Tag Archives: library

New modern library opens in Glen Oaks this May


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Queens Public Library

Glen Oaks is getting a sleek new library that opens in the third week of May, officials said.

The $17 million facility at 256-04 Union Turnpike is 18,000 square feet­­—nearly double the size of the neighborhood’s temporary library at 255-01 Union Turnpike. The new, three-story building will have more customer service features including computer workstations, an outdoor reading space and separate areas for adults, teens and children.

The library will also have a sweeping interior staircase, a sky-lit reading lounge and a partial glass exterior.

As construction wraps up, the temporary branch will close on May 3, officials said.

Bookworms can visit nearby libraries in Bellerose or Windsor Park until the grand opening. Materials can be renewed online at www.queenslibrary.org or by phone at 718-990-8508.

 

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Suspect nabbed in library assault


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

Screenshot/Video courtesy of NYPD

A suspect wanted in connection with the March 4 assault on a 15-year-old girl at a Queens library has been arrested, police said.

Hector Troche, 56, has been charged with sexual abuse, forcible touching and public lewdness after police say he grabbed the teen and exposed himself to her.

 

Bayside Library to close for renovations


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Bayside bookworms will soon have to get their literary fixes elsewhere.

The Bayside branch of the Queens Library, located at 214-20 Northern Boulevard, will close on December 29 to begin its $1.3 million renovation project, officials said.

The complete interior makeover, funded by city and borough leaders, includes the installation of a new self-service check-out station, separate areas for adults, teens and children, full handicap accessibility, and a “bright new décor” at the 10,300 square-foot public library, said library officials.

It is expected to reopen in the summer of 2013.

A mobile library will provide limited service at the front of the Bayside branch during construction. Hours of service are available at www.queenslibrary.org.

Book lovers, in the interim, can also visit nearby branches, including East Flushing at 196-36 Northern Boulevard, Douglaston/Little Neck at 249-01 Northern Boulevard, and Bay Terrace at 18-36 Bell Boulevard.

Hunters Point library site dedicated


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

Interior_Cyber_center

Hunters Point bookworms can soon curl up with a good read just inches from home.

Queens Library announced plans to construct a new branch at the corner of Center Boulevard and 48th Avenue in Hunters Point. The 21,500-square-foot facility, built on the banks of the East River, will feature a cyber-center, roof terrace and communal garden as well as separate reading spaces for adults, teens and children. According to Queens Library spokesperson Joanne King, the building will place an emphasis on environmental preservation, implementing ecologically-sound features to create an entirely carbon neutral structure.

Library officials expect to feature free cultural events and educational programs at the facility.

The building — priced at $28.6 million — was designed by world-famous architect Steven Holl, who specializes in environmentally efficient buildings.

The neighborhood lobbied strongly for the library, tired of trekking to their closest facility at the Court Square branch. King said residents felt they deserved a communal place to gather, share ideas and relax.

“They’re going to have a community hub,” said King. “It’s going to be an anchor of education and culture in the community — a community space where people can just relax and be. It will be recognizable from across the river and in the community so it’s going to give some status to the community itself by having this iconic building there as well as all the services a library provides.”

The waterfront site was dedicated at a ceremony on Friday, October 5 with the help of Borough President Helen Marshall and Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer. Students from P.S. 78 planted “trees of knowledge” during the Friday morning ceremony.

Dr. Don Dodelson, president of the group Friends of Hunters Point Library, was ecstatic that his outfit’s hard work had paid off.

“It feels wonderful that the library is actually going to be and dedicating the ground is a huge step forward,” said Dodelson.

Dodelson hopes the library will become an all-encompassing community center, housing performances and gallery showcases as well as ceremonies such as weddings and recitals.

Elmhurst, East Elmhurst libraries to become ‘destinations’


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Rendering courtesy of the Queens Library

The Queens Library has turned the page on an era of basic brick buildings, beginning a new chapter of attractive edifices acting as neighborhood landmarks.

During the fiscal crisis of the 1970s many libraries were “cinder block and institutional and really not aesthetically pleasing or a welcoming community space to be in,” said Joanne King, associate director of communications at the Queens Library. The Elmhurst and East Elmhurst branches serve as two examples of the shift to transform the libraries into community destinations.

“We want the community to feel welcome, so a lot of the buildings as they’re renovated are being renovated with the exterior walls at least partly transparent so it integrates more with the community and the community can see what’s going on inside the library,” she said.

