec. 29 and were assigned to Patrol Borough Queens North, were greeted on Jan. 5 by local leaders and NYPD officials during a ceremony at the Langston Hughes Community Library in Corona.

Patrol Borough Queens North is made up of eight precincts ranging from locations in Bayside to Ridgewood. The officers who filled the library’s second floor on Monday have been assigned to the 104th, 108th, 109th, 110th, 111th, 112th, 114th and 115th precincts. 

Assistant Chief Diana Pizzuti, commanding officer of Patrol Borough Queens North, welcomed the new cops to their posts and called them “ambassadors” for the borough, which was named the top tourist destination for 2015. 

“You are our youth, and it means a lot to me to make sure you get the best training,” Pizzuti told  the officers. “Queens is a very supportive community.”

Pizzuti also went over what she called the “Five Cs in Policing”: Community, Communication, Crime Prevention, Counter terrorism, and Character.

Pizzuti also spoke of the two slain officers Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu, and reminded the new cops to stay safe while patrolling the streets.

“You have to stay vigilant. You wear the blue, you’re the target,” Pizzuti said. “Be mindful of your surroundings, not just at work but at home. Not everyone is our friend.”

Among the community leaders that spoke was Victoria Schneps, publisher of The Queens Courier, who congratulated and welcomed the new faces to the NYPD.

“You are the future sitting here, and I want you to know how much we respect you,” Schneps said. “We love our neighborhoods and we love the police that protect our neighborhoods.”

Seven of the eight precincts will receive six new officers. The 114th Precinct, which patrols Astoria, Long Island City, Woodside and Jackson Heights, will get 12 cops because they have more reported crimes, according to the NYPD.

“Keep an open mind and keep a positive attitude while you’re out there,” Pizzuti said. “Good luck and we’re here to help. We are one family.”

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Permits filed for building at new Cornell Tech campus


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Renderings courtesy of Weiss/Manfredi

For now Cornell University’s Tech campus is located in Google’s building in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan.

But it’s widely expected that when Cornell’s new 2-million-square-foot tech campus opens on Roosevelt Island in 2017, the young leading minds of a new era will pour into Long Island City via the Queensboro Bridge for work opportunities and cheaper residences than Manhattan—as well as a world-class skyline view.

That long-awaited boon for the Queens tech community just took another step forward as Weiss/Manfredi Architecture filed an application with the Buildings Department Monday for the new corporate co-location office building on the campus.

The new 188,603-square-foot building will be six stories tall, according to the city filing, and will have a 38-car parking garage. There will be space within the building for students, faculty and firms on campus, according to Cornell.

Campus 6

The building is filed for 1 Main St. on Roosevelt Island, which is technically in Manhattan, and the land is owned by the New York City Economic Development Corporation. Forest City Ratner Companies is developing the building.

In addition to the corporate co-location building, there will be a residential building, designed by Handel Architects, which includes 350 student housings units, with a mix of one, two and three bedroom suites.

Amenities in the residential building include a roof deck, gym, bike room, lounge and various media rooms, according to Cornell. In total there will be housing for 2,000 students and 280 faculty members.

The future campus will have 2.5 acres of new green space, including an outdoor campus plaza called the “Tech Walk” with outdoor benches and trees.

Architect firm Morphosis is designing the first academic building on the campus, which will feature academic classrooms and facilities.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

LIC Partnership awarded $100K grant for comprehensive neighborhood study


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

As the housing and rental market continues to explode in Long Island City, the transformation of this former industrial-focused community to a mixed-use residential area has been a major topic in recent years.

To maintain the community’s industrial roots — which still supply many jobs for the city’s manufacturing workforce — while preparing for possible changes in other sectors, the nonprofit Long Island City Partnership is hoping to conduct a comprehensive study of the neighborhood and create a plan for the future.

The LIC Partnership study is close to realization as the advocacy group announced Monday it was awarded a $100,000 grant from the New York City Regional Economic Development Council to create a comprehensive plan of the future of the neighborhood. The group hopes to use this plan to guide LIC and maximize the benefits of its growth from all aspects, which on top of industrial and residential also includes the expansion of the commercial and tech markets as well.

