Tag Archives: Little Neck Bay

See It: Live luxuriously by the bay in Douglaston Manor for $2.67M


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Douglas Elliman Real Estate/MLSLI

Douglaston may only be a half-hour train ride from the heart of Manhattan, but one mansion in the neighborhood on the market has the look and feel of a Mediterranean villa.

Currently offered by Douglas Elliman Real Estate, the mansion at 122 Grosvenor St. is described as “Tuscany meets New York,” a sprawling 1920s-style Mediterranean home featuring six bedrooms, 4 1/2 baths and more than 10,000 square feet of exterior space.

The home also has spacious views of Little Neck Bay and is within walking distance of both the Douglaston Country Club and Douglas Manor Dock. Listed at $2,670,000 with an annual real estate tax of $16,458, the mansion offers its future owner a North Shore experience with Queens taxes.

To learn more about the mansion and take a video tour of it, click here.


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Video: Teens rescued after becoming stranded on ice in Little Neck Bay


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Video YouTube/courtesy of Mary Marino

A venture onto a frozen Douglaston bay turned dangerous on Valentine’s Day when two teenagers got stuck on the cracking ice and had to be rescued by the fire department.

Ladder Company 164 and Engine Company 313 responded to the stranded pair around 5 p.m. Saturday, when they found them near Bay and 223rd streets about 300 to 400 feet from the Little Neck Bay shoreline, fire officials said.

When they arrived, FDNY members witnessed one of the teens, believed to be a boy, fall into the icy water and be pulled out by the other person.

Mary Marino, who lives right on the bay, saw the emergency vehicles and ran out to see what was happening.

“The water started rising up and the ice started cracking,” she said.

Marino then grabbed her phone and filmed the speedy rescue.


The teens, a boy and a girl, managed to make it closer to the shore, but were still stuck on the weakening ice, she said. The video shows the first responders placing a ladder across the ice so the two could crawl across it to shore, while some rescuers were in the water in insulated suits to hold the ladder steady.

“They did an excellent job — it was fast,” Marino, said, adding that the entire rescue took about 10 to 15 minutes.

One of the teenagers was taken to Long Island Jewish Medical Center for treatment due to exposure to the water.

Marino, who has lived near the bay for 40 years, said it’s very rare for someone to get stuck on the ice, but decided to post her video of the rescue online to make sure no one else gets stranded on the body of water again.

“You can’t walk on this ice because it’s dangerous,” Marino said.

“They didn’t realize the tide gets high,” she added.

Earlier this month, the FDNY and Parks Department held a press conference on the dangers of walking on frozen waters in city parks.

“This winter we have seen incidents in Central Park, in the Bronx and [on Saturday] in Queens where, if not for the quick response and brave work of FDNY members in frigid, icy waters, New Yorkers may have lost their lives,” said FDNY Commissioner Daniel Nigro in a statement. “Venturing onto the ice of New York City’s rivers and waterways is dangerous. I urge all New Yorkers to stay off the ice for their safety, and for the safety of all FDNY members who respond to these emergencies.”

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Body found floating near Bayside Marina


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Police pulled a man’s body from Little Neck Bay in Bayside yesterday.

The body was discovered floating near the Bayside Marina around 8:20 a.m., authorities said.

Cops responded to a call about the body and found the man, who appears to be in his 20’s, dead on arrival.

The medical examiner’s office is currently investigating the body to determine the cause of death, officials said.

The man’s identity had not been released as of Sunday.

 

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Community to city: Preserve Udalls Cove Park


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

Queens preservationists and a local community board want the city to save some of the last remaining parcels of Udalls Cove Park from development.

Several acres of privately owned wetlands and wooded uplands in the park’s ravine have come under new threat, according to Community Board 11 and the Udalls Cove Preservation Committee.

“This week we have learned that the owner of most of that land now seeks to sell it,” said Walter Mugdan, the committee’s president. “That means the threat of development within the park boundary has arisen once more.”

Advocates say the cove’s salt water marshes and freshwater wetlands are a sanctuary for wildlife in the city.

An inlet of Little Neck Bay between Douglaston and Great Neck, it is home to a variety of animals including salamanders, muskrats and the occasional fox, nearby residents said.

“It’s one of the last salt marshes in the city of New York at least on the north shore,” said CB 11 chair Jerry Iannece.

Neighbors of the city and state owned portion of Udalls Cove at Virginia Point said they fear development near the deep-wooded ravine will ultimately spread to other parts of the park.

“Everything is connected, like in nature,” said resident Chris DeGeorge. “Once one property is developed, it’s like Pandora’s box. I don’t want it to have a cascading effect.”

Mugdan and CB 11 sent letters to the mayor, calling for the city to buy five of the last remaining privately owned 15 parcels. The five connected lots total to about 1.4 acres.

“It just makes sense that we go out there and try to buy this property before a developer goes out there and puts houses on it,” Iannece said.

More than 80 percent of the ravine’s 14.25 acres has already been bought and saved from development since the 1980s, according to the groups.

Several acres were almost developed into 18 houses in 2004, Mugdan said, until the city bought and put the land into its Udalls Cove Wildlife Preserve.

The city’s Parks Department, which manages the preserve, said it wants to work with the community and its elected officials to complete the purchase of the rest of the property.

“Strengthening Udall’s Cove Park is a priority for the administration and we are exploring every possible means of preserving these parcels,” a department spokesperson said.

