Tag Archives: Long Island City

LIC Flea & Food beer garden offers drinks from six Queens breweries


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

File photo

As the weather is expected to hit the 70s this weekend, what better way to cool down than with a cold drink from the LIC Flea Beer Garden?

The popular Long Island City flea market celebrated its opening weekend last week, filled with sunshine and visitors from near and far.

LIC Flea & Food is located at an outdoor lot by the waterfront at the corner of Fifth Street and 46th Avenue, and offers items for sale including food and drinks, collectibles, antiques, arts and crafts, handcrafted jewelry and fashion, and much more.

Along with over 80 vendors each day, the market also has a beer garden, exclusively serving beers brewed in Queens from local breweries including Rockaway Brewery, Queens Brewery, Finback Brewery and SingleCut Beersmiths. The LIC Flea is the only location to carry beer from all six breweries. The bar will also offer a great selection of wines.

LIC Flea & Food will run every Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., through the end of October.

For updates on the LIC Flea & Food market, follow on Facebook.com/LICFlea, Instagram.com/LICFlea and @LICFlea on Twitter.

Applications from potential vendors for the new season are still being accepted by registering online at www.licflea.com.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Queens rental inventory and prices steadily rising: report


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of MNS Real Estate

While it’s nowhere near the levels of Manhattan or Brooklyn, the amount of available rental apartments in Queens is steadily rising, and prices are trending upwards as well.

From February to March the rental inventory rose 6.59 percent to 889 apartments available throughout the borough, according to the MNS Real Estate’s March Queens Rental Market Report.

This marks the second consecutive monthly increase. Additionally, since MNS has been tracking the Queens rental market in August 2014, the borough’s inventory climbed from just 592 apartments.

The borough’s real estate boom is driven by popular neighborhoods, such as Long Island City and Astoria, and MNS CEO Andrew Barrocas said the inventory will continue to increase because demand is high in Queens and developers are bringing more projects here.

When inventory rises, normally prices fall, but that may not be the case long term in the Queens rental market because of the high demand, Barrocas said.

“Traditionally it does [fall],” Barrocas said, “but I think certain markets flourish when more inventory comes.”

Barrocas pointed to Long Island City, where the demand to move into the area has caused increased creation of new amenities, such as dinning and retail options, further pushing up values in the neighborhood.

The most expensive rents in the borough are, of course, in Long Island City. March rents in LIC averaged $2,385, $2,932 and $4,091 per month for studios, one-bedrooms and two-bedrooms respectively, according to the report.

But only studios in the neighborhood saw a monthly increase in March.

RECOMMENDED STORIES 

New LIC condo building to begin sales in May


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Rendering courtesy of Modern Spaces 

Although the Long Island City real estate market is scorching hot with thousands of apartments planned, last year there were no new condo units available, said Eric Benaim, CEO of brokerage Modern Spaces.

Meanwhile, the demand for condos in the burgeoning area is climbing as more people desire to settle down in LIC after renting there for a while.

To meet demand, some planned LIC condos will come to the market this year, including a building called The Corner at 47-28 11th St., which Modern Spaces recently announced will begin selling next month.

“We are excited because we know there is a lot of demand for condos,” Benaim said. “What tends to happen is people get introduced to the area through the rentals then they live here for a while, and then they are ready to buy.”

The Corner has 23 units, which are a mix of one- and two-bedrooms. The homes feature chef kitchens and oak flooring, and some units have private outdoor space. The building also offers designer-style bathrooms with Kohler tubs, Grohe fixtures and ceramic titles.

Additionally, there are numerous amenities through The Corner, such as a fitness center, sundeck and residents’ lounge.

The condominium is being built through a joint venture partnership between Kora Developers LLC and BK Developers.

Prices for the condos have yet to be announced, and the building isn’t planned to be completed until later this year, so new homebuyers won’t be able to move in until at least the end of the year.

RECOMMENDED STORIES 

LIC community garden vies for votes to win Seeds of Change grant


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of the Dutch Kills Community Garden

A community garden in Long Island City is looking to win a grant that will allow them to add more programs and reach more people.

The Dutch Kills Community Garden, which was started in 2013, could win a grant from the Seeds of Change Grant Program if it gets enough votes to move on to the final judging phase of the program.

The community garden was started by former LIC resident Jennifer DuJat, who grew up with her family of gardeners in Long Island and later gardened on her apartment’s fire escape in the western Queens neighborhood.