The Elmhurst Library, which is being rebuilt, was originally constructed in 1906 with funding from philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, though it underwent numerous expansions and renovations.

“It’s going to be integrated into the community and the colors are vibrant; it’s not some large beige building with no personality,” King said.

Hours before the foundation was completed on the Elmhurst branch on July 25, Garrison Architects was receiving an Excellence in Design award for the addition to the East Elmhurst Library.

The award is given to exceptional public projects that exemplify the highest standards of design.

Jim Garrison, the firm’s owner, said in the past, libraries “tended to want to shutter themselves as opposed to open themselves up.”

Saying the design award meant a lot, he added: “That’s a big part of the agenda, making libraries an accessible part of our public world.”

The 30,000-square-foot Elmhurst Library is scheduled to open in 2014. The addition to the East Elmhurst branch does not yet have a completion date.

 

Despite 5 years of cuts, Queens Library retained all service hours and jobs


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Despite five consecutive years of budget cuts that eliminated more than $16 million in operating expenses, the Queens Library will begin a new chapter — with all jobs and service hours retained.

“Given the staggering cuts we were facing, to not have one library close, not one library reduce its hours, to keep libraries where they’re at, was a tremendous victory,” said Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer, who chairs the City Council’s committee on libraries.

The libraries’ budget was threatened with $26 million in reductions, which would have forced 18 of the borough’s 62 institutions to shut their doors. Thirty more would have had to close at least four days a week.

Rallies were held throughout the borough to prevent the city from closing the book on Queens libraries.

“We’re very, very grateful the council kept the libraries a priority,” said Joanne King, associate director of communications for the Queens Library. “We will stay open in every community and everyone in Queens should be very grateful for that.”

Six hundred staffers’ jobs were also saved with the restoration.

“I heard when [the budget] was announced there were workers literally in tears knowing their jobs had been saved,” said Van Bramer, who worked for the Queens Library before being elected. “That’s something I’m really proud of, that we saved jobs.”

Though the “doomsday budget” did not pass, the library still had $1.8 million slashed for this fiscal year, which began on July 1. The ongoing hiring freeze will also reduce staff. The library employs about 200 fewer staffers than four years ago.

Less staff means the library needs to get creative so no service is affected, King said.

To prevent further cuts, Van Bramer said libraries’ budgets can’t be radically reduced in early financial plans. Steep cuts to the preliminary and executive budget make restoring all the money more difficult and puts “libraries’ backs against the wall,” the councilmember said.

“We have to not start so far behind,” said Van Bramer, who added the council will look to restore funds as the economy improves. “What we’re going to need to do under a new mayor is not cut libraries to the bone in the preliminary budget.”

Balanced budget saves child care, libraries and fire companies


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of the mayor's office

Without raising the tax bar, education, child care, libraries and other city services will be spared – despite original concerns of heavy cuts – in the 2013 Fiscal Year budget, city officials announced Monday, June 25 attributing the balanced budget to several cost-saving methods.

“When times were better, the city set aside surplus revenue — and when the first storm clouds gathered in 2007, we began cutting budgets,” said Mayor Michael Bloomberg. “These actions — and our work over the past decade to diversify the economy and make it less reliant on Wall Street — have allowed us avoid the severe service cuts that many other cities are facing.”

About $150 million will be added from the mayor’s May Executive Budget, which proposed a large child care cut, to the Administration for Children’s Services Child Care Program and the Department of Youth and Community Development Out-of-School Time program, ensuring child care stays well-funded in the City.

The funding is a major accomplishment for child care, said Gregory Brender, policy advisor for United Neighborhood Houses.

“It’s a big victory for child care,” he said. “Losing spots was terrifying to parents around the city.”

In addition, roughly 1,000 teachers will be added, it was announced, and several hundred teacher’s aide jobs will be spared.

Because of about $90 million going toward the library system, more than 600 Queens Library jobs will be saved, according to a statement from the Library. There will also be no cuts to hours, but there will be limited reductions to services, said Joanne King, Queens Library associate director of communications.

“Our advocates in City Hall have kept libraries a priority through the last several budgets,” she said. “We know the people of Queens will be very appreciative.”

Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley, who chairs the Fire and Criminal Justice Committee, said the twenty fire houses saved from elimination was a relief to New Yorkers and they would continue to keep the city safe.