“Currently experiencing a period of explosive transformation, much of it 30 years in the making, Long Island City, Queens, is now ready for its own, comprehensive look,” LIC Partnership President Elizabeth Lusskin said. “Funding for this study will allow us to work to set a vision and priorities consonant with the neighborhood’s goals.  We hope to guide city, state and federal action based upon an in-depth studied assessment of the facts and current conditions.”

The LIC Partnership applied for the grant with support from local community leaders and politicians. The state had to review about 2,600 projects that requested funding.

The study was selected among 71 projects in New York City, where a total of $61.2 million was awarded.

The plan, which was discussed at the partnership’s 27th annual trade show and luncheon in November, would for example help the community navigate through the wave of major residential developments planned for the area while learning how to improve the quality of life for current and future residents.

A wave of national retail and commercial investments is also expected to hit LIC in the future as well as a tech boom fueled by the Cornell Tech campus on Roosevelt Island, and the partnership’s study will be necessary to examine these changes as well.

“The $100,000 grant from the Regional Economic Development Council is not only a recognition of the stellar work of this organization,”Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer said, “but begins the real work of completing  a comprehensive study on how to get LIC to reach new and even greater heights.”

RECOMMENDED STORIES 

Former LIC baked goods warehouse fetches $14 million


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Kalmon Dolgin Affiliates and Scott Bintner/PropertyShark 

The site of a former baked goods warehouse is getting a fresh start.

The property, which includes two interconnected warehouses at 33-33 and 33-35 11th St. in Long Island City, was recently sold for $14 million by owners 33-11 Associates Partnership and Jacobson Realty Corp. Kalmon Dolgin Affiliates (KDA) represented the sellers in the deal.

Operative Cake, a baked goods wholesale business, used the property to warehouse its products before recently relocating to the Bronx.

JPRG Holdings, which bought the property, is hoping to find another tenant for the warehouse, but the site could be expanded for construction of a residential structure, a KDA representative said.

“The buyer, a local investor, currently plans to lease out the property as a warehouse, the same as prior to the sale,” said Grant Dolgin of KDA. “However, 33-33 and 33-55 11th St. also has the potential to be converted and developed into a rental or condominium building. It has 70,000 as-of-right buildable square feet for residential development.”

If it is eventually turned into a residential development, the site would be surrounded by local amenities that future tenants could take advantage of, such as Socrates Sculpture Park and the Noguchi Museum, and would provide easy access to transportation via the N and Q subway lines.

Operative Cake

RECOMMENDED STORIES 

Queens native makes career out of performing Hollywood stunts


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Derrick Simmons

Derrick Simmons has fallen from the sky, tumbled from a bridge and almost been run over by a car — and he’s done all of it on purpose.

The Queens native has spent the last two decades as a stuntman, standing in for many of the industry’s top actors.

He’s also acted through the years, getting his start in a national commercial while he was still a child.

Now, after writing, producing and acting in three of his own films, he’s hoping to move from taking the fall for Hollywood’s elite to becoming one of the rising stars himself.

“I love the action,“ Simmons said. “It doesn’t feel like a job because I love what I do.”

Simmons spent the first seven years of his life at the Queensbridge Houses in Long Island City. He then moved to Woodside, where he remained for the next 14 years, until relocating to the Upper East Side, where he still lives today.

His love for acting began at 10 years old. At that age, he started taking acting classes, and during his first showcase, a talent scout saw him and sent him on his first audition. From that audition, he was cast in a national Burger King commercial, opposite Stacey Dash, who would go on to star in the movie “Clueless.”

“Every time [my family] would hear the commercial on the TV we would run into the room and celebrate,” he said.

The commercial earned him entry into the Screen Actors Guild, but the young Simmons thought the $635 fee was a little steep. But after he received his $1,800 paycheck for the commercial, he decided to join.

More commercials as well as TV work soon followed, and as time went on, he would be pulled aside while acting and be replaced with a stuntman. During those moments Simmons had a thought — why can’t I do the stunts?