After being put on waiting lists in other community gardens, DuJat reached out to real estate broker Steffan Olausson Partridge, who helped her get the LIC apartment, and asked if he knew of anyone with an empty lot willing to offer it for the garden.

Partridge mentioned he had a house on 28th Street between 38th and 39th avenues, which he rents out as a short-term vacation spot, with a back lot.

The lot then became the home of the Dutch Kills Community Garden, which this past weekend celebrated the opening of its third season and is completely open to the public.

“We are making the point that even though we have chosen to live in the city we can still live green and do things for the community,” DuJat said.

The garden’s season goes from around April until the end of September, or the first frost, and there are 13 beds of vegetables which are owned by different members of the garden.

Members take turns completing chores to keep the garden’s common space clean, and each bed is the responsibility of the member who owns it. There are some rules that members must follow while keeping a bed, such as making sure they don’t block anyone else’s bed, keeping it clean and using organic materials.

The Dutch Kills Community Garden previously won the Citizen’s Committee for New York City Neighborhood Grant in 2013 and 2014.

This year, if they receive a Seeds of Change grant, the founders plan to use the funds to expand programs, such as wine tastings, and reach more people. The money will also go toward making the garden more sustainable regarding water by creating a rain harvesting system with rain barrels.

“By supporting these kinds of things in the neighborhood it get the word out and shows people that they can be environmentally friendly,” DuJat said. “It shows that even if you are in the city you can support a community garden.”

The voting for the Seeds of Change Grant Program ends on April 27 and people can vote once a day.

To vote for the Dutch Kills Community Garden, click here.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

LIC’s SculptureCenter to get excellence in preservation award for renovation, expansion


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Images courtesy of Michael Moran

One Long Island City nonprofit is being recognized for its excellence in preserving a century-old building, home to a former trolley repair shop, and converting it into a large art institution with its recent renovation and expansion.

The SculptureCenter, located at 44-19 Purves St., has been chosen as one of nine winners of the 25th Lucy G. Moses Preservation Awards, which will hold a ceremony on April 30 in Brooklyn.

These awards, also called the “Preservation Oscars,” are known as the New York Landmarks Conservancy’s highest honors of excellence in preservation.

The Long Island City institution was chosen for its renovation of the original 1908 brick building, which it moved into in 2002, and a 2,000-square-foot expansion which complements the site. The project was designed by Andrew Berman Architect, who has also designed projects for The New York Public Library and MoMA PS1. 

“The Moses Awards celebrate terrific preservation projects. Several of this year’s award winners demonstrate how historic buildings can be adapted to meet contemporary needs and add economic vitality in neighborhoods across the city,” said Peg Breen, president of The New York Landmarks Conservancy.

The SculptureCenter’s addition, which maintains the steel and brick structure of the existing building, gives the location a street presence while also increasing gallery and programming space. The one-story building houses an entrance lobby providing guests with ticketing, orientation and services such as restroom facilities, a bookshop and various gallery spaces.

A new 1,500-square-foot enclosed courtyard was also created to be used for outdoor exhibitions and events. Some upgrades to electrical and mechanical systems and improvements in office and storage space were also made as part of the renovations.

“SculptureCenter is honored to receive this year’s Lucy G. Moses Preservation Award. Andrew Berman’s sensitive and thoughtful expansion and renovation honors the dramatic steel and brick structure of the existing building while creating a stronger street presence as well as generously proportioned new spaces for the production and display of sculpture,” said Mary Ceruti, executive director and chief curator at SculptureCenter. “As the neighborhood becomes populated with more glass and steel, we felt it was important to preserve some of its industrial history.”

RECOMMENDED STORIES

LIC Arts Open to celebrate fifth year


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photos by Junenoire Fonte

Long Island City is coming together next month to celebrate the art scene that grows every day throughout the western Queens neighborhood.

The LIC Arts Open — a five-day extravaganza where over 500 artists are expected to occupy galleries and other local spaces and open their studios to visitors — will celebrate its fifth year and hopes to work with real estate companies to help keep artists in the neighborhood.

“We’re really proud to have reached year five and I think that we did not really envision it when we first started,” said Richard Mazda, festival director. “We [started] something that even in the first year became much bigger than we thought it would.”

The festival, running from May 13 through 17, began as a two-day, open-studio event mainly showcasing visual artists. However, in its fifth year, the event now features works from visual artists, performers, musicians and so much more.