“We can all rest assured knowing that the people of the city of New York will be safe,” Crowley said. “Closing even one fire company would have reduced response times and people’s lives would have hung in the balance. So for me today it’s gratifying to know that’s one less worry.”

Although the budget is balanced and ahead of the June 30 deadline, the Mayor’s office acknowledged there will be a $2.5 billion budget gap for the 2014 fiscal year.

“We face a significant challenge again next year, but given the effective and fiscally responsible partnership we’ve had with the Council – and the leadership we know we can rely on from Speaker Christine Quinn – I’m confident we’ll meet any challenges that arise,” Bloomberg said.

Additional reporting by Billy Rennison

Mayor announces balanced budget; fire companies, libraries and child care saved


| brennison@queenscourier.com

With severe cuts to fire companies, child care and libraries looming, an on-time, balanced city budget was agreed upon with all services restored, the mayor announced.

“We produced an on-time, balanced budget that does not raise taxes and preserves central services we all rely on,” said Mayor Michael Bloomberg at the press conference announcing the budget on Monday, June 25.

An agreement between the city council and mayor on the budget came well ahead of the June 30 deadline.

Council speaker Christine Quinn said the approximately $68.5 billion budget was “a statement of priorities.”

Twenty fire companies and more than 40,000 day care and after-school spots faced elimination in the preliminary budget. More than $26 million was scheduled to be cut from the library’s budget which would have forced 18 libraries in Queens to shut their doors.

Bloomberg said he was sure the final budget would have all the cuts restored.

“We’ve done it every year,” he said.

While the cuts were restored this time, it may be harder in next year’s budget, the mayor said. The 2014 fiscal year faces a $2.5 billion budget gap.

 

 

Officials break ground on new Adult Learning Center in Rochdale Village


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Photo by Dominick Totino Photography

Brainy bookworms in Rochdale Village will soon have a $4.1 million new home away from home.

According to Queens Library officials, the community’s Adult Learning Center will be doubled in size to include more classroom and discussion group space, additional computers, listening stations and a new handicapped-accessible restroom.

“The expanded Adult Learning Center at Rochdale Village is a solid investment in the future,” said Borough President Helen Marshall, who provided $500,000 in funding. “When finished, it will be a practical resource for users who want to explore the programs and services it offers to enhance opportunities and career paths in a comfortable, up-to-date modern facility.”

Additional funds were allocated by Assemblymember Vivian Cook and Councilmember Ruben Wills, who joined Marshall and library officials on March 9 during the project’s groundbreaking and ceremonially kick-off.

According to library officials, the adult learning center — which is one of seven in the Queens Library system — serves hundreds of adult students every year, helping them to learn how to read, write and converse in English. The center also helps prepare students for pre-GED classes.

“The Adult Learning Center is vital to the adults in our community,” Cook said. “This expansion is great news for the residents of southeast Queens.”

The new center will be built on the vacant city-owned property adjacent to the library, officials said. Among other renovations, officials said, the roof, indoor ventilation systems and fire protection equipment will be replaced and self-service check-in technology will be installed.

Construction is expected to conclude in the fall of 2013.

Meanwhile, officials said,  will continue its normal operations, and the Adult Learning Center will hold its sessions at the Rochdale Village and Laurelton Libraries in the interim.

Teen’s Alleged Assaulter Pretended To Be A Police Officer


| jlane@queenscourier.com

Graphic by Jay Lane

Teen’s Alleged Assaulter Pretended To Be A Police Officer

Police were searching late Tuesday for a man who allegedly pretended to be a police officer and sexually assaulted a teenage boy he met in a subway station in Sunset Park, Brooklyn last week. Investigators say the man approached a 15-year-old boy at the 53rd Street and Fourth Avenue station around 9:30 a.m. Friday, after the teen threw an empty bag of potato chips on the ground. Authorities said the teen claimed the man displayed what looked like a police shield and told the boy to get into his white van. They say the suspect drove to 92nd Street and Dahlgren Place in Bay Ridge, where he sexually assaulted the boy. Read More: NY1

The mistakes that took 5 lives

Two fatal mistakes may have cost the lives of the three little girls and their grandparents who died Christmas morning when a century-old Victorian mansion went up in flames and turned into a death trap. Fire marshals in Stamford, Connecticut, said the owner’s boyfriend, contractor Michael Borcino, put still-smoldering embers from a yule log into some kind of a bag — and then left it leaning against an outside rear wall of the $1.7 million house. The marshals said the embers had not been doused with water. On the other side of the wall was a mud room. Read More: New York Post

