Tag Archives: Long Island City

Crescent Grill: A master class in hospitality


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo by Bradley Hawks

BY BRADLEY HAWKS

The walls of the restaurant beyond the white gallery are covered in reclaimed wood with headlights dangling from the ceiling above the bar that is lined with candy apple red vintage bucket stools. Dangling from distressed wooden beams adorning the walls, paintings from a local artist are carefully displayed throughout the room. After all, the restaurant has its own curator. I stifle a chuckle at the timing of the song playing overhead. It’s Belinda Carlisle crooning, “Heaven is a Place on Earth.”

“Welcome to Crescent Grill,” greets the hostess with a sincere, warm smile. Her uncles — brothers Dan and Shaun Dougherty — share ownership of the restaurant, and they both greet me soon thereafter. As a couple enters just behind me, Dan greets them by name. Shocked, the young woman replies with an enthusiastic, “Now that is impressive.”

“We want everybody to enjoy the food, and just because it is fresh and organic doesn’t mean it needs to be over-the-moon expensive,” says Shaun of his menu. “And we don’t buy from anyone unless I have visited their farm and witnessed their practices firsthand.” As he finishes the last sentence, his iPhone buzzes with a text message from one of the farms. “It’s just a text from John at Cascuns about my order this week,” he explains. He also grinds his own meat and sources his own cheese.

IMG_5709

Dan was the first brother to make the move to New York City from Pennsylvania in 1982, fresh from college. Shaun, too, fell in love with New York, and eventually moved out to join his brother. “I have always thought that this city is exactly what this country is meant to be — so many ethnicities and religions living — for the most part — in peace.”

The journey for the brothers has not been without its challenges, but they now have a liquor license and an executive chef besides Shaun. “It was hard to step back and let someone else take over,” admits Shaun, “but our chef does a killer job.”

Milton Enriquez grew up by Kaufman Astoria Studios. “I love cooking New American cuisine,” explains the chef, “because it allows the use of global ingredients and loads of creativity.”

IMG_5670

His asparagus appetizer features a log cabin of green spears over pickled maitake mushrooms, with a creamy egg that has been poached over low heat, that gently breaks over crunchy Serrano ham. A risotto of crisp English peas is studded with tender shreds of duck confit, bound together with Parmigiano Reggiano.

Entrees include butter-poached lobster, coconut curried diver sea scallops, and a phenomenal $29 prix fixe that includes options like a rustic strozzapreti pasta with summer squash and fresh mozzarella. One of the most exceptional bites I tasted is the sublime Magret duck resting on a bed of spring garlic, baby turnips, fiddlehead ferns, and an addictive strawberry paint smeared in a teardrop across the plate. “We can still offer fiddleheads, even though their season just ended,” explains the chef. “I always pickle my seasonal vegetables near the end, so we can make them last a little longer — and everyone will be calling me soon to borrow some.”

IMG_5164

“Simplicity makes good things,” smiles the chef as I am presented with dessert. A pistachio wafer has been placed atop a silicon mold filled with pistachio mousse. Once the mousse has set, it is flipped onto a plate, and the dome is coated with dark chocolate and crushed Sicilian pistachios, then adorned with a candied vanilla bean, miniature cubes of amaretto gelee, and a quenelle of pistachio ice cream. The mousse is more velvety than any I have tasted, and I literally go nuts over the dessert. The desserts are courtesy of the pastry chef, Blanca Castro, and I will definitely return for more.

As if the evening had not already surpassed all expectations, I was met at the door by a car waiting to take me home. Crescent Grill actually offers its own complimentary shuttle service if you live within their pickup zone. From door to door and back again, it is one of the most enjoyable evenings I have spent in Astoria. Crescent Grill is now near the top of places I would highly recommend.

Crescent Grill
38-40 Crescent St.
718-729-4040
www.CrescentGrill.com

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Hybrid batteries stolen from 12 cars in 108th Precinct


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo via Flickr Creative Commons/Shoreline

In the past few months, car thieves have been walking away with more than just personal items when breaking into the trunks of some hybrid vehicles in western Queens.

