Tag Archives: Little League

Bayside Little League drops Borough Cup final at Yankee Stadium


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy Steven Perez

The Bayside Rebels Little League team came up short of standing on top of the city, but they will have a summer vacation story like none other to tell their schoolmates.

The Rebels suffered a 6-2 defeat in the inaugural 12U Borough Cup Championship at Yankee Stadium on Aug. 14 to the USC Knights. But prior to the game, the team took a tour of Monument Park and learned about baseball legends.

Then they met with and received autographs from famous sports figures, including former Yankees infielder Willie Randolph, former Mets pitcher John Franco and Yankees pitcher CC Sabathia.

Photo courtesy Steven Perez

Photo courtesy of Steven Perez

After the pre-game activities, the Rebels had a difficult time against the Knights.

They allowed three runs in the first inning and one more in the second. It was enough to knock out Bayside, which struggled at the plate during the game.

The Rebels had just four hits, two of which came from Nicholas Perez, who also scored the first run for the team in the fourth inning.

John Callahan scored another run for the Rebels in the fourth inning, but it was all the offense the Bayside team would get. The Knights meanwhile added two more insurance runs in the fifth and seventh innings to win the game.

 

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Whitestone defeats Bayside in Nick Lomangino championship title game


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

Getting thrown out of a championship game wasn’t part of the strategy, but after Whitestone Renegades baseball team coaches were tossed in the top of the fifth inning from the Nick Lomangino Tournament final, the team seemed to have new energy.

Two assistant coaches got tossed from the game on Monday after arguing a call with the umpire that favored the opposing Bayside Bulldogs.

The Whitestone team gave up its lead early in the inning thanks to the call, but after the ejections, starting pitcher Lino Gagliano struck out the side to end the Bayside rally.

And when it was their turn to bat, the Renegades scored two runs to get a 5-3 lead, which they protected for the victory. Gagliano notched 14 strikeouts on 116 pitches for a complete game win.

“They tied up the score, but we came back,” Whitestone Renegades manager John Cirillo said. “The next inning we came right back at them.”

The Renegades, who play out of the Dwarf-Giraffe Athletic League, used timely hitting to break the 3-3 tie in the bottom of the fifth inning.

Third baseman Angelo Alessandro, who finished the game 3-for-3, smacked a double to the fence to get things going.

Then Gagliano brought him home with a single. The following batter, catcher Nick Ellerby, then smacked a double to send Gagliano home.

With the renewed 5-3 lead, Gagliano got back on the mound for the two remaining innings and looked like a machine. He struck out the final six batters — without allowing a hit — to win the championship.

“Once you got the lead in the sixth and the seventh inning, it becomes who is going to fight harder, and we did,” Cirillo said. “We fought like a team.”

 

 

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Bayside Rebels Little League team heading to Borough Cup


| editorial@queenscourier.com

Yankee Stadium here we come!

BENJAMIN FANG

The Bayside Rebels are back and better than ever.

After an administrative error left the Little League baseball team out of the sectional tournament, the 12-year-olds are now headed to the Borough Cup championship game on Aug. 14 at Yankee Stadium.

They will face the USC Knights of Kingsbridge in a matchup pitting Queens against the Bronx.

Bayside’s road to the finals was paved with success. The Rebels dominated all five tournament games, outscoring opponents 41 to two.

The Rebels blanked three straight Queens teams to advance to the city playoffs. They beat the Forest Hill Bombers 7-0, defeated the NY Nationals 7-0 and trounced the Queens Braves 12-0.

In the next round, Bayside handed the Bronx’s TM Select team a 9-1 loss, leading them to the semifinal game against Staten Island’s Mid-Island Royals. On Sunday, the Queens champions easily beat the Royals 6-1, moving on to the championship game.

Now they will face a formidable foe in the USC Knights, which have also overpowered its competitors. The Bronx team has scored 55 runs throughout the Borough Cup tournament while only surrendering four.

This is the inaugural Borough Cup tournament, created by Mets Hall of Fame pitcher John Franco, WFAN sports radio personality Craig Carton and Brooklyn Cyclones assistant general manager Gary Perone.

 

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Ozone Howard Little Leaguer is a giant among his peers


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

Chris Kollmer is colossal.