He started training with stuntmen, and landed one of his first stunt jobs in 1994 on the TV series “New York Undercover,” where he was thrown off a bridge.

From then on, his “phone started lighting up.”

Simmons has done stunts for Chris Rock in the movie “Dogma,” where he fell out of the sky, Taye Diggs in “The Best Man,” Whoopi Goldberg in the latest “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” installment, the Precious character in the film of the same name, Tracy Morgan in “30 Rock” and the movie “Cop Out,” among others.

“We come to the set and we do the action and there is a lot of adrenaline,” Simmons said.

“It’s a great job as long as you don’t get hurt,” he added.

Simmons has only been sent to the hospital twice as a result of performing stunts.

Once he broke his collarbone during a commercial shoot. The second time, he injured his ankle while filming a scene for “NYPD Blue,” where he had to run from a car and almost get hit by the vehicle.

Though he enjoys his work as a stuntman, Simmons said acting is his “first passion.” But he’s found a new love for filmmaking in roles that put him behind the camera.

In an effort to evolve and grow within the industry, he’s written, produced and directed three movies.

In the first “Jump Offs” (2007), he played three roles, and in the second, “Women Do It Better” (2009), he takes on four parts. Both films examine the world of relationships and “players.” The first movie is from the man’s point of view, and the second from the woman’s.

His latest film, “Nobody’s Perfect,” is his first thriller. The film is about a woman who meets the man of her dreams who turns into a nightmare once they get married. The movie won best film at the Mt. Vernon Film Festival this September.

Simmons hopes to turn more of his scripts into films and get to them to a larger audience so he can become more than just the man who does stunts for the big stars.

“As soon as you hear the word Derrick you will think the word entertainment,” he said.

RECOMMENDED STORIES 

 

Learning the art of the samurai sword in LIC


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Eric Jankiewicz

Behind one of the studio doors at the Long Island City Art Center you can get a slice of Japanese culture dating back to the 1600s and come out feeling like a warrior.

Every Thursday night, the LIC Japanese art gallery RESOBOX holds samurai sword (iaido) classes at the center, based on the traditional sword techniques of the samurai, with instructor Deborah Klens-Bigman.

Although the classes first began at RESOBOX’s official gallery space located at 41-26 27th St. in 2011, a few months ago the instruction was moved to 44-02 23rd St., providing more open space for students and allowing art pieces to be kept at a safe distance from moving swords.

At the center, studio 210 becomes the dojo for Klens-Bigman and her students, who during a visit by The Queens Courier included one of RESOBOX’s founders, Takashi Ikezawa.

RESOBOX Co-Founder Takashi Ikezawa

RESOBOX co-founder Takashi Ikezawa

Klens-Bigman has studied iaido for more than 25 years and was first introduced to it by Yoshiteru Otani when she saw him perform a demonstration. Otani later became her teacher until his death in 2004 .

“I was at a point in my life where I was looking to make a change of direction. [Otani] provided it,” Klens-Bigman said about her decision to begin learning iaido.

She has been teaching the form for about 14 years and brought her classes to RESOBOX when it opened in Long Island City.

At the beginning of Klens-Bigman’s class, students enter a moment of silence and breath while kneeling. They follow by bowing to the shinzen on the wall, a piece of calligraphy by Kiyami Hiroshi meaning culture and martial arts are the same path, then they bow to the instructor and finally to their sword.

Beginners are given a wooden sword to start learning the technique. Although it isn’t the same as a real blade, it still has the design and feel of a sword (just without the potential danger of hacking off a finger).

The main goal behind iaido is to draw your sword, defeat the opponent and then return your sword to its case, according to Klens-Bigman.

The class begins with an opening exercise, designed by Otani, called happogiri, which is the cutting in eight directions. It takes foot and arm movement, and can take a few tries to get the order correct. Afterward, students work on an individual kata, or exercise, called a Shohatto.

“It’s not a sport. For one thing, any adult who is in reasonably good physical shape can take up this art form and do it for the rest of his/her life. One can’t say that about most sports. And the more you practice, the better you get at it,” Klens-Bigman said. “One of my teachers turned 90 years old this year!”