This year the festival will span 60 locations, and over 200 artists will open up their studios on Saturday, May 16, and Sunday, May 17, from noon to 6 p.m. to share their work with visitors. For the first time, there will be a preview of open studios located in the Court Square area on Friday, May 15, from 5 to 7 p.m.

Sculpture by Jack Howard-Potter at last year's LIC Arts Open.

Sculpture by Jack Howard-Potter at last year’s LIC Arts Open.

“The initial inspiration for the festival was because Queens has one of the largest concentrations of artists of any borough in New York and maybe it’s the largest concentration of artists in the country. It just hasn’t been talked about much,” Mazda said. “We have a lot of the major cultural institutions in Queens so the festival was sort of inspired by the idea that it was time to shine a light on the immense talent that is here.”

Mazda also added that there is some concern surrounding the real estate boom occurring in the neighborhood, but he plans to work with real estate property companies to “remind them that artists are a valuable component when marketing the area.”

A head sculpture made from trash bags by Beth Williams.

A head sculpture made from trash bags by Beth Williams.

The festival is working with companies such as Jamestown, which owns the Falchi Building located at 31-00 47th Ave., to showcase art shows during the LIC Arts Open.

The idea of the five-day event is also to take over buildings and spaces that are not traditional gallery locations, and create pop-up art galleries and art shows introducing the community to these industrial spaces.

Another highlight of the festival includes neighborhood nights out, where each night is dedicated to a specific area of Long Island City such as Vernon Boulevard/Jackson Avenue, Dutch Kills or Court Square.

A fundraiser will be held on May 5 at the home of LIC photographer Orestes Gonzalez. During the garden party, awards will be given to Harriet Taub, executive director of Material For the Arts, and sculptor Eliot Lable.

Map of participating venues for this year’s LIC Arts Open.

The LIC Arts Open will come to an end during a closing party at the Court Square Studios, located at 2138 44th Rd., on May 17 featuring a special concert version of the musical “Hair,” a silent auction of about 100 art pieces on 10-by-10 canvases, and performance from the Astoria band 2/3 Goat.

Every event throughout the festival is free and open to the public. For the latest updates visit licartsopen.org.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

LIC Flea & Food celebrates grand reopening this weekend


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

File photo

Spring is finally here and what better way to celebrate the warmer weather than to take a trip down to the LIC Flea & Food.

The popular Long Island City flea market, located at an outdoor lot by the waterfront at the corner of Fifth Street and 46th Avenue, will kick off its third season on Saturday, April 11, with a ribbon cutting ceremony at 11 a.m.

“We are thrilled to kick off our third season of LIC Flea & Food bringing together amazing vendors and the community for both our outdoor season and indoor holiday market,” said LIC Flea & Food President Joshua Schneps. “We look forward to a great season ahead and offering a place for visitors to come for the day to enjoy the flea, the waterfront park, surrounding businesses and all that Long Island City has to offer.”

Items for sale at the market include food and drinks, collectibles, antiques, arts and crafts, handcrafted jewelry and fashion, and much more.

Along with over 80 vendors each day, the market will also have a beer garden, exclusively serving beers brewed in Queens from local breweries including Rockaway Brewery, Queens Brewery, Finback and SingleCut. The bar will also offer a great selection of wines.
LIC Flea & Food will run every Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., through the end of October.

For updates on the LIC Flea & Food market, follow on Facebook.com/LICFlea, Instagram.com/LICFlea and @LICFlea on twitter.

Applications from potential vendors for the new season are still being accepted by registering online at www.licflea.com.

Here’s the list of vendors that will be at the market for opening weekend:

As I See It
Bad Nana
Balance Center Harmony
Bao Shoppe (The)
Breads & Spreads, LLC
Bull Dog Burgery
Bundts NYC
Butcher Bar
CakeBox NYC
Catharsis Co.
Ceil Witherspoon
Cait’s Carnivores
Chuta Madre!
Creations by Cameca, LLC
Cris Pietro Designs
Curry Station
Czechout Jewelry
Damian Rivera
Drink More Good
East Coast Roast, Inc.
Emily Militano
Esta-Joy’s Kitchen
Hanks Juicy Beef
Heart & Soul Foods
Himalayan Collections (The)
House Project (The)
Jack ‘n Pack
Jessy’s Pastries
Jewelry by Anna Harper
Kati Shack
Khao Man Gai
Krista Stained Glass
Lady V’Second Time Around
Lizzmonade LLC
LodestarNYC Jewelry
Lucy & Leo
Luke’s Lobster
Lumpia Merienda
Miriam Vargas
Miroslava Palavicini Leather Belts
Mizudama
mmm enfes Turkish Food
Mountain Side Crafts
Nighthawk’s Kitchen
No Fork
Nomad Truck
Oconomi
Paris Images Screen Printing
Pickle Me Pete
PDA Planters
Queen Tut Creationz
Queens3
QueensPopPhoto
Rice and Chopsticks
Rita’s Water Ice
Roobrics
Sac’s Pizza Place
Sam’s Ice Cream
Sensational Sauces
Seoul Pancake
Siggy Parker’s General Store
Southern Wheel Eats
Steve Reid
StuffedNYC
SunsTruck
SupremeLuv
Tea n’ Milk
Tikka Pops
Ukuva iAfrica USA, INC.
Village Peddlers
Vivian Jewelry Corp
Volpe Vintage
We See Stars
Woops!
Yadviga -Candles
Yankee Doodle Dandys
Tik Kitchen
Toy Room Treasures
Yuyi Love Works

RECOMMENDED STORIES

City Planning extends public comment period for mayor’s citywide rezoning plan


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Christopher Bride/PropertyShark

The Department of City Planning is giving residents more time to express concerns about Mayor Bill de Blasio’s citywide rezoning plan, following criticisms at a recent public hearing.

The public comment period was originally scheduled to end on April 6 but has been extended to April 30 for the proposal, Zoning for Quality and Affordability, which is a significant part of Blasio’s plan to create or preserve 200,000 affordable housing units citywide in 10 years.

De Blasio hopes more than 11,250 of those affordable units will be built over the Sunnyside Yards in Long Island City, an idea that has also taken heat from residents and elected officials.

The citywide proposal targets changing zoning regulations to encourage the construction of more affordable and senior housing as well as improve the look and quality of buildings.

Part of the proposal would, for example, reduce parking requirements for buildings in neighborhoods with public transit options or that have low car ownership, which will help lower construction costs; the report claims this would reduce costs for housing.

The plan also seeks to ease rules that shape buildings and allow more design flexibility for developers in high-density areas by increasing height maximums in many areas up to 15 feet and reducing setback requirements. This could help developers to create bigger buildings with higher floor-to-floor heights and better layouts.

However, critics at the public hearing on March 25 have said that there hasn’t been enough publicizing of the plan. Residents fear that larger buildings will be built in some historic neighborhoods that have fought for strict contextual zoning regulations to protect the character of the areas, such as Jackson Heights.

Some also criticized that since many buildings will have only 20 percent affordable housing to meet city subsidy programs, mostly market-rate or luxury units will be built through the housing initiative.

Following the public comment period, the city planning will produce amendments to the proposal and another round of public review will begin.

Click here for a summary of the plan or here for the detailed draft.

RECOMMENDED STORIES 

Community project ideas on display at Sunnyside participatory budgeting expo


| editorial@ridgewoodtimes.com

Photo by Kelly Marie Mancuso

BY KELLY MARIE MANCUSO

Residents in the 26th City Council District got the chance to view project proposals that will be put to a public vote later this month during Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer’s participatory budgeting (PB) project expo Monday night at Sunnyside Community Services.

“This is a chance for residents of this district to really get a visual of the projects that are going to be on the ballot a week from now,” explained Amanda Nasner, PB delegate and Special Projects representative from Van Bramer’s office. “This is just a good visual to help people get excited about participatory budgeting.”

Van Bramer is one of 24 City Council members who have each allocated $1 million in discretionary funds for public improvement projects aimed at helping the community. Budget delegates from District 26—which encompasses all or parts of Astoria, Long Island City, Sunnyside and Woodside—showcased their project ideas through vibrant displays and posters.

Many of the project proposals called for improvements to the district’s schools. Jennifer Munoz, a sophomore at the Academy of American Studies, advocated for much-needed auditorium repairs at Newcomers High School in Dutch Kills. At 15, Munoz is one of the youngest budget delegates in the district.

According to Munoz, the Academy of American Studies and Newcomers High School share the same auditorium. The project would replace the auditorium seating and upgrade the sound system at a projected cost of $250,000.

“Basically, the auditorium is being used a lot, so we need to fix it up,” Munoz explained. “They have broken chairs, so we’re trying to get them fixed.”