Kollmer is so tall and powerful for his age that Ozone Howard Little League Huskies eight and under manager Andy Menechella often carries the young player’s birth certificate to prove to opposing teams’ parents the nine-year-old is not a teenager.

Standing at 5’1”, about 120 pounds and wearing size nine shoe, Kollmer is a giant among his peers. And it’s not just his size that makes him frightening. Kollmer is a monster at the plate.

“In a situation where the game is tight, you don’t want anybody else but him at the plate,” Menechella said. “He’s hit homeruns over the fence that I haven’t seen 13 year olds hit.”

In 40 games he has 54 hits with a remarkable .574, 10 homeruns and 67 RBIs. It’s no doubt Kollmer is a major factor why the Huskies have gone 40-9 this summer, and won two tournaments after making four finals.

Teams are so scared of Kollmer that they’ve begun to intentionally walk him to first base to avoid giving up a homer. This tactic is frequently used against big name sluggers in the Major League, but it just frustrates Kollmer.

“If they intentionally walk me I get mad, because I really want to hit the ball,” Kollmer said.

Kollmer isn’t just a baseball player. He is a versatile athlete that plays basketball and football when he’s not on the diamond, and even in those sports his size is recognized. In basketball he plays center, usually reserved for the tallest player, and in football, he plays fullback, which is known for the big-bodied defensive guys.

But Kollmer wasn’t always good at baseball. His physical growth certainly helped boost is athletic ability, and his parents said help from a new coach also spurted his little league baseball domination.

Elvin Millan, a catcher for the Newark Bears of the Canadian American Association of Professional Baseball, has been working with Kollmer to help improve his swing and give him tips on how to play the first base and catcher positions. When Millan first met Kollmer he knew the little leaguer had the natural ability to be great, but needed to refine his technique.

“He had the talent,” Millan said. “He was like a newborn giraffe.”

The talent isn’t just random. Kollmer comes from a sports-oriented family. His father, Darren, played lacrosse growing up, his brother is a college baseball player and his cousins all play football and baseball.

“I think it’s just genetics,” Darren said.

But besides his attributes on the field, Kollmer is a normal kid. He likes playing video games, watching cartoons, eating spaghetti and meatballs and studying mathematics. His favorite baseball team is the Yankees; he admires the captain, Derek Jeter, and of course he dreams of playing baseball professionally in the distant future.

For now though, Kollmer has his eyes set on a much closer reality. Within the next couple of years he wants to lead his team to the Little League World Series.

“My team can definitely get there, we are an excellent team,” Kollmer said.

 

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Ozone Howard Little League eight and under team wins tournament


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy Andy Menechella

The Ozone Howard Little League eight and under team defeated Oceanside National Little League, 7-5, in a tournament hosted by Oceanside on July 25, after an explosive comeback effort.

Trailing Oceanside in the 4th inning, Ozone Howard’s Chris Kollmer cleared the bases with a two-out double to take the lead. Following the comeback, John Sapia entered in relief for Ozone Howard and shutout Oceanside for the final three innings for the win.

The victory capped a six-game undefeated streak in the tournament.

“This was a thrilling victory for this Ozone Howard Huskies team,” said manager Andy Menechella. “This team has the heart of a lion. I’m so proud of these guys and I am thrilled to see what’s to come next for this team.”

 

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Kids learn from the greats of baseball


| editorial@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Anthony O'Reilly

BY ANTHONY O’REILLY

The next generation of baseball players had the opportunity to be trained by the greats of yesteryear at a Youth Baseball Clinic held at St. Kevin’s School in Flushing.

Yankee greats Roy White, Oscar Gamble and Gamble’s son Sean, a former Phillies player and current coach at Selma University in Alabama, all participated in the event. The youngsters were able to receive tips on batting, pitching and throwing from the former players.

Queens legend Dwight “Doc” Gooden, a part of the 1986 Mets championship team, also came out to the event.

This was the third time the clinic was held, according to the Catholic Youth Organization’s (CYO) baseball director for St. Kevin’s, John Bonnano.

Bonnano, who played Little League himself as a kid, said he started the clinic to allow the youngsters to have a memory about baseball, beyond just playing on the field.

“It’s something for them to remember as they grow up as well as have fun and learn some things,” he said.