According to the 108th Precinct, which covers Long Island City, Sunnyside and Woodside, since November expensive hybrid batteries have been stolen out of the trunks of 12 hybrid Toyota Camrys in the area. The majority have been taken from Long Island City.

All of the vehicles, which can run on electrical power as well as a gasoline engine, have been taxis and include 10 yellow cabs and two livery vehicles.

The batteries cost from $2,000 to $3,000. They also have no serial numbers, making them untraceable, according to Debra Markell Kleinert, district manager of Community Board 2.

“The 108th is being proactive and working with the community to try to resolve this issue,” Markell Kleinert said.

The incidents are currently under investigation by the Grand Larceny Squad and 108th Precinct’s Detective Squad.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

R train rider busted for committing lewd act


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

A smiling straphanger caught on camera after allegedly fondling himself on a Queens R train last month has been arrested, cops said.

The man was on the train, which was near the Queens Plaza station in Long Island City, about 5:40 p.m. on Jan. 23, when he committed the lewd act.

While sitting on the train, he put his hands in his pants and started to fondle himself in front of a 47-year-old woman, cops said. The man then got off the subway at the next stop.

Before exiting the train, he was caught on camera, with one shot capturing him “saying cheese.”

The man allegedly shown in the photos that were released by police — 33-year-old Wilmer Busto —  was charged with public lewdness, police said Wednesday.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

 

 

LIC-based grocery delivery service aimed for mom and pop stores


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Images courtesy of Pickup Later

One new delivery service is trying to level the playing field for local mom and pop shops battling the big, online food delivery companies by offering customers the option to have groceries delivered within hours of placing an order at neighborhood stores.

PickUpLater, a Long Island City-based online grocery service started at the end of 2014, allows customers to go on their website and order from a local store’s inventory.

As a resident of Long Island City for the past six years, owner Kodjo Hounnaké said the idea was born after he was ordering from GrubHub and he asked himself why such a service was not available for groceries from local stores. 

Although Hounnaké says he aims for the service to go nationwide, PickUpLater currently only offers customers groceries from Foodcellar & Co. Market, located at 4-85 47th Rd. The service is available for residents in Long Island City, Hunters Point, Astoria, Greenpoint, Sunnyside and Woodside. It has also started to deliver in Manhattan, below 59th Street. 

PickUpLater owner Kodjo Hounnaké

PickUpLater owner Kodjo Hounnaké

The delivery areas are expected to expand, once Foodcellar opens its second location in Court Square. 

Unlike giants like Fresh Direct, Hounnaké added that PickUpLater has groceries directly from the store, not from a warehouse. Also unlike grocery delivery service, Instacart, which delivers from large stores such as Whole Foods Market and Costco, the idea of PickUpLater is to stick to the local mom and pop shops. 

“We’re not [the grocery store’s] competitor; what we offer them is to remove that extra cost and that extra stress,” Hounnaké said. “We’ll come in and do everything for them. In a sense we are their ally not their competition.”

Once the customer places an order on www.pickuplater.com, a personal shopper then does the work of purchasing the items on the list. Keeping an emphasis on “real time interaction with customers,” the personal shopper will text or call customers with any updates or replacement options.

The groceries will then be delivered in two hours, or more, depending on the customer’s request. They also have the option to pick up the products from Foodcellar.

For orders over $35, pick up fees are $0.99. Deliveries scheduled for more than two hours, the fee is $3.99 and $5.99 for deliveries scheduled within two hours.

PickUpLater opens at 7 a.m. and deliveries are scheduled between 9 a.m. and 11 p.m. Pickup hours are from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

LIC Industrial Business Zone receives more than $100K in funding


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Liam La Guerre

The fight to maintain the balance between the residential boom and industrial sector in Long Island City got a helping hand from the City Council.

The Long Island City Industrial Business Zone (IBZ), which is one of many dedicated manufacturing sectors in a citywide initiative that focuses on preserving industry, received nearly 25 percent more funds from the city this year than 2014, a total of $100,946.

Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer allocated the funds and made the announcement on Monday among business owners, City Councilman Antonio Reynoso of Brooklyn and Elizabeth Lusskin, president of the nonprofit Long Island City Partnership, which oversees the LIC IBZ.

“This year we fought really hard, and I wanted to make sure that we were able to increase funding so that Liz Lusskin and her amazing team could help all of these businesses grow and we maintain these areas and not take them for other uses,” Van Bramer said.

Last year there was talk that the IBZ program could lose money. But Van Bramer said Reynoso lead a charge in the City Council to support the initiative.

In addition to the extra financial support, the LIC IBZ will return to assisting an area with just six ZIP codes, as opposed to the widespread 16 ZIP codes it was tasked to help last year — including many outside its district. This will allow administrators more flexibility to focus on the 2,095 businesses in its immediate area, instead of 4,535 companies.

“Instead of spending an hour sitting on a train to go to a business in Flushing, we can spend an hour walking the halls of the Falchi Building knocking on doors, seeing if we can provide help,” Lusskin said.

The money from the City Council is separate from the recent $100,000 grant the LIC Partnership received from the New York City Regional Economic Development Council to perform a comprehensive neighborhood study.

This new batch of money will provide resources for manufacturing businesses, such as help to apply for city tax credits, filing permits and even dealing with neighborhood issues. The IBZ will also help businesses network with each other.

The Long Island City Partnership hopes through servicing businesses, they can entice companies to stay and expand in Queens, and convince others to move into the area.

Officials cited jewelry maker Unique Settings of New York, which is now located at the Falchi Building in Long Island City, as an example of what they are trying to accomplish. Eight years ago, the company was leaving its 9,000-square-foot Manhattan space for a location in New Jersey.

But Unique Settings moved to Queens after the LIC IBZ helped get city tax credits and found the space they needed to expand.

The firm now has about 65,000 square feet on one floor of the Falchi Building and 200 employees.

“We talked to them, they guided us through the program and basically held our hands through the whole process,” said Matthew Ego, co-owner of Unique Settings. “One less thing you have to worry about is making sure that you’re going to be able to stay and grow.”

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Water purifier design selected for MoMA PS1’s 2015 Warm Up music series


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Images courtesy of Andrés Jaque/Office for Political Innovation

This summer, MoMA PS1 will glow with awareness during its annual music series.

The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 in Long Island City have selected architect Andrés Jaque and his firm, the Office for Political Innovation, as the winner of the 16th annual Young Architects Program (YAP).

In Jaque’s project, called COSMO, he addresses the United Nation’s statistic estimating that by 2025 two thirds of the global population will live in countries that have a shortage of water.

The winning design expected to open at MoMA PS1’s courtyard in late June, was chosen from five finalists to serve as the temporary urban landscape for the 2015 Warm Up summer music series. The project is mobile, moving with the partygoers, and is made out of customized irrigation mechanisms.

Every year the winners develop creative designs for a temporary outdoor installation at the museum located at 22-25 Jackson Ave. that would provide shade, seating and water to those who attend the series. The architects also have to address environmental issues, such as sustainability and recycling.

“Last year, ‘Hy-Fi,’ a nearly zero carbon footprint construction by The Living, raised awareness of ecological and climate change. This year COSMO continues to do so, addressing the issue of increasingly scarce water supplies worldwide in a successful and innovative way,” said Klaus Biesenbach, MoMA PS1 director and MoMA chief curator at large.

COSMO has been engineered to filter and purify 3,000 gallons of water, “eliminating suspended particles and nitrates, balancing the PH, and increasing the level of dissolved oxygen,” according to MoMA PS1. It takes a total of four days for the 3,000 gallons to be purified..

As part of Jacque’s biochemical design, the stretched-out plastic mesh at the core of COSMO will automatically glow whenever water is purified.