Other proposed school improvement projects include the installation of security cameras outside Bryant High School, resurfacing the P.S. 112 playground, and a series of technology upgrades at P.S./I.S. 78, P.S. 11, I.S. 204, P.S. 166, P.S. 12 and Aviation High School.

Woodside resident Tom Ryan and his daughter Katherine spoke in favor of the Woodside Reforestry project, which would fund the planting of Parks Department-approved trees along both sides of Broadway, from 48th Street to 69th Street, at a cost of $200,000.

“There are no trees there. It’s barren,” Ryan said. According to Ryan, both he and his fellow Northern Woodside Coalition members would assume the responsibility of watering and caring for the trees.

Miki Bairstow, a delegate from the Housing Committee, was on hand to advocate for six project ideas, including the installation of security cameras and playground upgrades at the Queensbridge, Ravenswood and Woodside Houses.

Kenny Medrano presented four project proposals on behalf of the Library Committee, including the installation of ADA-compliant push-button access for handicapped and wheelchair-bound patrons at both the Sunnyside and Woodside public library branches.

Several delegates proposed transportation improvements throughout the district. Nancy Silverman spoke in favor of a $55,000 proposal to provide seniors at the Jacob Riis Settlement House in Queensbridge with a 10-passenger van for day trips and various group outings. Ray Johnson and his fellow Transportation Committee delegates advocated for the $500,000 LIC Bikeway, the installation of bus bulbs at 31st Street and five real-time passenger information countdown clocks at bus stops district-wide.

Residents will vote for their favorite projects between April 11 to 19 at various locations throughout the district. Click here for details.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

 

 

 

Former LIC cigar factory could be converted for residential use


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Modern Spaces

Another old factory building in Long Island City is up for grabs and could see a residential conversion.

Real estate firm Modern Spaces announced on Thursday that its commercial properties division is marketing the former DeNobili Cigar Factory at 35-11 9th St. The four-story building was recently renovated and is “ideally positioned for residential conversion” being that the site is zoned for residential use, according to the real estate firm.

“The pace of development in Long Island City is showing no signs of slowing,” said Evan Daniel, executive vice president of Modern Spaces’ commercial division. “Not only does this property enjoy a current high occupancy, but with the R5 zoning and accessory lot, it holds a great deal of promise for a residential conversion.”

Daniel is marketing the property with Edward DiTomasso.

The building has a total of 102,670 square feet and was constructed in 1896. It has potentially attractive features if it were to be converted for residential use, including 20-foot ceilings, exposed beams, hardwood floors and arched windows.

The former cigar factory currently has 57 commercial units and two cell towers.

There is also an adjacent vacant lot connected to the site at 35-31 9th St., which has more than 6,000 buildable square feet.

RECOMMENDED STORIES 

Disabled 7 train disrupts morning service between Queens and Manhattan


| rpozarycki@queenscourier.com

File photo

Updated 10:49 a.m.

Service on the 7 line between Long Island City and Manhattan has been restored with delays after a two-hour disruption due to a disabled train, according to the MTA.

Sources said train crews reported a smoke condition on a 7 train near Grand Central Station at about 8:34 a.m., causing the train to stop between stations.

Upon further investigation, MTA workers determined that the smoke emanated from a contact shoe touching the third rail, which powers the train.

Power was turned off, and the MTA dispatched a rescue train to get all passengers safely off the disabled train and sent to Grand Central Station, an MTA spokesperson said.

All 7 train service between Hunters Point Avenue and Grand Central was halted as crews worked to remove the passengers and resolve the situation. According to the MTA’s website, at 10:32 a.m. 7 line service was restored, but with delays in both directions.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

LIC Flea & Food to kick off new season with ribbon cutting ceremony


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photo by Bradley Hawks

With only two weekends until the grand opening day at the LIC Flea & Food, there are many vendors to make sure you check out when taking the trip down to the market.

The popular Long Island City flea market, located at an outdoor lot by the waterfront at the corner of Fifth Street and 46th Avenue, will reopen on Saturday, April 11.

Items for sale include food and drinks, collectibles, antiques, arts and crafts, handcrafted jewelry and fashion, and much more.

There will be a ribbon cutting ceremony on April 11 at 11 a.m. at the entrance of the market located at 5-25 46th Ave. to officially start the season.

LIC Flea & Food will run every Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., through the end of October.

Applications from potential vendors for the new season are still being accepted by registering online at www.licflea.com.