Flushing neighborhood mourns closing of Palace Diner, a local mainstay since 1976

The Palace Diner, a Flushing mainstay that served as a cozy gathering place for local residents and politicians alike, is shutting its doors for good on Friday. “I’ve had a good run, it’s time,” said owner George Mantzikos. “I’ve been fortunate to have good customers and good employees.” The diner, known for its Greek specialties, fresh fish and chops, will be replaced by an “upscale Chinese restaurant,” he said. Read More: Daily News

Ozone Park unites for fallen officer Peter Figoski

In light of the fact that four of the five men nabbed as suspects in the tragic, shooting death of fallen officer Peter Figoski are from Ozone Park, elected officials and residents of the community banded together to raise money and spirits for Figoski’s family. “We wanted to do something in this community to show that those criminals are not a reflection of the people in this neighborhood. There are good, solid people in this community,” said Matt Turner of the Make a Difference Christmas Effort. The Make a Difference Christmas Effort — which hosted a benefit on December 22 at St. Mary Gate of Heaven School — raised $5,000 for the wife and four daughters Figoski leaves behind. Read More: Queens Courier

Rent-stabilized Jamaica tenants sue landlord;  they say he boosted rents to force  them out  

More than 40 longtime Jamaica tenants are suing their landlord for charging them large lump sums for building improvements they claim were never adequately made, in an effort to force them out of their homes. Residents of 90-36 149th Street, which is owned by Zara Realty Holding Corp., said their rent shot up thousands of dollars this year after the state approved a hike for rent-stabilized tenants. It was granted because Zara claimed to have installed a new roof and repaired the building’s brick exterior. But landlords are only allowed to raise rents 6 percent annually for rent-stabilized tenants, according to the tenants’ lawyers — not ask for one bulk payment. Read More: Daily News

Group wants to preserve ‘historic’ Elmhurst library

Over 106 years, some structures become staples of their communities. This is the sentiment one Elmhurst civic association has expressed regarding the neighborhood’s historic library, which is set to be torn down and replaced with a larger, more modern facility. Members of the Newtown Civic Association are puzzled by Queens Library’s decision to destroy the community “landmark,” which opened in 1906 and is one of the last remaining libraries built with funding from philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. Read More: Queens Courier

Archbishop Molloy gets 21st Century library


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Photos by Joseph Sommo

Books and bookworms alike at Archbishop Molloy High School now have a new place to call home.

Students and faculty at the Briarwood school welcomed a brand new, state-of-the-art library in September at the start of the school year.

“It’s fantastic. It is light-years ahead of what it used to be,” said alumnus Joseph Sommo, who is also the school’s alumni communications coordinator.

In order to accommodate the increased technological demands and advances, the former library — which was first erected over 50 years ago when the school was constructed in 1957 — was stripped down and rebuilt inside and out.

“Education is constantly changing and evolving. We need to keep up with the pace,” Sommo said. “This is something that had to be done, and everybody is thankful for it. It needed to be rebuilt. It wasn’t up to the times. The infrastructure was old, and it hasn’t been updated since the school was built. It needed the technological upgrades.”

The school’s newly-modernized William J. Murphy Library features an expansive research lab that boasts 40 laptop computers dedicated to online research, which is supported by more than one linear mile of cable implanted during construction. New additions also include a unique college preparatory center and a multimedia conference room that serves both faculty and students.

In addition, energy-efficient lighting, climate control, carpeting with new wood-crafted furniture and a library database — which serves as a more efficient, green solution in maintaining records — were also installed during the transformation.

“It’s been 50 years since we did major renovations in the library,” said Richard Karsten, the school’s president. The new library is a state-of-the-art solution for the next 25 years. It’s a clean, safe and well-lit environment for students to work in.”

The “ambitious” project was completed over the course of “one short summer,” Karsten said, adding that the “effective execution” came after one year of planning. The renovation broke ground in late May this year after classes ended and was completed before the first bell of the semester rang.

“It was old fashioned to say the least,” Sommo said. “It’s a lot more welcoming and inviting than before. There are a lot more students in there now, trust me. A lot of them used to go down to the lounge. The library is a place that everyone gravitates toward now. It’s cozy and it’s a good place to get your work done. It’s definitely received an update that is worthy of the school, its students and faculty.”