“Relying on off-the-shelf components from agro-industrial origin, exuberant mobile architecture celebrates water-purification processes and turns their intricate visualization into an unusual backdrop for the Warm Up sessions,” said Pedro Gadanho, curator in MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Selling point: LIC Wills Group building sold for $43.5M — and more big sales


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Scott Bintner/Propertyshark

A number of properties in Queens sold for big prices recently, according to city property records. Here’s a run down of interesting transactions over the past week.

Address: 43-01 21st St.
Price: $43,500,000

The Wills Group Family Limited Partnership sold its commercial building in Long Island City at 43-01 21st St. for $43.5 million, according to city property filings recorded on Friday. The property is a three-story building with more than 120,000 square feet of space. The buyer is listed as Chicago-based 43-01 21st Street Eat LLC, although developer Rockrose was in contract for it last year, according to a published report.

Address: 55-02 Broadway
Price: $9,000,000

Manhattan-based 55 Broadway Realty LLC picked up this mixed-use office and factory building in Woodside for $9 million, according to city records. The one-story building has just over 30,000 square feet of space.

Address: 5 Court Square/28-24 Jackson Ave.
Price: $15,750,000

This building, which sits across the street from the Citibank Building in Long Island City, was in high demand because of its developmental potential in a hot neighborhood. At nearly 8,000 square feet, current zoning laws allow a future development to be nearly eight times bigger. AF Court Square LLC sold the building to Jackson 2524 LLC, a Great Neck-based firm, which filed to construct a mixed-use residential and commercial 11-story building with 73 units on the site last year. The project was disapproved by the Buildings Department.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Real estate investors shelled out $3.6 billion for Queens properties last year


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Scott Bintner/PropertyShark

Queens’ relatively low land prices, access to public transportation and growing popularity has helped the borough attract a significantly larger amount of money from real estate investors in 2014 than in previous years, according to a new report.

Firms and individuals shelled out about $3.65 billion last year to buy Queens investment properties—large-scale real estate costing at least $850,000—which is a 25 percent increase from 2013, according to a report by Ariel Property Advisors.

The study pointed out that about one-third of the investment properties in Queens last year were development sites, which alone accounted for more than $1 billion, or a 191 percent gain when compared to 2012.

“Queens still presents developers with the opportunity to produce large-scale developments, and they are willing to pay a premium for prime sites,” said Daniel Wechsler, vice president of Ariel Property Advisors.

Photo courtesy of Ariel Property Advisors

Photo courtesy of Ariel Property Advisors

Wechsler pointed out that land parcels with at least 50,000 square feet of buildable rights were purchased all over “The World’s Borough,” including Astoria, Long Island City, Elmhurst, Woodside, Glendale, Jamaica, Ridgewood and Flushing, “further indicating the bullish attitude of investors on the entire borough. “

The report found that 925 properties were traded during the year, which is also a 25 percent year-over-year increase.

Some of the year’s highest profile transactions include the $110 million sale of the Standard Motors Building in Long Island City, which traded for just $70 million in 2008, and the sale of a 53-building portfolio in Kew Gardens Hills for $216 million.

There was also the $26.5 million sale of a garage near Queens Place mall in Elmhurst, which has about 227,352 buildable square feet.

Click here to read the full report.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Astoria mom teaches baby sign language to begin communication between child and parents


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Rebecca Raymond

Parents in Astoria will now be able to figure out what their babies want before they even learn how to speak.

Rebecca Raymond is the instructor behind My Smart Hands NYC, the New York City franchise of a company started by Laura Berg in Canada, which aims to teach children and parents American Sign Language to promote communication early in life.

Raymond, an Astoria resident, first heard about baby signing when her sister-in-law began signing with her nephew. With her interest in languages, majoring in Spanish and English in college, she then decided to begin teaching her then-5-month-old daughter how to sign.

Rebecca Raymond

Rebecca Raymond

“I just love languages and I thought it would be fun to teach her,” Raymond said. “Every single day seeing her sign there were new things I was learning about her.”

Her daughter took around two months to pick up the signs and realize that it was a way to communicate with her mother. Raymond taught her how to sign words such as “milk” and “light” and noticed her daughter was learning through her modeling. 

