Tag Archives: letters

Take care of our trees


| letters@queenscourier.com

As the season transitions from summer to autumn, it is very important that the Department of Parks & Recreation prune many of the trees in the city’s parks and along its streets.

While every single tree cannot be pruned, there are those that are in serious need of pruning to reduce the risk of injury to people or damage to property. Also, those trees that are dead or dying need to be removed as quickly as possible.

While the city is dealing with a fiscal crisis, it is important to maintain the trees in our parks and along our streets. There are over 1 million trees within the city and its parks, and some of them have stood for over 100 years. They give us needed shade in the summer and beautiful, colorful mosaics of changing leaves in the fall. Our evergreen trees grace us with their winter beauty when snow accumulates upon them, adding to the festive feeling of every holiday season.

Trees are our cathedrals of nature, soaring high above streets and homes. They also give off oxygen and take in carbon dioxide, which cleanses the air, and also retain soil from eroding on the sides of our roadways and hills. Let us work to maintain our trees so that they can be enjoyed by many future generations of New Yorkers.

John Amato

Fresh Meadows

A Romney fan


| letters@queenscourier.com

I got a big kick from the views of reader John Amato, who fears our foreign policy will suffer with the election of Mitt Romney.

Apparently Amato has been living in a cave for the last four years. President Barack Obama has stated his desire to see Israel return to pre-1967 borders and has rudely snubbed Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

On the home front, unemployment has remained high. A figure of 8.1 percent is reported, not including all those who have given up looking for work. To rub salt in the wound, amnesty is given to children of illegal aliens, further sending native-born, taxpaying Americans back on the unemployment line. More people than ever are on food stamps or depending upon government for their support.

While the Muslim world is killing ambassadors and American employees, Obama goes on the Letterman show or is playing golf. I don’t recall which one of the 57 states he claims comprise America this was done in, but it sure shows lack of compassion for the murdered ambassador.

I’m a lot more objective in believing neither candidate for president is going to work miracles. However, Obama has had his chance and failed. I’ll vote for Mitt Romney.

Edward Riecks

Howard Beach

True Islamic teachings


| letters@queenscourier.com

I was disturbed by the letter to editor “Cycle of Hate” calling Islam an “extremist theology” (published 9/25/12). As a member of the Worldwide Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, and with our mosques located throughout New York, including one here in Hollis, I would like to remind the writer that true Islamic teaching condemns violence against any human being.

I would also like to remind the writer that our beloved leader, the Worldwide Head of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community (the third largest sect in Islam) His Holiness Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad has called on all Muslims in the world to lay down their arms and refrain from violence. He further called on Muslims around the globe to fight attacks against their beautiful religion of Islam through “Pen” (i.e., through academic discourse). His Holiness condemned the attacks against innocent civilians and American diplomats and reminded Muslims that the Holy Prophet Muhammad taught all Muslims that “the property and lives of all people are sacred” and must be safeguarded. He further called on Muslims to follow the true teachings of Islam and fulfill their responsibilities toward mankind by becoming law–abiding, peaceful citizens of their respective nations.

Dr. Tahir Khan

Ahmadiyya Muslim Community

Bait-uz-Zafar Mosque

Hollis

Take care of our trees


| brennison@queenscourier.com

As the season transitions from summer to autumn, it is very important that the Department of Parks & Recreation prune many of the trees in the city’s parks and along its streets.

While every single tree cannot be pruned, there are those that are in serious need of pruning to reduce the risk of injury to people or damage to property. Also, those trees that are dead or dying need to be removed as quickly as possible.

While the city is dealing with a fiscal crisis, it is important to maintain the trees in our parks and along our streets. There are over 1 million trees within the city and its parks, and some of them have stood for over 100 years. They give us needed shade in the summer and beautiful, colorful mosaics of changing leaves in the fall. Our evergreen trees grace us with their winter beauty when snow accumulates upon them, adding to the festive feeling of every holiday season.