Queens’ Morning Roundup – 11/1/2011: Queens Library’s busy Elmhurst branch set to be torn down


| jlane@queenscourier.com

The Round Up
Queens Library’s busy Elmhurst branch set to be torn  down to make way for new state -of-the-art-facility 

The Queens Library’s second busiest branch is being torn down to make way for a new state-of-the-art facility. The Elmhurst Library, which hosted almost half a million visitors during the last fiscal year, will close on Nov. 7. And even though visitors will have to contend with a makeshift library of modular units for more two years, they say it’s worth the wait. Read More: Daily News

 

 

Attacks on NYC subway workers up 16% this year,  mirroring assaults on bus drivers

It’s not just bus drivers who are getting assaulted more frequently – attacks on subway workers also are up this year, officials said Monday. Assaults on conductors, cleaners and other subway staffers are up nearly 16% January through October compared to the same stretch last year, MTA officials said at a joint meeting of the City Council transportation and labor committees.  Councilman Eric Ulrich (R-Queens) urged the MTA to ask the NYPD to target the most troublesome bus routes with uniformed and undercover police officers. Read More: Daily News

 

NYPD combats bullying

The New York Police Department (NYPD) is aiming to take the fight out of bullies.
Officers of the NYPD Community Outreach Division joined Assemblymember Andrew Hevesi at P.S. 144 in Forest Hills on October 24 to present a police program designed to combat bullying in schools across the city. “Bullying is a real problem, and it can’t be ignored,” said Hevesi. “The NYPD did an outstanding job engaging the students in a discussion about bullying. The officers related to the students as they performed, and made them feel the emotional consequences of bullying.” Read More: Queens Courier

 

Richmond Hill Block Association gives residents a fighting chance against attack

Richmond Hill residents now have a fighting chance against sexual predators who have been terrorizing women in southeast Queens. In light of the recent patterns of sexual attacks in the surrounding areas, Sensei Ricky Singh of Dojo Warriors equipped a little more than a dozen women and men with vital keys to self-defense at the Richmond Hill Block Association’s monthly meeting on October 26. Of the countless sexual attacks in Queens, a 44-year-old female was assaulted on September 22 while she entered her home in Queens Village. Read More: Queens Courier

 

Downed Trees, Outages Remain After Weekend Snowstorm

New Yorkers were still feeling on Monday the effects of Saturday’s snow storm. Consolidated Edison said hundreds of city customers remained without power, and most of them were in the Bronx.The utility company said the delayed restoring of power is due to the extent of the damage from downed trees and wires in the borough. Meanwhile, tree cleanup was underway in all of the city’s parks on Monday. Read More: NY1

 

Mets To Alter Citi Field Walls To Try To Increase Scoring

The New York Mets are taking action to increase scoring at their home park, by bringing in and lowering the walls at Citi Field, hoping to turn a pitchers’ park into a neutral one. The new dimensions will add roughly 140 seats to the stadium, including 100 field-level seats in left field. A new left field wall will be about four feet closer to the plate, and the fence in left-center field will be brought 12 feet closer. Read More: NY1

Queens’ Morning Roundup – 10/20/2011: Suspected groper released from custody


| jlane@queenscourier.com

The Round Up

Former JetBlue flight attendant sentenced to one year of probation

A fed-up flight attendant whose spectacular exit down an emergency chute made him a national sensation completed his court-ordered treatment program Wednesday and was sentenced to a year of probation. Steven Slater avoided jail time for his stunt when he pleaded guilty to attempted criminal mischief and agreed to undergo counseling and substance abuse treatment. Read More: CBS News

 

Suspected groper released from custody

Police arrested Joshua Flecha, of Queens, on charges of forcible touching and sexual abuse. Flecha was picked out of a lineup in connection with the May 7 incident, but authorities say the woman could not say for certain he was the suspect and police released him Wednesday. Read More: Wall Street Journal

 

Ex-George Washington Bridge employee pleads guilty to toll theft

A former toll collector at the George Washington Bridge admitted Wednesday that she stole $500 in toll funds to support her prescription-drug abuse. Debbie Rembert, 41, of Queens,  admitted in court that she partly concealed the thefts by falsely reporting that trucks passed through her tollbooth but then turned around and did not cross the bridge or pay the toll. Read More: NJ.gov