“Every time I would say a particular word I would sign it to her,” Raymond said. “It’s easier to pick up the word rather than the strain of sound.”

She later also taught her second daughter how to sign. Raymond said that teaching children how to sign at such a young age reduces the level of frustration that comes from not being able to communicate with their parents or caregivers. She added that learning ASL increases the children’s self-esteem and self-confidence because their needs are met more quickly.

“Once your baby starts to figure out what they are doing with their hands is actually helping you communicate, then they pick it up fast,” Raymond said.

One important thing that parents have to keep in mind is being consistent in teaching their children, according to Raymond. Babies usually are not able to sign until they are 6 months old and begin picking up many signs between 7 to 12 months of age.

Rebecca Raymond's daughter signing the word "bed."

Rebecca Raymond’s daughter signing the word “bed,” one of the signs she still remembers from when she was a baby.

Raymond teaches parents out of their homes in either Astoria or Long Island City, and also at local bookstores and shops. Starting in March, she will begin giving Saturday classes at Raising Astoria, located at, 26-11 23rd Ave., as part of an eight-week course. Parents who are interested in taking part in the course can register on www.mysmarthandsnyc.com. Registration comes with a book and CD.

For more information visit www.mysmarthandsnyc.com or email rebecca@mysmarthands.com.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Couple creates ‘nerdy’ treats at LIC’s Entrepreneur Space


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of 8 Bit Bakeshop

One East Elmhurst couple is using their love for all things “geeky” and “nerdy” to create delicious treats for every occasion.

Hannah Maldonado and Matthew McNamee met in 2012 and felt an instant connection with their interest in comic books and video games. One day they decided to drive around looking for “something nerdy to snack on” and couldn’t find anything they could get enthusiastic about.

“I’ve never had a tolerance for normal. I’ve always been the black sheep of my family,” Maldonado said. “When Matthew and I met, our friendship was based on all the nerdy things we liked.”

Photo by Darryl Brooks

Photo by Darryl Brooks

Not finding what they were looking for sparked the idea to start a business in which Maldonado, who studied pastry arts and was not content in working at other bakeries, would create her own treats. McNamee, an aircraft mechanic for Jet Blue Airways, would be in charge of any construction.

The idea then transformed into the 8 Bit Bakeshop, which at first started out of their house. The name refers to the beginning of video games and the products sold are inspired by video games and comic books, such as Super Mario, Pokémon, Deadpool, and others.

In 2013 they started to test their product at New York Comic Con to see if people would be interested. To their surprise they were met with thousands of people congratulating their work.

“Oddly enough the fan base is there and it is a lot bigger than we thought it would be,” Maldonado said. “It just makes me feel so good because it’s a niche that is so untapped. It’s great with the old crowds and it’s great to see young people into it, too.”

Now, working out of the business incubator Entrepreneur Space in Long Island City, the 8 Bit Bakeshop is known for its sugar cookies, individually decorated by Maldonado and a team of volunteers, cupcakes and a line of fudge and cakes in various flavors. They also create alcohol-infused pastries and huge sugar cookies, which are covered in icing to resemble comic book covers or pages.

They also feature a line of treats called “Little Luna,” named after the couple’s Type 1 diabetic daughter, which includes diabetic-friendly, vegan and vegetarian versions of their products. They are in the process of trying to create kosher and gluten-free items as well.

“We just want to add more love, and who doesn’t love food? And we want to make sure we don’t exclude anyone,” Maldonado added.

Along with being creative in the kitchen, one thing that makes the team of the 8 Bit Bakeshop stand out is that when they hit conventions, like New York Comic Con, they show up as personalities from video games and comic books as a form of cosplay.

Photo by Darryl Brooks

Photo by Darryl Brooks

“We want to sell the experience, not just the product,” Maldonado said. “We like to take away the counter. So when you see us selling stuff, you almost never see us behind the table.”

Maldonado said that there are plans in the future to open a store, but they first want to spread the word of the 8 Bit Bakeshop by traveling around the country and setting up booths at conventions.

