Tag Archives: Laseam Hogan

Queens Museum lit orange for gun violence awareness following vigil


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Angy Altamirano

The “World’s Borough” came together Monday night to honor the nine lives lost in last week’s South Carolina church shooting, and show the rest of the nation that a diverse community can unite as one.

Elected officials, local community and religious leaders, and families of victims of gun violence gathered in front of the Queens Museum during a candlelight vigil remembering the victims of gun violence throughout the borough, and paying tribute to the nine people shot and killed at the Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, South Carolina, on June 17.

“We are the borough of Queens, we are 130 languages spoken in our school system, we hail from over 120 countries and you know what? We take the greatest pride in that diversity. We are proud and we stand together to say that gun violence, especially racist terrorist gun violence, will not be tolerated and we will stand together to send that message,” Queens Borough President Melinda Katz said.

Monday night also marked the first of nine nights that the front exterior of the Queens Museum will be illuminated in orange, the official color of Gun Violence Awareness Month. Through June 30, an average of about 168,000 motorists per day will be able to see the museum as they drive by on the Grand Central Parkway.

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“I hope the orange glow of the museum’s façade this evening will remember each of the passing motorists of our collective responsibilities,” said Laura Raicovich, executive director of the Queens Museum.

Those present during the interfaith vigil included local religious leaders who each voiced the importance of coming together to fight for the end of gun violence. Pastor Richard Hogan of the Divine Deliverance Ministry in Jamaica and father of Laseam Hogan, who was killed in 2010 at the age of 27, also led the group in a prayer.

“We come here to launch a movement. We’ve been moving but we need a movement, a movement against gun violence. This is not a movement of just some folk but it has to be a movement of all folk,” said Rev. Dr. Alfonso Wyatt of the Greater Allen A.M.E Cathedral of New York in Jamaica. “We are all impacted. Bullets do not respect age, [do] not respect denomination, faith, tradition, socio-economic background. We have to come together.”


At the end of the night, family members of victims of gun violence read out names of their lost friends, husbands, sons, daughters and other loved ones.

“We commit to continue to be the trailblazers in the borough of Queens and make sure that as the Queens division of the crisis management system, we will show the world how people from different races, people from different ideologies, people from different nationalities, people from different beliefs, and walks and everything that you can think of can come together and change the culture of violence and stop the epidemic of violence from spreading and killing our children and destroying our families,” said Erica Ford, CEO and founder of LIFE Camp Inc., a group founded in 2002 with the mission of teaching violence prevention in schools.

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Flushing man gets 25 years to life for killing over $200 debt


| mchan@queenscourier.com

A 20-year-old from Flushing was sentenced to a maximum of life in prison for killing a man over a $200 debt he owed.

Victim Laseam Hogan, 27, lent the money to Malcolm Thompson of the Pomonok Houses in 2010, according to the district attorney.

Hogan approached Thompson for his $200 in a Pomonok Houses courtyard months later on October 15, officials said. Instead of repaying his debt, then-18-year-old Thompson shot Hogan to death, according to District Attorney Richard A. Brown.

“I’ll dead you. You ain’t getting (expletive),” Thompson allegedly told Hogan before whipping out his gun, according to prosecutors.

Thompson fired bullets at Hogan’s leg and torso, then stood over him and let another three rounds hit Hogan’s torso, neck and head, according to Brown.
Thompson was sentenced last week to 25 years to life in prison, Brown said.

He was convicted in August of second-degree murder and second-degree criminal possession of a weapon after a four-week jury trial.

“The price that the defendant must now pay to settle what originally had been a minor unpaid debt is of his own doing,” Brown said. “The defendant has shown that he had little regard for human life and is deserving of the serious punishment meted out.”

 

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