 

 

Councilmember Van Bramer Announces Plans To Improve Queens Libraries

City Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer announced at the Queens Library of Woodside on Wednesday his plans to fund library improvements, including a teen center, in the 26th District. Watch the video: NY1

 

Man found dead in bathtub in Woodside

Detectives are investigating the death of a Queens man who was found in his bathtub Wednesday with what police described as two puncture wounds to his head. The 62-year-old Woodside man was discovered Wednesday morning after a friend became concerned when he could not reach him, police sources said. Read More: Daily News

 

Astoria Post Office saved

Following months of apprehension regarding the fate of the post office, the United States Postal Service (USPS) recently announced that Grand Station was removed from a list of branches targeted for potential closure. Read More: Queens Courier

China’s first lady visits Forest Hills Library


| mpantelidis@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Queens Library Left to right: Madame Ma Chow Mei-Ching, Queens Library President and CEO Thomas Galante and Hwai-Min Wood, manager of the Forest Hills Library.

Patrons of the Forest Hills Library received a once-in-a-lifetime lesson on Chinese culture on October 13.

The first lady of the Republic of China, Madame Ma Chow Mei-Ching, visited the library, located at 108-19 71st Avenue, to present a donation of 10 children’s picture books. The books, which are written in Chinese, were contributed with the purpose of encouraging young Americans to learn more about the traditions of China.

Along with her gift, Madame Ma entertained children with tales about the Chinese Zodiac and educated them in the art of creating an origami mouse – the first of the 12 animals of the Zodiac.

A group of elementary school students from the southern Taiwanese county of Pingtung who are traveling with the first lady regaled visitors with a musical performance, which included ancient melodies from the Paiwan aboriginal tribe.

“Queens Library was honored to welcome Madame Ma Chow Mei-Ching and her guests,” said Joanne King, the associate director of communications for Queens Library. “Queens has more than 195,000 people whose first language is Chinese and who have strong cultural ties to their homeland. It is our mission to provide them with reading material in their own language, and to provide our English-speaking library users with a greater understanding of the great art, culture and economy of China. Library users in Queens will make good use of this generous gift, and we are so appreciative.”

Queens’ Morning Roundup: 10/19/2011 – Robbers get tips from ‘The Town’


| jlane@queenscourier.com

The Round Up
Queens Robbers get tips from ‘The Town’

Police say a prolific burglary crew in New York City took cues from the bank heist drama “The Town.” Police say the burglars splashed bleach on ATMs and cash drawers to try to destroy DNA evidence. An NYPD spokesperson said Tuesday that the suspects told detectives they’d watched the bad guys in the Ben Affleck-directed film do the same thing. The real bandits are suspected in 62 burglaries at delis, discount stores and pizzerias in Brooklyn and Queens. Police say they made off with $217,000. Read More: Wall Street Journal

 

 

Mayor Bloomberg targeted in trial’s closing arguments

An attorney for the Queens political operative accused of stealing $1.1 million from Mayor Michael Bloomberg called New York City’s billionaire chief executive arrogant and duplicitous during closing arguments Tuesday. Read More: Wall Street Journal

 

 

China’s first lady visits Forest Hills Library

The first lady of the Republic of China, Madame Ma Chow Mei-Ching, visited the library, located at 108-19 71st Avenue, to present a donation of 10 children’s picture books. The books, which are written in Chinese, were contributed with the purpose of encouraging young Americans to learn more about the traditions of China. Read More: Queens Courier

 

 

Network with the ‘movers and shakers’ at Kings of Queens

Don’t delay. Get your tickets for the 4th Annual Kings of Queens Awards & Networking Event. The event – which recognizes Queens’ most influential men in business – will take place Thursday, November 3 at 8:30 a.m. at Terrace on the Park in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. It will feature a morning of networking with top professionals and an expo with the area’s leading businesses. Read More: Queens Courier  Get Your Tickets: Kings of Queens

 

 

Police question possible suspect in Queens sexual assault

Police said on Tuesday they were talking to a possible suspect in connection with a number of attempted sexual assaults in Queens. Five women and a 12-year-old girl have been groped in Sunnyside and Woodside since mid-September by a man who rides up on a bicycle. The latest attack happened Sunday night in Laurelton. Read More: NY1