Tag Archives: Lawrence Hilsdorf

TSA apologizes to elderly women for strip search at Kennedy Airport


| jlane@queenscourier.com

Graphic by Jay Lane

TSA apologizes to elderly women for strip search at Kennedy Airport

In an about-face, the feds have admitted wrongdoing in the cases of two elderly women who say they were strip-searched at Kennedy Airport by overzealous screeners. Federal officials had initially insisted that all “screening procedures were followed” after Ruth Sherman, 89, and Lenore Zimmerman, 85, went public with separate accounts of humiliating strip searches. But in a letter obtained by the Daily News, the Homeland Security Department acknowledges that screeners violated standard practice in their treatment of the ailing octogenarians last November. Read More: Daily News

Governor Cuomo’s public pension bomb

Gov. Cuomo lobbed a political grenade at New York’s powerful public-employee unions yesterday, proposing a radical pension overhaul for future city and state workers as part of his $132.5 billion state budget plan. Cuomo said the plan would save New York City $30 billion in pension costs over 30 years, while saving $83 billion for the state and local governments outside the city over the same period. “We can no longer sustain the current pension system,” Cuomo said, citing a projected 185 percent treasury-busting increase in pension costs from 2009 to 2015 if nothing is done. Read More: New York Post

Bayside mourns beloved father of six

When Lawrence Hilsdorf was laid to rest, an entire community cried. The 55-year-old, affectionately known as “Larry,” was more than just a Bayside resident – he was a neighborhood icon, and his roots in the community ran deep. He went to Sacred Heart, then Bayside High School, before settling to raise his own family in the area. The father of six boys – Charlie, 25, James, 20, twins Billy and Bobby, 18, Patrick, 15, and Jack, 13 – Larry put his life on the line as a police officer beginning in 1981, first with the Queens North Task Force, and then with the 114th Precinct in Astoria. Read More: Queens Courier

Hunt for cruise victims on hold as wreckage shifts

Italian rescue workers suspended operations Wednesday after a stricken cruise ship shifted slightly on the rocks near the Tuscan coast, creating deep concerns about the safety of divers and firefighters searching for the 22 people still missing. The $450 million Costa Concordia cruise ship had more than 4,200 passengers and crew on board when it slammed into the reef Friday off the tiny Italian island of Giglio after the captain made an unauthorized maneuver. The bodies of five adult passengers — four men and one woman, all wearing lifejackets — were discovered in the wreckage Tuesday, raising the death toll to 11. Their nationalities were not immediately released. Read More: New York Post

Giants passing game could slip against 49ers if weather is bad

There is zero percent chance the Giants will be able to operate their high-flying passing attack at peak efficiency Sunday against the 49ers in the NFC Championship. Anyone who thinks they can is all wet. The cohesive, rugged, old-school (think defense first) 49ers would be a challenge no matter where and no matter what the conditions, but looming up ahead is the true test whether or not the Giants are an all-weather team. After a rousing 37-20 Divisional beatdown of the defending champion Packers in the cold at Lambeau Field, go figure that a trip to northern California could be fraught with soggy peril for the Giants. Read More: New York Post

Wikipedia goes dark in protest of anti-piracy legislation

Free online knowledge site Wikipedia has gone dark as part of a protest over legislation in the US Congress intended to crack down on online piracy. The English version of the online encyclopedia shut down at midnight Tuesday ET. The website will be inaccessible for 24 hours to protest the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) introduced in the House of Representatives and the Senate version, the Protect IP Act (PIPA). It was replaced with a message that read, “Imagine a World Without Free Knowledge.” “For over a decade, we have spent millions of hours building the largest encyclopedia in human history. Right now, the US Congress is considering legislation that could fatally damage the free and open internet. For 24 hours, to raise awareness, we are blacking out Wikipedia,” it went on. Read More: New York Post

Residents Protest Jackson Heights Supermarket

Some Jackson Heights residents and elected officials have declared the Trade Fair store on 37th Avenue a blight on the neighborhood and are rallying for it to clean up its act. Read More & Watch the Video: NY1