1. Rita’s NYC
At Rita’s NYC, their tag line is happiness. They have the freshest and highest-quality ices in a variety of delicious, natural flavors to choose from. Stop by and see for yourself for the first time at the LIC Flea & Food and they promise your first visit won’t be your last. The dose of happiness will vary as the flavors do every weekend, but their promise of happiness is one that they always keep. As a Rita’s guest your happiness is their number one priority. They always greet you with a friendly smile and serve you in a New York minute.

2. Curry Station
Curry Station brings the Malaysian experience from the home to the streets of New York. With mom’s mouthwatering curry sauce, it will be cooked with fish balls, chicken and shrimp. While enjoying one (or all) of these spicy dishes, have a sip of Curry Station’s refreshing Barley Drink. Their sauce and barley drinks are all homemade so come out and have a taste!

3. Lady V Second Time Around
An original vintage and vintage-inspired fashion clothing shop with shoes, handbags, accessories and collectibles known for her high-energy personality and style. “We are affordable and sell quality vintage and repurposed clothing.” Each item is coupled with a signature positive affirmation message.

4. Seoul Pancake
Seoul Pancake is the premier source for the best authentic Korean cuisine in New York. Send your palate on a journey with the scallion and kimchi pancakes, then wash it down with a cool, refreshing sikhye. All selections are homemade from family recipes and come either vegan-friendly or with a selection of delectable meats and cheeses — all guaranteed to please.

5. Stern Design Works
Stern Design Works was founded eight years ago by husband-and-wife team Cameron and Rebecca Stern with the mission of creating thought-provoking jewelry and small form sculpture revolving around themes including science, history, technology and the realm of fantasy. Their work is based in traditional metalsmithing, mixed with more modern methods such as in-house digital design/3D printing and bio-plastic resins.

6. Siggy Parker’s General Store
Pickers, collectors and purveyors of unique and fun items — Siggy Parker’s General Store out of Cape Fear, North Carolina, has something for just about everyone. They travel across the country looking for what they like to call “vintage funk and fine junk,” and they don’t like to specialize in any one thing. Siggy Parker’s always packs its booth full of vintage bicycles, furniture, clothes, skateboards, retro kitsch, magazines, rock ‘n’ roll, movie memorabilia and so much more.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Three NYC college students move forward in Red Bull’s worldwide paper plane competition


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Red Bull FMS, Alli Brodsky

A trio of New York City college students got their wings this past weekend in Long Island City and only plan on aiming higher.

Over 500 students from seven city universities and colleges gathered on March 29 at Studio Square in LIC to vie for a spot in the worldwide competition called Red Bull Paper Wings.

The participants were asked to create paper planes out of material provided during the day of the competition, which was judged by professional skydiver and Red Bull athlete Jeff Provenzano.

Out of the hundreds which represented schools such as Manhattan College, and New York, Columbia, St. John’s, Hofstra, Fordham, and Rutgers universities, three came out victorious.

David Sander from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute won Longest Airtime with four seconds, Kevin Maghami from NYU Medical won Best Aerobatics with a score of 29 out of 30 points from judges, and Anthony Giacomelli won Longest Distance with 69 feet.

These students’ times will now be compared to others in the region. A total of 12 winners – made up of the top in each category per region – will be selected in two weeks as finalists and get to attend Red Bull’s World Finals in Salzburg, Austria on May 8 and 9.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

More Queens Library locations loaning mobile hot spots, tablets


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Queens Library

Having fun isn’t hard when you’ve got a library card, and now more cardholders will be able to stay connected while on the go.

The Queens Library announced Tuesday that it will be expanding its mobile technology lending program in the upcoming weeks to more libraries throughout the borough.

While using their Queens Library cards, customers will be able to borrow free mobile hot spots, providing Internet access anywhere to any Wi-Fi-enabled devices with cellphone reception. Customers will also have the chance to borrow free Google Nexus tablets.

The hot spots are available for one month, and there are three renewals available afterwards. First-time hot spot borrowers will have to sign an agreement and bring a photo ID.

Locations that have been offering the free mobile hot spots and tablets since last year include branches at 89-11 Merrick Blvd., Jamaica; 1637 Central Ave., Far Rockaway; 108-19 71st Ave., Forest Hills; 41-17 Main St., Flushing; and 35-51 81st St., Jackson Heights.