Supporters said Udalls Cove Park should remain a “unique” part of the borough.

“That separates us,” said DeGeorge, who likes to kayak in his backyard salt marshes. “When I have people over, they never believe this is Queens.”

The property owner did not return calls for comment as of press time.

“You need to preserve all of it to keep it in its pristine condition,” Iannece said, “and let nature do what nature does best.”

 

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What to do with the kids this weekend


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of the New York Hall of Science

QUEENS

Saturday, September 29

9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Join the Friends of the Ridgewood Library for their semi-annual Fun Day, where there be a flea market, crafts, reading in the garden and more.

11 a.m. – 3 p.m., The National Estuaries Day Festival commemorates Little Neck Bay, the local estuary. Meet people from health service, recreational and civic associations, school groups and government organizations. Hike along Alley Pond Environmental Center’s unique and beautiful estuary trails, listen to live music, visit educational booths and exhibits from neighborhood organizations and participate in children’s activities and crafts. Free entertainment, hands-on demonstrations, fun games, boat and canoe rides. Please pre-register.

5:30 – 8:30 p.m., At the Voelker Orth Museum’s Oktoberfest in the Garden there will be food, drinks, music and more in celebration of the German-American heritage of the Voelker and Orth families. Admission $30 ($25 for members), inclusive of food and drink. Reservations recommended.

Saturday, September 29 – Sunday, September 30

10 a.m. – 7 p.m. (Saturday, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. (Sunday), Deemed “The Greatest Show and Tell on Earth,” the annual Maker Faire at the New York Hall of Science will feature more than 500 maker exhibits, the world’s most diverse showcase of creativity and innovation in technology, craft, science, fashion, art, food and more. Expect outrageous attractions such as the Life-Sized Mousetrap, Coke Zero and Mentos Show, Power Racing Series, iconic Cupcake Cars and other spectacular surprises, such as workshops on soldering, lock picking and Arduino.

Sunday, September 30

12 p.m. – 6 p.m., The Forest Hills Street Festival is a family fair on seven blocks with about 150 vendors, promotions, kiddie rides and crafts. Plus, Austin Street stores will be open. Rain or shine.

4 p.m. – 6 p.m., The Autumn Moon Festival at the Queens Botanical Garden is an afternoon of moon cakes, arts and crafts, and cultural performances celebrating an ancient holiday that reflects on the summer harvest, the fullness of the moon and the myth of the immortal moon goddess. Bring picnic blankets and summer chairs. Free with admission.

 

AROUND QUEENS

Saturday, September 29

1 p.m., Ballet Long Island’s Princess Tea Party opens this weekend, featuring Cinderella, Snow White, Sleeping Beauty, The Little Mermaid and more. Kids can also take photos with the princess characters and join them for a tea party following the performance.

5:30 p.m. -6:30 p.m., Take part in the national attempt to break the Guinness World Record for the most soccer balls ever dribbled by a group at one time. The event also raises money and awareness for America SCORES, which help bring soccer to under-resourced elementary schools. The New York City event will take place at Pier 25 (at Hudson River Greenway and North Moore) and will be followed by a happy hour fundraiser at Harry’s Italian Pizza Bar in Battery Park City.

Saturday, September 29 – Sunday, September 30

11 a.m., 1 p.m., 3 p.m., Come to the Long Island Children’s Museum this weekend to see Dora the Explorer Live! “Dora’s Pirate Adventure.”

Sunday, September 30

12:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m., Kiddie Cruise: A Princess and Pirate Adventure is an all inclusive fun-filled family event that sails for two hours on the Hudson River. Guests enjoy a puppet show, magician, face painting, arts and crafts, live music while soaking in the sights. All guests receive a healthy bagged lunch and unlimited juice and soda. Kids are encouraged to dress up as their favorite Princess or Pirate. The boat leaves from Pier #40 West Side Highway in Manhattan.

 

 

 

Community Board 11: Potential ferry good, just not here


| mchan@queenscourier.com

The city’s plans to push for ferry piers in metro waterfronts would not sail well with a local community board if the Bayside Marina is chosen as a landing site.

Community Board 11 voiced concerns against the Department of City Planning’s (DCP) proposed revisions to its Waterfront Revitalization Program (WRP), which includes plans to install ferry landings throughout the five boroughs.

District Manager Susan Seinfeld said the community board supports the citywide initiative for mass waterfront transportation, but felt the potential location of a ferry terminal at the Bayside Marina would have a negative impact on residents directly across the marina, as well as Little Neck Bay.

“This is all hypothetical because no one said there would be a ferry there,” Seinfeld said. “What [the community board] is saying is that if there was a proposal for a ferry there, that would be a problem.”

Seinfeld said Little Neck Bay waters are too shallow for ferries to safely travel through. There is also no place for vehicles to park at the Bayside Marina, she said.

“[The community board] did not believe that it was a logical place should anyone propose it,” Seinfeld said.

A DCP spokesperson said there is no ferry proposal for Little Neck Bay.

The WRP is the city’s key coastal zone management tool, establishing the city’s policies for development and waterfront use. A new, comprehensive waterfront plan was reissued by the DCP in early 2011 to lay out a 10 year blueprint of the future of the city’s waterfront, which includes creating and mapping a new designation to be called the “Priority Marine Activity Zone” to promote waterborne transportation such as piers for ferry landings.

Community Boards 2 and 8 voted to approve the proposed revisions during a June 28 public hearing held by Borough President Helen Marshall.