Two Correction Officers Sentenced In Connection With 2008 Rikers Assaults

After reaching a plea deal with the Bronx district attorney’s office, former Correction Officers Michael McKie and Khalid Nelson learned their fates Tuesday in State Supreme Court in the Bronx. City investigators said the pair were among officers at Rikers Island running an intimidation campaign known as “the program,” and they had ordered teenage inmates to beat up others to maintain discipline in the adolescent unit. McKie, seen above left, who pleaded guilty to assault, was sentenced to two years in state prison. Nelson, seen above right, who pleaded guilty to attempted assault, was sentenced to one year. Read More: NY1

Bayside mourns beloved father of six


| tcimino@queenscourier.com

BAYSIDE COP DIES PHOTOS 001w

When Lawrence Hilsdorf was laid to rest, an entire community cried.

The 55-year-old, affectionately known as “Larry,” was more than just a Bayside resident – he was a neighborhood icon, and his roots in the community ran deep.

He went to Sacred Heart, then Bayside High School, before settling to raise his own family in the area.

The father of six boys – Charlie, 25, James, 20, twins Billy and Bobby, 18, Patrick, 15, and Jack, 13 – Larry put his life on the line as a police officer beginning in 1981, first with the Queens North Task Force, and then with the 114th Precinct in Astoria.

“He had so many stories to tell about his experience on ‘the job’ but he told me the most important thing was the friendships and brotherhood he had with so many of you that to the day of his death were strong and vibrant,” said his widow, Maureen, during her eulogy.

After Larry retired from the NYPD, he became a popular bartender at some of the hotspots along Bell Boulevard, among them K.C.’s and TNT’s and McCabe’s.

In 2008, a routine physical turned up something. Larry was only 50 at the time.

“They found a very small nodule,” said Maureen. “He swam through that surgery.”

Then a colonoscopy showed polyps, one of which was malignant. A surgeon removed part of his colon on March 14, 2008, and Maureen remembers it was the day her husband’s health took a turn for the worse.

“He recovered but was never right,” she said. “We went back to the internist and we were in and out of the hospital.”

He was admitted in May and tests found an obstruction; soon after he was released, Larry had lapsed into a coma.

“He spent 32 days in the ICU [Intensive Care Unit],” Maureen told The Courier. “He was even given last rites.”

But Larry, ever a fighter, said his wife, pulled through and spent the summer of 2008 in rehab. At that point, he had lost his colon and part of his small intestine.

“He went from 250 pounds to 120,” said Maureen, who had to give up her job at Bourbon Street to care for her husband.

The staff there was so moved by Larry’s courage, they organized a benefit for him in 2009.

“This really gave Larry the will,” said a grateful Maureen. “He was a real fighter.”

Last September, the Hilsdorf family was able to get hospice care at home.

“In the last couple of months he really deteriorated. There was nothing to do, he was constantly battling infection. It was a very long battle, but he wanted to be home with his family and kids.”

And those “kids,” said Maureen, were not only his own children, but their friends as well, who spent countless hours at the Hilsdorf home.

“Larry was like a father to the kids’ friends,” said his wife.

On January 9, at 11:29 p.m., Maureen said, Larry lost his battle.

“This world is a better place today because for 55 years Larry lived and really lived on this Earth,” said Maureen. “My heart is aching and all six of our children, Charles, Jimmy, Billy, Bobby, Patrick, and Jack, will never be the same. We have lost our rock”.

Over 1,000 people showed up at Sacred Heart as Larry was laid to rest.

“We had an Honor Guard, it was amazing,” said the widow.

“Larry was a fantastic guy,” said Ellen LaPerna, manager at Bourbon Street and a long-time neighbor. “He would always give the shirt off his back. He was a total Bayside guy – everyone knew him, everyone loved him. He was an all-around great guy.”

Maureen said that though this is a very difficult time for the close-knit family, they are lucky to have a lot of support, from extended family, friends, neighbors and the community as a whole.

“We just want to support them [the family] and make sure they’re ok,” LaPerna told The Courier.

In her eulogy, Maureen explained to the mourners just what kind of a man Larry was.

“Most of all he wanted me to remind his six sons how proud he is of all of you. How

lucky he was as a father to get to know each of your close friends and treat them as if they were his own kids. He is not away or gone now. His heart and soul are always with us. I know in my heart that he will walk each step with each of his children, never skipping a beat.”