They are also in the process of creating a “nerdy food box” subscription service called Byte, in which people from across the country would subscribe and be sent a box full of treats from the 8 Bit Bakeshop. They plan to beta test the product this summer.

“The best part is that Matthew and I love this,” Maldonado said. “We’re not solely in this for the money, it’s something that we enjoy. We take this as an art form, more than an actual bakery.”

For more information visit www.8bitbakeshop.com or www.facebook.com/8bitbakeshop. To place an order email 8bitbakeshop@gmail.com.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Man wanted for public lewdness on Queens R train


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

A man fondled himself in front of a 47-year-old woman while aboard a Queens R train last week, police said.

The victim was on the train, which was near the Queens Plaza station in Long Island City, at about 5:40 p.m. on Jan. 23 when the incident occurred.

A man sitting on the train put his hands in his pants and started to fondle himself, cops said. He then got off the subway at the next stop.

Police describe the suspect as Hispanic, 5 feet 5 inches tall and 125 pounds.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Construction set to start on Hunters Point Community Library


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Renderings courtesy of the Queens Library

The Long Island City community celebrated Thursday morning the beginning of construction of a new waterfront library set to have the best view in Queens.

Local elected officials, community leaders, students from P.S./I.S. 78 and residents of the western Queens neighborhood came together for the start of the construction phase for the Hunters Point Community Library, which will be located at Center Boulevard and 48th Avenue, right next to Gantry Plaza State Park.

“This is an amazing historic day for Hunters Point, Long Island City,” said Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer, who helped secure $30 million to begin construction of the new branch. “For so many folks here who may have thought, ‘Is it really ever going to happen?’ today we are here to say it is, it’s happening, it’s real, this is a huge victory.”

The state-of-the-art library, set to break ground in the spring and be completed in 2017, was designed by architect Steven Holl.

THE COURIER/Photo by Angy Altamirano

THE COURIER/Photo by Angy Altamirano

“The great struggle of a neighborhood like this which has buildings going up by the day and thousands of people moving in, is making sure the infrastructure keeps up,” said state Senator Michael Gianaris, who provided $500,000 in state funding for the library. “To be able to say…we are going to have this landmark that people will look at from Manhattan and be jealous of is a testament to all the hard work that everyone has been doing.”

The 21,500-square-foot facility will feature a reading garden, rooftop terrace, reading rooms for all ages, a gallery, a performance space and a children’s area. It will overlook the Manhattan skyline across the East River.

“It will absolutely be the best view of any library in Queens. We are excited to see that start to rise and to know that we are providing a new library for this community that so desperately wants and needs it,” said Bridget Quinn-Carey, interim president and CEO of the Queens Library. “The library is in a great place for 2015 and beyond and projects like this really show how we can come together with our communities to provide what you need in a library.”

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Anthony Mazzarella, owner of The Waterfront Crabhouse in LIC, dies


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com


The owner of Long Island City’s Waterfront Crabhouse, Anthony Mazzarella, a boxing enthusiast and an avid fundraiser for people with cancer, died on Jan. 24. He was 77.

Mazzarella opened the eatery, located at 2-03 Borden Ave., almost 40 years ago. It is known for its seafood dishes and walls decorated with boxing memorabilia.

The LIC restaurant, housed in a building dating back to the 1800s, has made it through two disasters, each causing it to be closed for months. The first was a fire in 2009 and just two years ago the eatery was flooded by several feet of water after Hurricane Sandy hit the city.

Mazzarella was also a member of the New York State Boxing Commission and the NY State Wine and Grape Foundation. He served as a member of the American Cancer Society and Queens Division, and he founded the Patty Fund for Childhood Cancer.

He started an annual block party on the Fourth of July that raised thousands of dollars for cancer patients. Other events were held at the Crab House, all for the benefit of the American Cancer Society. Every year he would also host a Christmas party for kids with cancer.

“He was a terrific man who really cared about his community and his neighborhood,” said Joseph Conley, former chairman of Community Board 2. “His contributions were special, as he was instrumental in [Patty Fund for Childhood Cancer], just to name a few. He will be greatly missed.”