Trees are our cathedrals of nature, soaring high above streets and homes. They also give off oxygen and take in carbon dioxide, which cleanses the air, and also retain soil from eroding on the sides of our roadways and hills. Let us work to maintain our trees so that they can be enjoyed by many future generations of New Yorkers.

John Amato

Fresh Meadows

 

Cycle of hate


| brennison@queenscourier.com

The Muslim world is afire with outrage over images of the Prophet considered to be derogatory. Yet their outrages against other religions are despicable, horrendous, horrible and barbaric. What other religion demands killing those of different beliefs?

Worldwide Muslims number over a billion and assuredly not all are terrorists, extremists or insisting upon forcing their law on everyone. Clearly those who demand blood as the price for any insult they claim shall never accept democracy or could ever comprehend a Bill of Rights so much a foundation of liberated peoples.

The war of extremist theology against non believers is nothing new. The world has witnessed its ugliness and its cost in innocent victims for generations. The U.S. supported dictators throughout the Middle East, in large part due to the need for oil but also to suppress the rise of Islamic fundamentalism.

Containment that was the byword for U.S. foreign policy used against the Soviet Union cannot work to combat this threat. Targeted killing of extremist leadership will continue but will not change the reality for ideologues who believe paradise is their reward for killing infidels.

Sadly, nothing indicates anything different can be expected. If the economics of the poor in these countries improved, ordinary people might find hope for a better future, thereby quieting the voices of extremists.

In the meantime acts of violence destroy economic investment and development insuring the cycle of poverty continues, which empowers zealots of uniformity and hate.

Edward Horn

 

Reason to Move?


| letters@queenscourier.com

“Prohibition All Over Again: Board of Health approves beverage ban” (Billy Rennison, September 21) is doomed to failure before it even starts.

New York City residents will be jealous with envy as neighbors in Nassau County, Westchester County and New Jersey down large “Big Gulps” at the numerous 7-Elevens just minutes from the city line.

The insane policies of Mayor Michael Bloomberg and his “health food police” regulating consumer choice will continue driving more people into surrounding counties and states, just like they do to shop at Walmart, which is also banned in the Big Apple. Freedom loving New York City residents will join us in tasting the flavor of freedom and liberty still alive and well in Nassau County.

Larry Penner

Great Neck

 

Duly noted!


| letters@queenscourier.com

Greetings to The Queens Courier team, just wanted to check in and say we enjoyed your Best of the Boro spread, and plan on trying out the Agra Indian restaurant at some point soon.

Our only concern is that there is no “vegetarian” category in the restaurant listings. Millions of people are now transitioning toward vegan, vegetarian, and flexitarian food choices, for many very important reasons, and we ask that you please consider including that option during the next round of voting.

There appears to be an empty space below the “Thai” category, which would position it perfectly alphabetically.
The Winton family

Whitestone

Bigger fish to fry


| letters@queenscourier.com

Besides litter left on platforms, subway cars and buses, riders have to deal with those hogging two seats, yawning, coughing or sneezing – and more.

But there are other ways to fight the growth of rats, mice and litter. The MTA should consider installing separate cans for recycling newspapers, plastic and glass along with regular garbage. Selling advertising on the side of cans could generate revenues to help cover the costs of more frequent off-peak and late night collection and disposal. If asked, the NYC Department of Sanitation could do the same on the street adjacent to subway station entrances.

Many have long since forgotten that up until the late 1960s, it was common to find both penny gum and 10 cent soda machines dispensing products at many subway stations. It was a time people respected authority and law. That generation of riders did not litter subway stations and buses, leaving behind gum, candy wrappers, paper cups, bottles and newspapers. No one would openly eat pizza, chicken or other messy foods while riding a bus or subway.