Once the class comes to an end, students come together again, kneel down and bow to their sword, instructor and then the shinzen on the wall.

“For people who are interested, learning to use a sword teaches self-discipline and concentration. It is also good low-impact aerobic exercise,” Klens-Bigman added. “Most importantly, though, as my teacher used to say, ‘Iaido (swordsmanship) is philosophy.’”

Classes are available every Thursday starting at 6:30 p.m. at  44-02 23rd St. A trial class is $15 for 30 minutes, with prior registration. One class is $25 and five classes are $100.

For more information and to sign up for a class, visit www.resobox.com/iaido.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Eight-story condo tower to replace LIC industrial site


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Scott Bintner/PropertyShark

Great Neck-based New York Lions Group has refiled plans with the Department of Buildings to construct a residential tower on the site of a former industrial building in Long Island City.

The new structure will be a skinny eight-story condo building at 42-83 Hunter St. with 15 units, according to city records, and will be designed by Flushing-based MY Architect PC.

Lions Group picked up the property for nearly $1.9 million in May, according to city filings, and the new building will be 12,336 square feet, which is about the max allowed to be built on the site.

Demolition permits were filed last month for the small, one-story industrial building currently occupying the site.

Lions Group has been working on a number of projects throughout the borough, including a seven-story glassy Astoria condominium building, which they plan to begin building next year.

RECOMMENDED STORIES 

17-story hotel to be built over LIC parking facility


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Scott Bintner/PropertyShark

With about 20 new hotels in five years, it’s easy to see that Long Island City has become a hot hotel neighborhood in the city.

Now, the burgeoning neighborhood is set to double the number of new hotels with nearly 20 more hotels planned, according to information from business advocacy organization LIC Partnership. A construction permit to begin work on one of the new hotels was filed with the Buildings Department on Christmas Eve.

Anthony Pecora, president of Forte Italia LLC, filed permits to construct a 17-story hotel with 243 rooms at 41-08 Crescent St.

The hotel will have nearly 150,000 square feet of space, and there will be a 127-space enclosed parking garage. Dan Ionescu Architects is designing the building.

Forte Italia acquired the site in 1998, according to property records. The site is currently a parking facility.

This development falls in line with the trend of transforming parking garages into major developments, much like recent plans for other projects filed throughout the city.

Last month, the owner of the parking garage at 30-17 40th Ave. in Long Island City also filed permits with the Department of Buildings to construct a new 10-story mixed-use residential and commercial tower on the site of the lot.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Man pistol-whipped during LIC robbery: cops


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of NYPD

Police are looking for three men and one woman who they say pistol-whipped a man before robbing him in Long Island City this past summer.

The 22-year-old man was exiting an apartment on 12th Street about 2:30 a.m. on June 28 when the four suspects surrounded him and demanded his property, cops said. Two of the male suspects took out guns, and one of them pistol-whipped the victim. The suspects then stole the man’s jewelry, including a black and gold G-Shock watch, an Apple iPhone and credit cards.

The victim suffered fractured a bone in his face during the attack and was treated at an area hospital, police said.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Innovative wine bar opens on Long Island City waterfront


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Rob Bralow

Wining and dining on the Long Island City waterfront is now easier with the opening of an innovative bar that serves wine on tap.

BLVD Wine Bar, which boasts 40 different types of wines from around the world, opened in a 1,500-square-foot ground-floor space on Dec. 20 at TF Cornerstone’s 47-20 Center Boulevard building.

The bar offers wine on tap and also sells craft beers among other beverages. Artisanal cheeses and charcuterie are served as well. The establishment features a bar in the front and also has a room for private parties and events in the back.

“This new concept is a great addition to the LIC waterfront and its diverse array of retail that has a wide appeal to locals and visitors alike,” said Steve Gonzalez, director of retail leasing for TF Cornerstone.