Mazzarella was honored with the American Cancer Society’s St. George Medal, the highest and most prestigious award for outstanding service and leadership in the fight against cancer.

Also, as a former boxer, Mazzarella started the Golden Mittens to use physical fitness as a way to keep children away from drugs.

He is survived by his wife, Deanne, three children, two grandchildren and his siblings.

Services will be held on Jan. 29 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 9 p.m. at the Pizzi Funeral House, located at 120 Paris Ave. in Northvale, N.J. A mass is scheduled for Jan. 30 at 11 a.m. at Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church at 120 Kings Highway in Tappan, in Rockland County.

In lieu of flowers, the family asks donations be made to the United Hospice of Rockland at 11 Stokum Lane, New City, NY 10956.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

18-story mixed-use residential tower planned for Long Island City


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Map courtesy of Google

Developer New York Lions Group is roaring again in Long Island City.

The Great Neck-based firm filed applications on Friday with the Department of Buildings to construct another tall, mixed-use residential building in the neighborhood.

The new tower will have 18 stories with 110 apartments as well as another 8,645 square feet for commercial tenants at 42-06 27th St., according to city records. There will also be 55 parking spaces in the development for future tenants.

It will be another collaboration between Lions Group and Flushing-based Raymond Chan Architect.

Also in Long Island City at 27-01 Jackson Ave., Lions Group plans to construct a 15-story mixed-use residential and commercial tower also designed by Raymond Chan. This project will have 88 apartments and about 7,000 square feet of commercial space.

Raymond Chan is also designing Lions Group’s 77-unit Astoria condo at 14-07 Broadway called The Baron, which is expected to be completed by September of 2016.

Finally, the Great Neck developer recently refiled plans to construct an eight-story condo with 15 apartments at 42-83 Hunter St. in Long Island City. The building will have 12,336 square feet of living space and is being designed by Flushing-based MY Architect PC.

RECOMMENDED STORIES 

Tech-based laundry, dry cleaning company to expand services into Queens


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Images courtesy of WashClub NYC

Having your laundry washed is about to get as easy as tapping on a smartphone for residents in Long Island City, Ridgewood and Maspeth.

WashClub NYC, a tech-based laundry and dry cleaning company offering on-demand pickup and delivery, has announced it plans to make its way to Queens within the first few months of 2015.

The Brooklyn-based company, which launched in 2010 and has since been operating in Manhattan and Brooklyn, also debuted a new app for Apple and Android users. Customers will be able to schedule, track and personalize the care of their laundry and dry cleaning through an “easy three-tap method.”

“We’re creating a path that is disrupting the way the laundry and dry cleaning industry operates,” said Rick Rome, president of WashClub NYC. “By releasing our app and entering select neighborhoods of Queens, we are going to reach more New York customers than ever before.”

The way WashClub NYC works is customers, either on the web or via the app, create an account and schedule a free pickup. They will then have to get the laundry ready to be picked up on the scheduled date and time.

Within 24 to 48 hours, customers will receive an email or text message notification about 30 minutes or less before the driver arrives. Delivery is free and people can choose what time works best for them. On the app, customers can also track via Google maps where the driver is and how close they are.

Services offered by WashClub NYC, which does all the cleaning in-house, include wash and fold, dry cleaning and tailoring. All first-time users receive 20 percent off and a free laundry bag.

“Our overall company goal is to be able to service all of New York City eventually,” Rome said. “It’s the most convenient and easiest way to do your laundry.”

Rome added that the reason services will start being offered in Long Island City, Ridgewood and Maspeth is because of their proximity to the Brooklyn facility.

However, he said in the future he plans to open a facility in Queens to be able to serve the entire borough.

“Queens is a very important and exciting next step for us. We think Queens is going to be an absolute fantastic market place,” Rome said. “Queens is a stepping stone to the next area.”

For more information or to set up an account, visit www.WashClubNYC.com or call 888-920-1370.

RECOMMENDED STORIES