There are also solutions in dealing with waiting for or riding the subway and having the “urge to go.” The odds of finding a working bathroom for “relief” may be too late. Until the early 1960s, most subway stations had clean, safe, working bathrooms with toilet paper. Revenues generated from a 10 cent fee helped cover the costs.

Why not consider charging a fee between 25 cents and a dollar? That would generate revenues to assign a matron, along with covering security and maintenance costs. This could help provide secure, fully-equipped bathrooms at most of the 465 subway stations. Many riders would gladly pay this small price to insure working bathrooms rather than face the current unpleasant alternatives which contribute to dirty subways.

Police have more important tasks to perform by preventing fare evasion, pickpockets, mugging, sexual harassment and other real crimes against victims rather than give out $250 fines to those caught snacking on the subways.

Larry Penner

 

In favor of ban


| letters@queenscourier.com

I would like to applaud the Board of Health voting to ban sugary drinks larger than 16 ounces.

We are rapidly becoming a nation of fat, unfit and unhealthy people. Our mayor has called for this action and that, I feel, is a good thing. Mayor Michael Bloomberg cares enough for us to change that and for that I say, “Kudos Mike!”

Frederick R. Bedell Jr.

Glen Oaks Village

 

Attacks will not be tolerated


| letters@queenscourier.com

The attack on the American Embassy in Libya which resulted in the death of our American ambassador and three other Americans can only be described in one word — horrific.

Why did that film producer have to make a film that derided the Muslim faith? With the 11th anniversary of September 11 just past, this was the last thing that should have been done. There already is enough anger directed at the U.S. from the Arab world; this film will only cause that anger and rage to worsen.

President Barack Obama needs to close every American embassy in the Middle East and recall all of our ambassadors and other diplomatic staff immediately. Allof our news media outlets also need to recall all of their reporters. It is no longer safe for our people to be in any of these countries.

Obama also needs to respond swiftly and effectively to this terrible act of murder. While the government of Libya may not have had a role, it needs to be warned that these types of barbaric acts will not be tolerated by our government, and that the Libyan government needs to take more responsibility for protecting Americans living in there.

It is only a matter of time before the entire Middle East erupts into all-out conflict. It is a simmering powder keg ready to blow — and it will.

John Amato

Fresh Meadows

 

One hand washes the other


| lpenner@queenscourier.com

If tap water is good enough for several hundred thousand District of Columbia residents along with millions of ordinary Americans on a daily basis, one wonders why Senator Charles Schumer sees the need for taxpayer funds to purchase bottled water from Saratoga Springs, New York to be served at the upcoming January 2013 presidential inauguration?

Is this the message we should send to millions of Americans living under the current drought losing crops, incomes and livelihoods?

Want to bet that the owners of the Saratoga Springs bottled water company are part of Schumer’s yearly multi-million dollar “Pay for Play” campaign fundraising machine? Will they return the “favor” by making a campaign contribution to his “2016 re-election fund” or some other “independent political action committee” controlled by Schumer?

The Park Slope, Brooklyn yuppie Schumer is like Don Corleone. The “Godfather” has to “wet his beak” in all financial activities operating within his domain.

Larry Penner

 

Bigger fish to fry


| letters@queenscourier.com

Besides litter left on platforms, subway cars and buses, riders have to deal with those hogging two seats, yawning, coughing or sneezing – and more.

But there are other ways to fight the growth of rats, mice and litter. The MTA should consider installing separate cans for recycling newspapers, plastic and glass along with regular garbage. Selling advertising on the side of cans could generate revenues to help cover the costs of more frequent off-peak and late night collection and disposal. If asked, the NYC Department of Sanitation could do the same on the street adjacent to subway station entrances.

Many have long since forgotten that up until the late 1960s, it was common to find both penny gum and 10 cent soda machines dispensing products at many subway stations. It was a time people respected authority and law. That generation of riders did not litter subway stations and buses, leaving behind gum, candy wrappers, paper cups, bottles and newspapers. No one would openly eat pizza, chicken or other messy foods while riding a bus or subway.