RECOMMENDED STORIES

Dining: Sugar plum fairies


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photos by Bradley Hawks

BY BRADLEY HAWKS

Pink spirals of coco fraise reach toward the ceiling, golden domes of mango and kiwi glisten in the pastry case, napoleons conceal sweet creams beneath zigzags of chocolate and vanilla frosting in flaky thin layers of pastry, slivers of apples rest cheek to cheek beneath blankets of sugary glaze, and pies of pecans, pumpkin and chocolate mousse beg to be chosen to take home.

Cannelle Patisserie has been a beacon of Parisian baking in East Elmhurst for over seven years, and just a few weeks ago, they opened their second location just a block from the Long Island City waterfront. It should come as no great surprise that recently the proprietor moved into one of the buildings across the street from the new location.

Owner and baker Jean-Claude Perennou was eager to offer a tour of the newest facility. And although most of the pastries are baked in specialty ovens in East Elmhurst, the LIC location will feature many exclusive items only available there.

“Most of the breads here are a little more labor-intensive,” Perennou explains. “And we will feature four versions of our Christmas logs.”

Patrons can order from a wide expanse of glass showcases, then take trays to communal tables to nosh on their sweet selections. As a part the requisite sampling, I savored one of the canelés.

A fresh canelé pastry

A fresh canelé pastry

These mysteriously magnificent little domes originated in Bordeaux, though they are commonly found throughout all of Paris. The source of endless myths and legends, some say they were developed by a tiny convent of nuns in Bordeaux, while others attribute the origins to the winemakers of the region who utilized only the egg whites, leaving behind the yolks for the pastries. Regardless of speculation, it is particularly thrilling they can now be purchased on 47th Avenue. The crisp, crunchy, caramel casing gives way to an airy, rum-kissed pastry laced with custard. These tiny two-bite treats are simply exquisite, like miniature bruléed Eiffel Towers.
Patrons can also select various quiche and croque monsieurs from the fridge — as well as a modest selection of sandwiches and salads. They are offering soups as well — most recently French onion. Everything is worth a try, so come prepared for a line, especially on the weekends.

But do not be surprised if you find — as I did — that it is perfectly acceptable to make a holiday stop simply for an exquisite pastry. And do not be ashamed if you find yourself returning a salad to the refrigerator and ordering a mango mousse instead. This is far more than your average neighborhood bakery. So grab an extra canelé — or two or three — especially if there is a chance you might run into someone you know. Because despite even the most generous holiday spirit, you are probably not going to want to share.

Cannelle Patisserie
5-11 47th Ave., Long Island City
718-937-8500

 RECOMMENDED STORIES

First QNS Real Estate Conference set for February


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Real Estate Conference logo edit

The growing Queens real estate market will soon have a forum where industry leaders can gather to network and discuss opportunities across the borough.

The premier QNS Real Estate Conference will be held on Feb. 26, 2015, and will feature top real estate firms that are investing in the borough, while welcoming prospective developers, owners, architects and other industry members.

Star Network and The Queens Courier, in association with the Real Estate Board of New York (REBNY), are hosting the event, which will include a keynote address by Pat Foye, executive director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Real estate website PropertyShark and Flushing Bank are sponsoring the conference.

“This event is a great opportunity for the public to learn about the latest trends and investment information in Queens from the top people in our industry,” said Jamie McShane, REBNY senior vice president for communications. “Queens is becoming increasingly important as we have seen projects from Astoria Cove to Hallets Point, and projects at Queens Plaza South and the Long Island City waterfront, as well as Willets Point. And the members of the REBNY are very involved with a growing number of exciting projects in Queens, our largest borough and the most ethnically diverse county in America.”

The event will be at Terrace on the Park at 52-11 111th St. in Flushing at 8 a.m., beginning with breakfast and ending with three panel discussions.

The panel discussions will focus on why big investment firms are coming to Queens, the experiences of major developers already based in the borough and experts’ perspectives on the market in Ridgewood.

“The Queens market has huge opportunity, and this event will shed light on the power of it,” said Josh Schneps, co-publisher of The Courier. “This event is a perfect platform to do so for the industry. We hope people interested in the Queens market will attend and hopefully make investments in the borough.”

Click here to register for the event.

RECOMMENDED STORIES