The new locations offering the hot spots include 214-20 Northern Blvd. in Bayside and 37-44 21st St. in Long Island City. They will also be available at the branch at 218-13 Linden Blvd. in Cambria Heights starting April 8; 193-20 Horace Harding Expressway in Fresh Meadows on April 15; and 169-09 137th Ave. in Rochdale Village on April 22.

The Google Nexus tablets are now available at Queens Library branches at 2012 Madison St. in Ridgewood; 128-16 Rockaway Blvd. in South Ozone Park; and 169-09 137th Ave. in Rochdale Village. Starting later this month, the tablets will be available at the following locations: 187-05 Union Turnpike in Hillcrest; 103-34 Lefferts Blvd. in Richmond Hill; and the Langston Hughes Community Library at 100-01 Northern Blvd.

A full list of borrowing sites is available at www.queenslibrary.org.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Coyote discovered on roof of Long Island City bar


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Brian Porter/Laura Süpper

Updated 1:55 p.m.

BY CRISTABELLE TUMOLA AND ANGY ALTAMIRANO 

A “well-fed” coyote made its way onto the roof of a Long Island City bar Monday morning before escaping into a nearby building, according to witnesses.

The establishment’s owner, Brian Porter of LIC Bar, received a text message and photo that morning from a tenant above the bar alerting him to the wild animal.

When he arrived at the 45-58 Vernon Blvd. bar and saw the coyote hanging out beneath his air conditioning unit, he immediately noticed it looked liked a “well-fed animal.”

“It stood out that this animal, this coyote was pretty big. And it didn’t look like he was hungry,” he said.

Porter called police and animal control was contacted, and they tried to capture the coyote with tranquilizer guns and catching poles. A veterinarian from a nearby clinic also went up to inspect, thinking the animal might be a dog, but quickly backed off once she saw it wasn’t one.

Photo by Paula Kirby

Photo by Paula Kirby

The animal eventually escaped into a window of the old Paragon Paint building, according to Porter, who believes the coyote got onto the roof by coming through a broken window of that building, which is adjacent to his bar.

He doesn’t know how the animal wandered into the neighborhood, but insists the rooftop visit wasn’t a clever publicity move.

That evening The Coyote Anderson Quartet was scheduled to perform at LIC Bar.

“It would be a little bit of a stretch if I was trying to pull that off as a PR stunt,” Porter said.

And even though the animal caused some chaos on Monday, this isn’t the first time a coyote has made it into the Big Apple.

Recent sightings of the four-legged animal go back to last year when a park-goer spotted a coyote in the Bronx, according to the NY Daily News. Another coyote was caught in January as it found itself trapped in an Upper West Side basketball court, according to the New York Post.

Coyotes started to be seen in northern New York in the 1930s, according to The New York Times, and by 1994 were noticed in the Bronx.

According to Park officials, three Bronx parks are now each home to a coyote family and there is a solitary coyote permanently living in Railroad Park in Jamaica, The Times said.

The Parks Department now plans to educate the public by posting fliers and distributing cards that outline “Five Easy Tips for Coyote Coexistence,” The Times reported. Some tips include not feeding the coyotes, storing food and garbage in animal-proof containers, and if approached by one you should “act big and make loud noises.”

Mary Pearl, the provost at Macaulay Honors College, who has a doctorate in wildlife biology, said coyotes can thrive in human habitation.

“They can eat everything and anything,” she said, including pet food, rodents, stray cats and dogs, and even berries and insects in the spring and summer.

Pearl, noting that a witness said the animal looked far from scrawny, said March and April was birthing season, and the building may be a good retreat for an expectant mother. But she added male coyotes can travel great distances.

Her best guess was that the coyote found its way to Long Island City via railroad tracks or possibly a parkway.

Despite recent sightings in the city, Pearl cautions that they are not infestation, since the creatures distribute themselves sparsely, and the animals help our ecosystem by getting rid of rodents and roadkill.

“Too often we have a response when we see wildlife in our midst that they should be removed,” she said.

“[Coyotes] don’t inundate a place, but it’s just surprising.”

Field staff from the Animal Care & Control of NYC visited the location, spoke to a witness and searched the area, but no additional sightings have been reported. Coyote sightings should be reported to 311, and but any animal “presenting imminent public safety risk” should be reported to 911.

Members of the community are being advised that if they come in contact or see the animal they should call the police immediately and not attempt to capture it.

Officers out of the 108th Precinct have been instructed to remain vigilant for the coyote while they are on patrol.

RECOMMENDED STORIES