 

Bonanno said last year the clinic was held out on Long Island, which caused low attendance because of the commute. This year, the clinic returned to the school’s basketball court.

Bonnano said he’s good friends with Gamble, which allowed him to host the clinic at a minimal cost.

Gamble said he felt it important to attend such clinics because it allowed the next generation of baseball players to get a head start in honing their skills.

“We try to teach a lot of the technique,” he said. “It’s great to get our and help the kids. It’s a lot of fun.”

White said that while he was eager to help the young players develop their skills, he pointed out that it’s hard to teach them everything they need to know at this point of the game.

“You can do some basic things,” he said. “But you can’t start getting too technical with them.”

White also said he wanted to show up in order to give the kids something to remember their baseball playing days by.

“I never had anyone from baseball come in when I was in school,” he said.

Kevin Hynes has two kids at St. Kevin’s, both of whom play baseball. For him, attending the clinic with his kids was common sense.

“They’re very active in the St. Kevin’s community,” he said. “So this was the next logical step.”

Hynes said while he teaches his kids the fundamentals of baseball, he still felt it important to bring them to the clinic and learn from the greats.

“Even though we’re Queens Mets fans, it’s still great for them to show them how to play the game and just have fun.”

Kids and their parents were also given the opportunity to take pictures with and receive autographs from the players. Many parents brought along posters and memorabilia from the players during their heyday, something that White says is a common occurrence at clinics such as these.

“A lot of people will come up to me and say, ‘I used to copy your stance when I was playing,’” said White.

Bonnano said he will try to continue the tradition of the youth clinic every year, hoping that it attracts more and more young baseball hopefuls.

 

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Ozone Howard all-star team wins tournament


| editorial@queenscourier.com

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Team Wolfpack, the Ozone Howard Little League’s eight-year-old all-star team, won the championship in the “2012 SYAG Ed Rall Memorial Tournament” with an exciting finish.

The Ed Rall Tournament is Long Island’s most elite youth baseball tournament, with over 140 teams in attendance. It began in memory of firefighter and longtime SYAG coach Edward Rall. He was an 18-year veteran of the FDNY as a member of Rescue 2, who paid the supreme sacrifice on September 11, 2001.

The Wolfpack had to play a triple header to win the tournament because of a rainout.

The Wolfpack went down quickly in the championship game 4-1 with some big hits from their counterparts, the Long Island Falcons. But then the top of the 6th inning came and with two outs, the Wolfpack came howling back, with big hits from Michael McNally, Devin Rivero, Dylan Wayne, Nicky Gatto, Marco Jannis and Brandon Ricca, to score four runs and take the lead. Starting pitcher Brandon Ricca finished the game by shutting the door in the bottom of the sixth inning — with the whole complex going wild.

Former Queens Little League ‘coach of the year’ pleads guilty to sexually abusing minors


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy of Ellis Kaplan

A former Little League coach of the year pleaded guilty to sexually abusing players on his team.

David Hartshorn, a former coach at the Rochdale Village Little League, was arrested and charged in February with having sexual contact with three boys, ages 13 and 14, at his Rochdale Village home between July 2009 and January 2011. He was also accused of showing child pornography to minors and filming two teens engaged in sex acts.

Hartshorn pleaded guilty to one count of first-degree criminal sexual act, two counts of second-degree criminal sexual act and two counts of use of a child in a sexual performance. Queens Supreme Court Justice Richard L. Buchter indicated Hartshorn would be sentenced to 18 years in prison, the district attorney’s office said.

“The defendant has admitted being a sexual predator who took advantage of his position as a Little League baseball coach to get close to young boys before sexually abusing them,” said District Attorney Richard Brown. “The consequences of his actions can have a lasting and profound impact on his victims – for that reason alone, the intended prison sentence to be meted out by the Court is more than warranted.”

According to the criminal charges, Hartshorn would frequently have members of his team at his residence.

This isn’t Hartshorn’s first time in trouble with the law. According to published reports, he was convicted in 1989 on charges of sodomy, promoting sexual performance by a child under 16 and promoting obscene sexual performance by a child under 16.

Hartshorn has been held without bail since his February 2011 arrest.

Additional reporting by Steve Mosco