There are also solutions in dealing with waiting for or riding the subway and having the “urge to go.” The odds of finding a working bathroom for “relief” may be too late. Until the early 1960s, most subway stations had clean, safe, working bathrooms with toilet paper. Revenues generated from a 10 cent fee helped cover the costs.

Why not consider charging a fee between 25 cents and a dollar? That would generate revenues to assign a matron, along with covering security and maintenance costs. This could help provide secure, fully-equipped bathrooms at most of the 465 subway stations. Many riders would gladly pay this small price to insure working bathrooms rather than face the current unpleasant alternatives which contribute to dirty subways.

Police have more important tasks to perform by preventing fare evasion, pickpockets, mugging, sexual harassment and other real crimes against victims rather than give out $250 fines to those caught snacking on the subways.

Larry Penner

 

We can clean up this economic mess


| letters@queenscourier.com

The debate over the first term of President Barack Obama has raged, poisoned by politics and racism. It is important that this debate occurs with hard, objective facts so that we can arrive at a conclusion based on objectivity.

It is important that we remember that the economy was already in a free fall and crashed before Obama took office. On January 20, 2009, the economy was in a full free fall, losing more jobs monthly than any time in history. The job losses began in early 2008 and increased in velocity as the year progressed. That year climaxed with the meltdown of the financial market and its impact was immediate. By 2010, the economy hit bottom with a total job loss of 8.8 million jobs. This was not the worst recession since the Great Depression, as reported — it was a depression.

Obama is the first president in the history of the United States of America to take office with the economy in a full downward spiral and two of wars in full effect. As we consider and debate the future of the country, the electorate must consider the dynamics of what preceded the ascension to the office of the president. As we continue to offshore jobs, the harder it is for our economy to rebound. So while we could say that Obama did not clean up the mess properly, it is not fair to say that he caused it.

The Bush tax cuts did not create jobs, nor did they create economic growth. The acceleration of the tax cuts that are embodied in the first part (Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001) and enacted in the second part (Jobs and Growth Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2003) was a giant mistake on the part of President George Bush and the Republican Party. To cut the income of the national government was a gross miscalculation on the part of the republican leadership of the country. The repeal of the Glass–Steagall Act was a mistake. We have seen the economy without the Glass-Steagall Act, twice, and with the Act in effect. The results are clear that there was greater economic stability with the Act in effect.Congress must take action.

Just as we all must do in our house, all income to the government must be reviewed and prioritized before it is expended. Social Security and Medicare can easily be made solvent. Eighty six percent of the Social Security shortfall would be eliminated if we simply remove the annual earnings income cap and tax all income through the end of each year. In addition, increase the Social Security tax by a quarter of one percent for employers and employees; then the Social Security trust fund becomes fully funded. Now we can have a pleasant debate about increased benefits.

If we love our country, then we must have a shared sacrifice and return to the Clinton tax rates. This action, coupled with closing some corporate loopholes and some belt tightening, puts the country on a clear path to once again being “in the black.”

The question at hand for the citizens of this great nation is embodied in the words of President John Kennedy, “My fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.”

Fitzverity C. Silvera

Secretary Treasurer

IBT Local 808

Long Island City

 

Saluting teachers


| editorial@queenscourier.com

As the nation celebrates National Teacher Appreciation Week, we need to definitely show our appreciation for all teachers across the United States.
Teachers work extremely hard under a myriad of conditions, ranging from overcrowded classrooms, to dealing with discipline problems, lack of instructional materials, sometimes difficult parents and sometimes unsupportive administrators and supervisors.

Also, teachers strive to help each student reach his or her full potential, and that certainly is not an easy task. Our teachers deserve the highest respect and need to be treated with the professionalism that they very much deserve. They also need to be paid a fair and livable salary. Let us salute our teachers each and every day, and thank them sincerely for all that they do for the students in our country.

BY John Amato